Former Boy Scout volunteer arrested in connection to long-term human trafficking investigation

Former Boy Scout volunteer arrested in connection to long-term human trafficking investigation

MIAMI TWP. — A former volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America was arrested following long-term human trafficking investigation.

Ronald Hubers, 44, was arrested Wednesday on charges of pandering obscenity involving juveniles, according to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office.

TRENDING: What was that boom heard across the region? Here’s what we know now

Content Continues Below

Investigators including the Montgomery County RANGE Task Force executed a search warrant at a home in the 10,000 block of Brokenwoods Drive Wednesday.

Hubers was arrested at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, according to online jail records.

Hubers was a previous volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America, the organization confirmed today.

“We were deeply disturbed to learn of the allegations against this individual. While Mr. Hubers has not been a registered volunteer with Scouting for several years, upon learning of these reports we took immediate action to prohibit him from any future participation in our programs,” Boy Scouts of America said in a statement.

It’s unclear if his time with the Boy Scouts is related to his arrest.

He is facing initial charges of pandering obscenity involving juveniles but additional charges will be reviewed by the Montgomery County Prosecutor’s Office.

During the search warrant, investigators seized computers, computer equipment, cell phones, cameras, and two firearms.

The full statement from Boy Scouts of America:

“We were deeply disturbed to learn of the allegations against this individual. While Mr. Hubers has not been a registered volunteer with Scouting for several years, upon learning of these reports we took immediate action to prohibit him from any future participation in our programs. 

Nothing is more important than the safety of our youth members. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) also has a multi-layered process of safeguards informed by experts, including the following, all of which act as barriers to abuse: a leadership policy that requires at least two youth-protection trained adults be present with youth at all times and bans one-on-one situations where adults would have any interactions alone with children – either in person, online, or via text; a thorough screening process for adult leaders and staff including criminal background checks, and the prompt mandatory reporting of any allegation or suspicion of abuse to law enforcement.

The BSA also offers a 24/7 Scouts First Helpline (1-844-SCOUTS1) and email contact address (scouts1st@scouting.org) for help reporting suspected abuse or inappropriate behavior and to request funding for in-person counseling. 

For more information about the BSA's youth protection policies, please visit: www.scouting.org/youth-safety."