UPDATE: Pilot killed when plane crashed into home near Cincinnati was geo-mapping

Plane crashes into Hamilton Co. home

UPDATE @ 10:22 a.m. ( March 13)

Officials are still investigating what might have caused David Sapp, to crash the plane he was piloting into a Madiera home Tuesday afternoon.

His plane was registered to Mississippi-based MARC, Inc., a company that advertises itself as "North America's largest provider of specialized contract aircraft and flight crews for airborne GIS, survey and surveillance projects,” according to our news partners at WCPO.

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RadarBox, a website that tracks air traffic, showed Sapp had been on his way back to the Lunken airport at the time of the crash.

UPDATE @ 11:07 p.m.: The pilot killed Tuesday afternoon in Madeira, northeast of Cincinnati, was geo-mapping when his Piper PA-31 crashed into a home, the Ohio State Highway Patrol said.

David Sapp, 62, was flying for Mississippi-based MARC, Inc., "North America's largest provider of specialized contract aircraft and flight crews for airborne GIS, survey and surveillance projects."

Sapp was geo-mapping and taking aerial photos when the plane struck the remodeled portion of a house on Rollymeade Avenue in Madeira about 3:20 p.m. and caught fire, patrol Lt. S.J. Kuntz said in a prepared statement.

No one was in the house, which did not catch fire.

Two dogs inside the home were rescued by neighbors, our news partners at WCPO.com report.

According to RadarBox, a website that tracks air traffic, the plane took off from the Cincinnati Municipal Airport (known locally as Lunken) and flew a northwest-southeast pattern across a large portion of southwest Ohio, then flew north to the Springfield area and flew a similar pattern there.

Madeira Fire Chief gives press conference on plane crash

The plane, which can seat up to eight, was headed southwest, back toward Cincinnati, when it went down.

Chief Steve Ashbrok, Madeira-Indian Hill Joint Fire District, said the plane was inbound to Lunken.

Investigators with the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are assisting in the continuing crash investigation, Kuntz said.