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Victim in Kettering house explosion, fire identified

Published: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 @ 4:50 AM

NewsCenter 7 used it's drone, SKY7, to obtain an aerial view of the damage to a house that exploded and caught fire early Tuesday morning.

UPDATE @ 12:50 p.m. (Dec. 5):

The Montgomery County Coroner’s Office has identified the woman killed in the house explosion and fire as Darlene Baumgardner, 58, of Kettering.

Authorities have released a couple of 911 calls relating to a house explosion and fire that left a woman dead from her injuries.

UPDATE @ 9:01 a.m. (Dec. 5):

The Montgomery County Coroner’s Office has been notified of a death from this morning’s house explosion, fire on North Claridge Drive.

No other information about the death has been released, pending notification of family, a spokesperson said.

FIRE SCENE: Kettering house on Claridge Drive fully involved

UPDATE @ 6:32 a.m. (Dec. 5):

A woman is in critical condition after being thrown from a home in an explosion and fire in Kettering, according to firefighters.

“She was thrown out of the house that exploded,” said Kettering Fire Chief Tom Butts, who added that the victim was found behind a neighbor’s house. “It sure appears like it could be a natural gas type explosion.”

Death confirmed following Kettering explosion, fire on North Claridge Drive. Chuck Hamlin/Staff

>> 4 killed in Kettering fire, cause determined years later

Firefighters responded to the house in the 400 block of North Claridge Drive shortly after 4:30 a.m. and found the home engulfed.

The victim was taken to Kettering Medical Center.

Ed Carter lives next to the house that exploded and said he was called after his daughter looked out the window to see the house on 

“I got a phone call from a frantic daughter a little bit before 5 a.m. saying the house next door blew up,” Carter said.

Debris is scattered on neighboring properties and firefighters said they are hoping once more daylight comes that they will be able to get a better idea of any damage to any other homes nearby.

Carter said he’s thankful his family is OK, but can’t believe some of the damage he’s seen.

“It’s hard to fathom, I mean this house is flattened. There’s nothing left of it,” Carter said.

Butts said neighbors have reported the woman was the only person that lived at the home.

UPDATE @ 5:49 a.m. (Dec. 5):

A woman was transported to a local hospital in critical condition following a house fire near the intersection of North Claridge and South Claridge drives in Kettering Tuesday, according to firefighters.

The first crew on the scene reported the house was engulfed when they arrived shortly after 4:30 a.m.

Debris from the house was found in a neighboring yard and neighbors said they heard an explosion before the fire was discovered.

“We heard an explosion,” said Chris Wettle, who lives down the street.  “We thought it was our neighbor’s house.”

Firefighters evacuated two neighboring homes as a precaution while battling the fire and some damage to those homes has been reported, according to initial reports.

UPDATE @5:05 a.m.

One person has been critically injured in a house fire, according to reports.

Two medics have been requested to the scene.

Crews continue to fight the fire. 

FIRST REPORT

Crews are battling a fully involved structure fire.

The fire was reported around 4:35 a.m. on Claridge Drive. Fire crews reported heavy smoke and flames upon arrival.

Initial reports indicate at least one neighboring house has been damaged by smoke and flames.  An explosion has been reported.

Two medics have been requested and at least one person was injured, according to reports.

This story will be updated as additional information becomes available.

Gradual weekend warm-up; Possible light showers to cause slick roads

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 5:14 AM

Gradual warm up this weekend, followed by an increased chance for rain.

>>WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Gradual warm-up this weekend
  • Wet Sunday into Monday
  • Colder with snow showers Tuesday

5 Day Forecast with Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs

DETAILED FORECAST

TODAY: Increasing clouds and breezy for the day with temperatures climbing to the lower 40s. However, winds will make it feel like the upper 20s to lower 30s during the afternoon. Areas of light drizzle and mist will develop tonight as temperatures dip into the mid 30s. Drivers should watch for isolated slick spots on overpasses and bridges. 

>>4 tricks to help avoid illness during big temperature changes

(Storm Center 7 Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs)

(Storm Center 7 Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs)

TOMORROW: We’ll experience cloudy skies with a chance for drizzle and fog. A few light showers will be possible as temperatures climb into the mid 40s.

