WATCH: Highway severely damaged after tanker truck explodes

Published: Thursday, June 01, 2017 @ 5:20 AM

SCENE: Tanker explodes after crash on Colorado highway

A busy stretch of Interstate 25 in Denver was severely damaged after a tanker truck caught fire and exploded Wednesday. The driver of the truck suffered injuries, but was pulled from the truck by passing motorists and workers.

RELATED: Tanker truck explodes after wrong-way crash on I-75 in Dayton

Firefighters responded to Interstate 25 in southern Denver around noon local time after the semi caught fire, CBS affiliate KCNC-TV reports. 

The station reports a preliminary investigation found a blown tire on the semi sparked the blaze, causing the tanker to explode, but an official cause was not released. 

RELATED: IWitness7 viewers capture Dayton I-75 crash, fire, explosion

A witness told KCNC-TV he saw the semi lose control and hit a barrier just before the fire started.

“When he came to a stop I could see fuel, on the road northbound,” said Dave Fretz, a witness to the incident. “It was smoking and there was some flames happening in the back part of it. I knew this guy was in a truck and I didn’t see him come out of the truck.”

VIDEO: ODOT camera captures I-75 crash, explosion

PHOTOS: Images from fiery wrong-way crash on I-75

Fretz told the station while he went to check on the driver’s side of the semi, two Colorado Department of Transportation workers had pulled the driver from the passenger’s side and were helping him away from the fire.

RELATED: Stunning video of Atlanta I-85 fire and bridge collapse 

Fretz said the driver was suffering from a head and arm injury, but the official condition of the driver was unavailable. 

All 10 lanes of the highway, five in each direction, were shut down for several hours for crews to extinguish the blaze, forcing over 200,000 daily commuters to be diverted around the scene. By the Wednesday evening commute, three lanes were open on the southbound side of Interstate 25, but the northbound lanes remained closed into Thursday morning. 

KCNC-TV reports the Colorado Department of Transportation will work overnight with hopes to reopen the remaining lanes by the Thursday morning commute. 

CDOT workers said damage to the highway on the southbound lanes went about three inches deep into the pavement, but crews had yet to evaluate the extend of damage to the northbound lanes. 

Officials said they will need to remove the toxic mixture of chemicals, foam, and water still in the roadway before repairs could be made. 

Five things to watch for in Congress this week

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 3:04 AM

With two weeks until Christmas, the to-do list is a long one for the Congress, as GOP lawmakers try to finish work on a sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code, fund the government into 2018, and look to deal with a number of other contentious issues that have eluded lawmakers and the White House, but it’s not clear how much the House and Senate will be able to accomplish before going home for the holidays

“If things don’t get done, we are going to have quite a catastrophe,” said Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH), one of many GOP lawmakers who remain confident that Republican leaders will find a way to reach a deal on tax reform.

“I think this is one that we’re going to get done,” said Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA). “There’s unanimity in the conference to get this done.”

Here is what lies ahead for lawmakers in the Congress:

1. GOP must move quickly to finish tax reform bill. If Republicans are going to get a tax reform bill on the President’s desk before Christmas, they don’t have much time. Lawmakers certainly don’t want to be on Capitol Hill after Friday the 22nd; the first formal meeting of the House-Senate tax reform “conference” committee is on Wednesday, but that’s really more for show. Behind the scenes, key GOP lawmakers have already been trying to reach agreements on final language in the bill. If you want a full rundown on the differences between the House and Senate versions, read this comparison from the Joint Committee on Taxation. There have already been a number of stories about mistakes and loopholes in the GOP tax reform plan – we’ll see if those get resolved as well. This is no slam dunk, but the odds still favor the GOP.

2. Next stop gap budget runs out on December 22. There isn’t enough time to write a full “Omnibus” spending bill (Speaker Ryan said that last week), so the question is more likely how much will Congress get done on funding the operations of the federal government, and how much gets booted into 2018. Republicans have been making noise about approving a funding bill for the military, keeping all other agencies on a temporary budget, and then adding in a bunch of year-end sweeteners to the bill. It’s also possible that such a deal could increase the ‘budget caps,’ allowing for a larger defense budget, and maybe more domestic spending as well. The idea of increasing spending just before the holidays does not sit well with more conservative Republicans. And what about DACA and the immigrant Dreamers? There could be a lot of wheeling and dealing in the days ahead.

3. Will there be more shoes dropping on Capitol Hill? After what was a historic week – where three members announced their resignations due to allegations of sexual misconduct – it’s not unreasonable to wonder if more stories will surface in coming days. There’s already pressure on Rep. Ruben Kihuen (D-NV) and Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-TX) to resign – an ethics probe was announced last Friday on Farenthold, who says he will pay back an $84,000 sexual harassment settlement with a former staffer. Over the weekend, reports surfaced about another possible taxpayer payout related to a harassment lawsuit, involving Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL). As a reporter, I cannot stress how unusual last week was on Capitol Hill. If you have one lawmaker announce a resignation, that’s a big deal. Two resignations was a major headline. And then a surprise third. One cannot discount the possibilities that more such stories are in the pipeline. Stay tuned.

