Coronavirus Pandemic: At least 120 cases in Ohio, 1 possible death near Toledo

Coronavirus: What you need to know Thursday

Ohio has at least 119 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, according to the Ohio Department of Health, not counting a new case confirmed by Warren County health officials. Of the 120 cases, at least 33 have been admitted to a hospital.

There now is the report of the first COVID-19-related death in Ohio, near Toledo.

Local confirmed cases reported to the state health department:

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  • Butler (8), Clark (1), Darke (1), Miami (1), Montgomery (1)

The range of dates from the onset of the illness is from Feb. 7 to March 18.  Ohio officials said 43 females and 76 males have been infected. The age range of cases is 2 years old to 91 years old.

Several developments occurred Thursday night:

That brings to 11 the number of presumptive positive coronavirus cases with the two reported Wednesday.

There also are three additional residents and two staffers who are in the Upper Valley Medical Center. Tests for COVID-19 for them are pending.

Gov. Mike DeWine held a daily update press conference at 2:30 p.m. Thursday.

Here are the announcements made during the press conference:

  • Dr. Amy Acton and Gov. Mike DeWine are aware of reports of the first Ohio death related to coronavirus near Toledo in northwest Ohio.  The case is still under investigation.
  • DeWine asked Ohioans to fly the American flag outside their home as a sign of unity.
  • Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor said courts must be open to address emergency and time sensitive matters.
  • Internet cafes are being ordered to close.
  • Public Utilities Commission of Ohio issued a moratorium in regard to electric and gas disconnects until May 1.
  • If you have been traveling, please stay in your home when you return. Make sure you aren't in contact with those outside of your household.
  • DeWine is issuing an executive order that will expand access to medical and behavioral health services using telehealth. No existing relationship with a doctor is needed to get access to services.
  • Ohio now is on the upslope of the curve. "It is urgent that we talk with each other -- it is time to heed this call. You need to stay at home if you can stay at home with your family," said Dr. Amy Acton.
  • Ohio did apply with the U.S. Small Business Administration for small businesses and non-profits to be able to apply for low-interest loans. That request has been approved. Loans can be used to deal with fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable, and other bills. For more info: call 1-800-659-2955.
  • Secretary of State Frank LaRose is still working with the courts and state legislature to extend election until June 2.
  • Lt. Gov. Jon Husted: "I was on a call with several financial CEOs -- they asked me to emphasize to you to stay calm. The banking system is well. Your banks will be there for you and you can count on them."

Public Health - Dayton and Montgomery County and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley held their daily afternoon news conference.

Here are the key points:

  • Bars and restaurants that continue to ignore the state order to cease operations, except for carryout and delivery, will be identified for the public to see on the Public Health - Dayton and Montgomery County website
  • Citizens should continue to consider donating blood, Mayor Nan Whaley said
  • All EMS personnel in the region are ordered to conserve -- and preserve -- personal protective equipment (gloves, face shields, goggles, coveralls, masks and gowns)
  • College and high school students should not be going out of state on Spring Break because of the heightened chance of being exposed to or spreading the virus

Here’s what else you need to know today:

  • Kettering Health Network has administered coronavirus tests to 73 people. Of those 31 have been negative. The only positive test has been the Montgomery County patient in his 60s. The network is awaiting results for 41 of the tests.
  • President says FDA will fast track anti-viral treatments for patient with coronavirus
  • State and private labs are required by law to report all coronavirus cases to the CDC.
  • All but five Bureau of Motor Vehicles locations in Ohio are shut down.  Remaining open locations only handling commercial licenses. Other services available online.
  • Testing is limited and will likely remain that way. The vast majority of Ohioans don't need to be tested. If you feel symptoms, act as though you have the coronavirus. You should stay home and so should your family.
  • Law enforcement has been asked to not issue tickets for expired licenses if people say they can no longer get a renewal.
  • Hair salons, barbershops, spas and tattoo parlors have been ordered to close.
  • Businesses are asked, beginning immediately, to take the temperature of every employee daily before they come into the workplace.
  • Two weeks ago, 6,500 unemployment requests were made. Three days into this week, 78,000 requests have been made.