(Storm Center 7 Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs)

>>5-Day Forecast

MONDAY: It’ll be mainly dry to start the day, but rain chances increase late morning into the afternoon. Gusty winds will be likely as temperatures soar into the lower 50s. 

TUESDAY: A colder, blustery day with the chance for a few passing snow showers or flurries. Highs will be in the mid-30s, but will feel like the teens and 20s. 

(Storm Center 7 Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs)

WEDNESDAY: Some sunshine make a return, but it will still be breezy and cold in the upper 30s. 

Government shuts down, negotiations expected through weekend

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 3:23 PM
Updated: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 12:11 AM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

The federal government shut down Saturday for the first time since 2013 late Friday, with a handful of Republicans and the vast majority of Democrats in the Senate opposing efforts to keep the federal government running for another month.

By a vote of 50-48, Senate Republicans fell far short of the 60 votes needed to end floor debate and clear the way for a vote on a bill approved Thursday by the House which would keep the federal government open until the middle of February.

Hundreds of housands of federal workers faced the possibility of being furloughed during a shutdown.

While most of the functions of the federal government will still operate – the mail will be delivered, Social Security checks will still go out, the military will still function – workers deemed “non-essential” would be asked not to go to work, and would be paid only after the federal government resumed operations.

RELATED: Five things to know if a shutdown happens

RELATED: Dreamers rally in Dayton to support DACA

At issue was what would be the fourth temporary spending bill passed by Congress since the fiscal year began in October.

That bill would also extend the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program, known as CHIP, for six years. Republicans included the measure as a sweetener aimed at attracting Democratic support.

At first, the plan seemed to work, with Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio indicating he’d likely support the bill. But Brown joined most Senate Democrats Friday in blocking a floor vote.

Brown was influenced in part by the announcement Friday that a handful of Republicans, including Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Jeff Flake of Arizona did not plan to vote for the bill. They had been working toward a separate measure aimed at extending a program that allows people brought to the United States illegally as children to stay, and called for a short-term bill that would keep the government open through early next week, expressing confidence that they could come up with a long term plan during that time.

Brown jumped, saying he’d support the shorter-term plan.

“We are very close to a bipartisan agreement, and we owe it to the people we work for to keep working and get the job done,” said Brown.

RELATED: 7 things to know about the Children’s Health Insurance Program

RELATED: Trump and Schumer end private talks with no deal in hand

But in agreeing to the shorter-term plan, he became the object of derision from Republicans who hope to unseat him later this year. They said by opting not to support the bill passed by the House, he was effectively voting against the six-year extension of CHIP.

Blaine Kelly of the Ohio Republican Party said Brown’s decision not to vote for the GOP plan “is a flip flop beyond belief, and puts the health insurance of nearly a quarter million Ohio children at risk.”

Jennifer Donohue, communications director for Brown, replied that CHIP would have passed “months ago” if Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, “had listened to Senator Brown, but instead they’re holding the program hostage and using Ohio kids as political leverage.”

Last December, Brown voted against a temporary spending bill that kept the government open because it only extended CHIP money for three months instead of five years.

While Republicans blamed Senate Democrats for the shutdown, a Washington Post-ABC News Poll released Friday indicated most Americans blamed the party in power: 48 percent of those polled blamed Republicans while 28 percent blamed Democrats.

Ohio Democrats, meanwhile, pointed out that Rep. Jim Renacci, R-Wadsworth, who is challenging Brown for Senate, voted for the measure that led to the federal government shutdown in 2013.

“If the government shuts down tonight, the blame will lay at the feet of Republicans in control of Washington, like Rep. Jim Renacci, who irresponsibly govern by crisis and play political games,” said Ohio Democratic Party spokesman Jake Strassberger.

Renacci and Senate Republican candidate Mike Gibbons were quick to strike back. James Slepian, a Renacci aide said “after Sherrod Brown vowed to shut down the government, cut off funding to our troops and deny health insurance to 9 million low income children, Senator Brown and his lackeys at the Ohio Democratic Party are terrified by the hell he’ll pay with Ohio voters.”

