Space Glossary

Published: Monday, April 24, 2017 @ 7:39 AM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 8:18 AM

FILE - In this early morning, Aug. 13, 2013 file photo, a meteor streaks past the faint band of the Milky Way galaxy above the Wyoming countryside north of Cheyenne, Wyo., during a Perseids meteor shower. On Thursday night, Aug. 11, 2016 into early Friday morning, the Perseid meteor shower is expected to peak with double the normal number of meteors. Scientists call this an outburst, and they say it could reach up to 200 meteors per hour. (AP Photo/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle, Blaine McCartney)
FILE - In this early morning, Aug. 13, 2013 file photo, a meteor streaks past the faint band of the Milky Way galaxy above the Wyoming countryside north of Cheyenne, Wyo., during a Perseids meteor shower. On Thursday night, Aug. 11, 2016 into early Friday morning, the Perseid meteor shower is expected to peak with double the normal number of meteors. Scientists call this an outburst, and they say it could reach up to 200 meteors per hour. (AP Photo/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle, Blaine McCartney)

 

Asteroid: A large space rock that stays in space. These rocky objects orbit the sun and are much smaller than planets.

 

Bolide: The light emitted by a large meteoroid or asteroid as it explodes in the atmosphere. Sound can sometimes be produced.

 

Comet: A solid body made of ice, rock, dust and frozen gases. As they fracture and disintegrate, some comets leave a trail of solid debris. 

 

Fireball: A very bright meteor. It is brighter than the planet Venus. There are several thousand meteors that are bright enough to be fireballs each day. Most occur over the ocean. 

 

Meteor: Sometimes called shooting stars. These are space objects that can as small as dust or as large as a rock. Once they enter the Earth’s atmosphere they are heated by friction burn up. The light emitted when traveling through the atmosphere is the meteor.

 

Meteorite: A meteor is able to survive the hot entry into the Earth’s atmosphere and reach the ground. 

 

Meteoroid: A smaller asteroid or space rock that can orbit the sun and become meteors if they enter the Earth’s atmosphere.

 

Meteor Shower: An annual event, when the Earth passes through a region having a great concentration of debris, such as particles left by a comet. From Earth, it looks like meteors radiate from the same point in the night sky.

Solar Eclipse: When the Moon moves between Earth and the Sun and the 3 celestial bodies form a straight line: Earth–Moon–Sun. Solar eclipses only occur during a New Moon.

Total Solar Eclipse: When the Moon completely covers the Sun, as seen from Earth.

Partial Solar Eclipse: When the Moon only partially covers the disk of the Sun.

Annular Solar Eclipse: When the Moon appears smaller than the Sun as it passes centrally across the solar disk and a bright ring, or annulus, of sunlight remains visible during the eclipse.

Hybrid Solar Eclipse: A rare form of solar eclipse, which changes from an annular to a total solar eclipse, and vice versa, along its path.

 

Lunar Eclipse: When Earth comes between the Sun and the Moon and blocks the Sun's rays from directly reaching the Moon. Lunar eclipses only happen at Full Moon.

Total Lunar Eclipse: When Earth's umbra – the central, dark part of its shadow – obscures all of the Moon's surface.

Partial Lunar Eclipse: When only part of the Moon's surface is obscured by Earth’s umbra.

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse: When the Moon travels through the faint penumbral portion of Earth’s shadow.

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Freeze Warning in effect; temperatures climb into weekend

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 3:26 AM

Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
Getty Images
Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images(Getty Images)

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Freeze warning in effect south of I-70 until 9 a.m.
  • Sunshine returns today
  • Warming up through the weekend

>> Why freeze warning only issued for the southern Miami Valley

DETAILED FORECAST

Today: It will be a chilly morning with temperatures in the 30s with frost expected to develop, said Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini. We’ll see sunshine through the day. Temperatures will finally get closer to normal again with highs in the upper 50s. It will be a clear and chilly night.

