Coronavirus: Why test results from UD Arena COVID-19 site aren’t reported

As local and state officials have been working to collect data on who has tested positive for coronavirus or COVID-19, the data is being collected in a variety of ways.

As local and state officials have been working to collect data on who has tested positive for coronavirus or COVID-19, the data is being collected in a variety of ways.

During daily briefings, Dr. Amy Acton, Ohio Department of Health director, has talked about the difficulty of collecting all the information quickly and accurately as counties and hospitals may use a variety of ways to report to the state.

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In Dayton, a large testing effort has been set up outside University of Dayton Arena, led by Premier Health.

Officials have been able to report to the media each day on how many people were tested for the flu, how many were positive, and how many were tested for the coronavirus.

Officials have not been able to report on how many positive coronavirus tests there have been.

Unlike flu tests, which can come back in 15 minutes, coronavirus tests are not as immediate. People tested at the arena find out later if their test was positive. Sharon Howard, director of site communications for Premier Health, told News Center 7.

“All test results go to the ordering physician; if a positive COVID-19 result, that information will go to both the ordering physician and the Ohio Department of Health.”

Dr. Acton has said the collection of those tests take time and may not be immediately reflected in state data.

Tuesday, 80 flu tests were administered at the arena location, with 9 positive flu tests, Premier officials said, while 105 COVID-19 tests were administered.

Nearly 1,400 COVID-19 tests have been administered since the collection site outside the arena opened March 17, Premier officials said.

The testing site at the arena was set up because health experts want people with respiratory ailments out of emergency rooms and doctors’ offices, if possible, to help slow the spread of coronavirus. A physician’s order is required in order to be tested at the arena location.

Officials recommend people use phone calls and e-visits to physicians as a first step to receive treatment.

If you suspect you may have symptoms of coronavirus, you can ask questions of the Ohio Department of Health Hotline at 1-833-427-5634.

Beginning Wednesday, the testing site at the arena will be operated from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the parking lot at 1801 Edwin C. Moses Blvd.

  • Premier Health's Premier Virtual Care is available 24/7.
  • Kettering patients can set up virtual visits through MyChart.
  • Reid Health has set up free COVID-19 screenings through the Reid HealthNOW urgent care app.