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Google your name — so it doesn’t cost you a job

Published: Thursday, March 09, 2017 @ 2:35 PM


            Doug Barry, Barry Staff president, explains how employers use Google and social media to help choose new hires.
Doug Barry, Barry Staff president, explains how employers use Google and social media to help choose new hires.

If you haven’t Googled your own name lately — you may want to do it now — especially if you are looking for a job.

Employers are checking out your checkered past — and the red flags they are looking for might not be what you would think.

Nearly all potential employers will be Googling your name, said Barry Staff president Doug Barry, ‘we always tell our folks- don’t give people a reason not to hire you.”

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Employers are looking for major issues on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram — illegal activities and resume lies — but the red flags go beyond those and wild party pics.

Now, employers are also scanning for sketchy side businesses and political posts.

“If you are applying for an upper management level position and you have a lot of controversial things on your social media sites- an employer might look negatively against that,” said Barry.

He recommends deleting any controversial or inappropriate posts, and making your social media accounts private.

Also, inform a potential employer if you share a name with someone who has a criminal background.

You can request that Google remove some sensitive personal information from searches, but if there is incorrect information on a particular site you need to contact the webmaster directly to request removal.

Claire Keathley of Dayton started a new job as a receptionist for Barry Staff on Wednesday — her job search?

“It was actually more difficult than I expected it to be,” Keathley said. She sent out 150 resumes and applications over four months before landing her position, but she said she wasn’t worried about her internet and social media footprint impacting her employment prospects.

“It started way back in high school — we’ve always been told to be careful about that,” said Keathley, “I don’t want to offend anyone or get into any of those arguments on social media, so I don’t try to post anything political.”

Rachel Murray is a WHIO-TV consumer reporter. You can watch her reports on News Center 7, follow her on Twitter @RMurrayWHIO, and like her fan page on Facebook.