>> Clear skies in time for Lyrid Meteor Shower this weekend

Saturday: It will be a nice start to the weekend. The day looks to be dry, but clouds will likely increase for the afternoon. Highs will be around 60.

>> WHIO Weather App

Sunday: It will be another beautiful weekend day with highs in the low 60s, which is right where temperatures should be. There will be plenty of sunshine.

>> Live Dopper 7 Interactive Radar

Monday: Temperatures will continue to climb as highs reach the mid-60s. Clouds will increase and thicken up into the evening. A passing rain shower at night can’t be ruled out.

Tuesday: We’ll see scattered, mild rain showers. It will be breezy and cloudy. Highs will be around 60.

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WPAFB Friday Weather: Moderate temperatures continue for the weekend

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 12:28 AM


Staff Writer
(Staff Writer)

WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE—It will be another cold start and while there may be frost, the area will start snow-free, said Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell.

RELATED: 5-Day Forecast

Lots of sunshine is expected into the afternoon with temperatures pushing back into the middle 50s. Skies will remain mostly cloudy tonight with some high clouds moving across the area this weekend.

RELATED: County-by-County Weather

Despite the mix of sun and clouds, temperatures will continue to moderate over the weekend and should reach into the lower 60s by Sunday afternoon. There will be a slight chance for a few showers late Monday with a better chance Tuesday into Wednesday.

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Freeze warning for some overnight; warmer weekend ahead

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 3:21 AM
Updated: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 3:30 PM

Gradual warm up towards the weekend.

Freeze Warning will go into effect at 2 a.m. Friday for Montgomery, Greene, Warren, Preble and Butler counties.

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Clearing skies, cold tonight
  • Sunshine, milder weather Friday
  • Dry and mild through weekend

>> Live Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

DETAILED FORECAST

Overnight: Skies will be mainly clear and temperatures will fall to near or below freezing for several hours overnight.

>> Clear skies in time for Lyrid Meteor Shower this weekend

Friday: Sunshine will end the workweek with a steady warm-up getting under way. Highs will reach into the middle 50s.

Saturday: Expect lots of sunshine but with some high clouds moving by. It will be milder with temperatures topping out in the upper 50s.

Sunday: Partly cloudy skies and mild conditions will end the weekend with highs in the lower 60s.

Monday: A bit more cloud cover will be around through the day. There also is a slight chance for a passing shower, mainly south. Highs will reach into the middle 60s.

>> WHIO Weather App

Tuesday: Expect lots of clouds and a chance for showers. Highs will reach back into the lower 60s.

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Why freeze warning only issued for the southern Miami Valley 

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 5:51 PM

Freeze warning for the southern part of the Miami Valley

Since the first day of spring, March 20, the days have become longer and the strength of the sun has increased. 

This change in incoming solar radiation will directly impact the rise in our daily average temperatures. 

Typically during this time of year, overnight lows fall to the lower 40s, but that doesn't mean some nights can't be cooler. 

In fact, according to the National Weather Service, the average last date of 32 degree temperatures is around April 19, but have been recorded as late as May 21 for Dayton. 

While we can see freezing temperatures into May, it's the warmer days that trigger the beginning of the growing season. 

Areas south of I-70 generally start their growing season before our northern communities. 

Because of this, on nights when temperatures drop close to freezing, the National Weather Service will begin to post freeze warnings. 

Dependent upon how far into the growing season we are, there may be time when only the southern counties get placed under a warning. 

As more vegetation is evident in northern counties, freeze warnings will then be issued if necessary. 

There could be a few days to a couple weeks lag between growing seasons in the Miami Valley.  

A few ways to keep your plants safe: 
  • Bring plants indoors to protect them from the colder temperatures 
  • Cover plants and bushes with sheets or burlap (not plastic) to trap heat from the soil, keeping the plant warmer through the night 
  • Remove cover early in the morning when temperatures climb above freezing 
  • Water plants to add moisture to the soil, this will help to insulate the plant's roots

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