breaking news

Steve R. Rauch indicted on felony charges alleging illegal dumping

Published: Monday, November 26, 2018 @ 2:54 PM
Updated: Monday, November 26, 2018 @ 3:09 PM

Steve Rauch Inc.: Things to know

The president of Steve R. Rauch Inc. has been indicted on several unclassified felony charges connected to suspected illegal activity in 2016, according to court records.

Steve R. Rauch was indicted on five felonies, including illegal dumping of solid waste and illegally operating a solid waste facility without a license, court records show.

>> Questions surround raids on businessman’s properties

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Rauch, reached by phone Monday afternoon, said, “I don’t know anything about this. I have no clue. I can’t comment on something I don’t know anything about.” 

Rauch is accused of illegally dumping solid waste at the following addresses, according to the indictment:

  • 4000 Hydraulic Road
  • 1550 West Carrollton-Soldiers Home Road
  • 7750 Farmersville Road

Rauch is accused of illegally operating a solid waste facility at these addresses:

  • 7750 Farmersville Road
  • 1550 West Carrollton-Soldiers Home Road

Rauch provides demolition, excavation and trucking services through his companies Steve Rauch Inc., Rauch Trucking and SRI. His businesses do private work, and have also received millions of dollars in local and federal contracts, including work at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and from the city of Dayton.

The Dayton property that was raided by federal, state and local authorities in December 2016, at 1550 Soldiers Home-West Carrollton Road, houses a state-licensed construction and demolition debris dump.

Numerous agents from the U.S. Secret Service, Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation and other agencies spent that day going in and out of the main office of Steve Rauch Inc. in Dayton on the border with West Carrollton, as well as Rauch’s Bearcreek Farm property in Jefferson Twp. 

The raids followed a months-long BCI investigation into illegal dumping on 28 acres of land in West Carrollton near the Great Miami River. Certain companies were allowed to dump dirt and “clean” fill there, but more than 30 tons of improper material was found buried at the site, which is owned by the city.