4. From member of Congress to anti-filibuster PAC? Last Thursday, Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) stunned his colleagues by announcing his resignation, effective January 31. But on Friday, he decided to make it effective immediately, citing the hospitalization of his wife, after revelations that he had tried to get female staffers in his office to be a surrogate for his child (not a campaign surrogate). In between those events, a Minnesota television news crew that was in Washington to cover the resignation of Sen. Al Franken (D-MN), stumbled into Franks at their hotel, as they overheard the Arizona Republican on the phone soliciting big money donations to start a political action committee that would fight to get rid of the filibuster in the Senate, which Franks, and other more conservative Republicans in the House have been blaming for inaction on the GOP agenda. The news crew that stumbled into that story must still be shaking their heads about their luck.

5. Roy Moore and the Alabama U.S. Senate race. Tuesday is finally Election Day in the Yellowhammer State, and no matter what else is happening in the halls of Congress this week, the outcome of this race will be a big deal. If Moore wins, a lot of GOP Senators won’t like the outcome. If Democrat Doug Jones wins, that will be a setback for President Donald Trump, who tried to stir support for Moore during a Fright night rally in Pensacola, Florida. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell telegraphed last week that if Roy Moore wins, then the new Alabama Senator is certain to face a review by the Senate Ethics Committee. Alabama’s senior Senator, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL), made it clear again on Sunday that he wrote in someone else – instead of voting for Roy Moore. Just that part of the story is highly unusual, let alone all the other news stories that keep coming out about Moore’s past actions and beliefs. It would be an unprecedented situation if Moore wins, since so many GOP Senators have made it crystal clear that they want no part of him.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXpFbOiPuHg&w=640&h=390]

Can you find the camouflaged soldier hidden in this viral photo?

Published: Monday, December 11, 2017 @ 2:53 AM

Can you find the camouflaged soldier hidden in this viral photo? (Photo credit: British Army / Twitter)
British Army / Twitter
Can you find the camouflaged soldier hidden in this viral photo? (Photo credit: British Army / Twitter)(British Army / Twitter)

The British Army wants you to test its woodland camouflage. Do you see a soldier in this image?

>> See the tweet here

The British Army asked Twitter users to scan the photo — which reportedly was shot in Wales on the Section Commander’s Battle Course — to find the soldier in the scene.

>> Read more trending news 

A hint, in case you’re having any difficulty: The soldier is not standing up.

To make things a bit difficult, the soldier is wearing a woodland camouflage pattern designed to blend in with the misty forest terrain.

>> This coffee riddle has baffled the internet – can you solve it?

Is the British uniform good enough for you? If you haven’t found the answer yet, it’s here — the soldier lying prone, enveloped in mist, with just the perfectly round helmet giving any indication that it’s not all forest floor.

>> Click here or scroll down to see the answer
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Bedbugs love your dirty laundry, new study says

Published: Thursday, September 28, 2017 @ 6:31 PM

(Getty File Photo)
Meg Igarashi / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm
(Getty File Photo)(Meg Igarashi / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm)

If you think bed bugs only crawl through your sheets, think again. Those critters are fond of your dirty laundry, too, according to a new report. 

>> Read more trending news

Researchers from the University of Sheffield in England conducted an experiment, recently published in Science Reports, to determine possible causes of the spread of bed bugs. 

To do so, they placed four tote bags of clothing - two with dirty clothes and two with clean clothes - across two identical temperature-controlled rooms that contained bed bugs. They also pumped carbon dioxide into one room to simulate human breathing and examined both rooms over the course of four days. 

After analyzing the results, scientists found that bed bugs were twice as likely to latch onto the dirty laundry than the clean laundry in the room with the CO2. In the room without COS, bedbugs “were more likely to leave their refuge and initiate host-seeking behaviour,” scientists said in an article about the study. 

Scientists believe when bedbugs cling to clothing, the critters can easily travel from place to place, which causes them to spread. To prevent an infestation, they think travelers should carefully store their clothing, keeping them away from beds. 

“Our study suggests that keeping dirty laundry in a sealed bag, particularly when staying in a hotel, could reduce the chances of people taking bed bugs home with them, which may reduce the spread of infestations,” lead author William Hentley said in a statement.

Such prevention tactics can also help reduce extermination costs as bedbugs can be extremely difficult to get rid of. 

Teen trying to kill bed bug starts fire, causes $300,000 in damage, firefighters say

Published: Thursday, November 30, 2017 @ 12:27 PM

Teen Starts Fire, Causes $300,000 In Damage Trying To Kill Bed Bug

A Cincinnati teen trying to kill a bed bug is accused of starting a fire in his apartment complex that caused $300,000 in damage and displaced eight residents. 

WCPO in Cincinnati reported that the 13-year-old boy tried to kill the pest by lighting it on fire. His mattress burst into flames, and the fire spread to the building’s attic.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze, but one apartment was destroyed. Two other units had fire damage, and two others were damaged by smoke and water.

Three adults and five children were displaced by the incident, the news station reported. Firefighters said the American Red Cross was assisting the residents. 

>> Read more trending news

Bed bugs are flat, reddish-brown insects that feed on the blood of humans or animals. According to pest control company Orkin, they are usually found in cracks and crevices, including mattress seams, sheets and furniture. They also hide behind baseboards and in electrical plate outlets. 

They are often found in hotels because they can travel easily in luggage, purses and briefcases, the company’s website said

Signs of an infestation include not only the bugs, which are about the size of an apple seed, but also the empty skins that young bed bugs shed as they grow. They also leave behind their droppings. 

Homeowners may also discover bites on their bodies when they wake up. Bed bugs prefer to be active at night, when their hosts are asleep, Orkin said