Gibbons said that “Sherrod Brown and Chuck Schumer are playing politics with people's lives for partisan advantage.”

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speaking on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” seemed puzzled that Democrats were holding up the bill in large part because of the immigration issue, saying “it’s an issue that hasn’t been resolved yet and it will take a little more time.” He backed moving the bill forward.

“This is not a good way to score political points,” Portman said. 

Despite the shutdown, much of the government will remain effectively operational, albeit on a smaller scale, at least in the short term. The mail will still get delivered, the post offices will remain open, the Army, Navy and Air Force operate as usual but active duty members will not be paid until the shutdown ends, and Americans receive their Social Security checks. Medicare and Medicaid continue to function.

The state in 2016 had 77,400 federal employees, of which 5,250 were on active duty with the Air Force. Air Force civilian employment was 13,838, almost all at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton.

During past partial shutdowns, some civilian workers were furloughed, although they were paid when the government re-opened. In the 2013 shutdown, 50 workers at the Defense Supply Center in Whitehall were furloughed.

In part, Democrats have adopted a strategy aimed at their political base which is demanding action on the Dreamers and wants more confrontation with Trump. By doing so, they are emulating the Republican strategy of 2013 in which the GOP closed the government in a futile effort to convince President Barack Obama to scrap his 2010 health law known as Obamacare.

“Smart Republicans have learned how stupid it is politically to shut down the government,” said one longtime Republican lobbyist in Washington. “You don’t win when you shut down the government.

The Republican said the Senate Democrat strategy was complicated when House Republicans overcame their vast differences and passed the temporary spending bill Thursday. Until then, Senate Democrats could justifiably argue that the GOP-controlled House could not keep the government open.

“It would have been one thing if the House failed,” the Republican said. “But once (House Speaker Paul) Ryan did the miraculous and passed a bill with votes from people who hate spending bills of any kind, it totally changed the dynamic.” 
 

Dayton traffic from the WHIO traffic center

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 12:35 AM
Updated: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 7:58 AM

Staff photo
Staff photo

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • No incidents to report.

Surface Street Incidents

  • On Springboro Pike at Miamisburg Centerville Road, reported injury crash around 7:55 a.m.

>> RELATED: WHIO App-Winter

>> RELATED: Check for delays or cancellations before heading to the airport

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west and east, Lane width restriction until Apr. 1, 2018. One lane will remain open on the ramp with a width of 11 feet.
  • I-70 between Upper Lewisburg Salem Road and Brooksville-Phillipsburg Road, Lane closure Jan. 22 - 29. One lane will remain open in each direction at all times. Shoulder closures Jan. 22 - Sept. 30. Both the inside and outside shoulders of I-70 will be closed during construction. 

Power restored near Miami Valley Hospital, UD student neighborhoods

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:17 PM
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 8:34 PM

Brown Street loses power

UPDATE @ 8:20 p.m.: DP&L crews are continuing to search for a possible cause of the power outage along Brown Street that affected 1,325 customers in total, spokesman Kevin Hall said. 

The outage hit about 6:50 p.m., he said. Electric service was restored to all affected customers shortly after 8 p.m.

UPDATE @ 7:39 p.m.: 

The DP&L online outage map now shows 126 customers without power along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the UD student neighborhoods, from Chambers Street to U.S. 35. 

A hospital administrator at MVH said the hospital is operating on generator power. 

Elevators there stopped immediately when the outage struck about 6:45 p.m., she said. Workers and security were able to get everyone off the cars, she said. 

No patients were put in danger because of the outage, she said.

INITIAL REPORT

Hundreds of businesses and residences along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the University of Dayton student neighborhoods, are without power. 

According to the Dayton Power & Light online outage map, nearly 1,200 customers are affected. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Guest lists being checked to track drug dealers

Calls began coming into the newsroom just before 7 p.m. 

We’re hearing the outage extends along Brown Street, from Chambers Street west to U.S. 35. 

Jimmy’s Ladder 11, in the 900 block of Brown, and Subway, in the 1100 block, are among the businesses in the dark. 

We have a call into DP&L for details about the possible cause of the outage.

Stay with whio.com for breaking news.