Springfield nurse practitioner accused of operating clinic without license

Published: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 @ 11:13 AM
Updated: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 @ 1:53 PM

Springfield medical office under investigation on E. High Street.

UPDATE @ 1:50 p.m.

A Springfield nurse practitioner is under investigation for allegedly operating a pain management clinic without an appropriate license and illegally issuing prescriptions for controlled substances, according to the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy. 

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Investigators executed search warrants at the Springfield Primary Health Care on East High Street as well as the home of Douglas Shrewsbury on Scanlon Lane on Tuesday, the pharmacy board said in a media release. 

During the searches, investigators seized evidence, including prescription drugs and patient records, the pharmacy board said. 

No arrests have been made and charges from the investigation will be presented to the Clark County Prosecutor’s Office. 

Attempts to reach Shrewsbury for comments Tuesday were unsuccessful. 

UPDATE @ 12:15 p.m. 

Investigators with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office and the pharmacy board are also conducting an investigation at a home in the 1100 block of Scanlon Lane. 

The investigations at both locations are connected, according to officials. 

Additional details were not immediately available. We’ll continue to update this page as we learn more. 

FIRST REPORT

Investigators with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office and the pharmacy board are conducting an investigation at Springfield Primary Health Care on East High Street.

The investigation was ongoing at the medical offices around 10:45 a.m.

We’re working to learn what the investigation involves and will update this story as details are released.

New Carlisle moves ahead with tax request to fund fire/EMS

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 10:01 PM



BILL LACKEY / STAFF
(BILL LACKEY / STAFF)

Council members voted unanimously Wednesday night to move forward with a tax request to support the city’s fire and emergency medical service.

In a special meeting held at 7 p.m. in the Smith Park Shelter House, the council and Chief Steve Trusty discussed the needs of the city's fire department.

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Trusty cited low pay for personnel and rising costs of equipment among the department's challenges. 

If certified, the 3-mill, five-year levy would be be placed on the May 8 ballot. 

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If it’s approved, it would cost the owner of a $100,000 home $105 a year and would not be collected until 2019.

Hippo Kiss: Fiona’s smooch on canvas can be yours

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 9:04 PM



Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden
(Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden)

In celebration of the first birthday of Fiona — the premature hippopotamus who beat the odds and captured hearts around the globe — fans will get a chance to win a one-of-a-kind “Hippo Kiss” painting, and become an official Fiona parent.

>> Fiona the hippo turns 1: Cincinnati Zoo plans birthday bash

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is marking Fiona’s first birthday with a special ADOPT (Animals Depend on People Too) promotion. ADOPT parents help provide food, toys and fun enrichment items to the zoo’s animal family.

>> One thing answered by Fiona The Hippo’s show: How did she get her name?

Anyone who “adopts” Fiona will be entered into a drawing to win “Hippo Kiss,” the purple peck on canvas created by Fiona herself.

Fiona’s First Birthday ADOPT promotion ends Feb. 7, and the drawing is at noon Feb. 8. The winner will be contacted directly, according to the zoo.

2 males sought in Kettering home invasion robbery

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 6:11 PM

FROM SCENE: 2 males sought in Kettering home invasion robbery

Police are continuing to look for two males who committed a home invasion robbery on Hazel Avenue. 

Investigators don't know what led the invaders to pick the home they did Wednesday afternoon, Kettering Police Patrolman John Jung said. 

According to the preliminary investigation, the two males forced their way inside just before 4 p.m., knocked down the resident and took property, Officer Jung said. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton to close

A K-9 unit was called to the scene as part of the investigation and he said police are interviewing neighbors, hoping to get a description of the robbers. 

Jung asked that if you have information you believe will help in this investigation, please call Kettering police at 937-296-2555.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

Good Samaritan Hospital closing: Former nurse recalls ‘small, friendly place’

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 6:44 PM

Good Samaritan Hospital closing: Former nurse recalls ‘small, friendly place’

A former nurse who has spent a good portion of her career at Good Samaritan Hospital was "shocked" to hear Wednesday's announcement that Premier Health planned to close the facility. 

"I just cannot believe what I'm hearing," Rosa Lee Weinert said. The 89-year-old graduated from nursing school at the hospital in 1949 and worked there as a nurse until 1964. 

The Englewood resident said she still serves on the hospital's alumni board. 

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Weinert remembers her time on Philadelphia Avenue fondly, smiling as she remembered "the nuns who used to run the place" back with the hospital was a Catholic institution. 

"It was a small, friendly place back then," Weinert said. "It was a beautiful community." 

Weinert ran the heart-lung machine during open heart surgeries during her last four years at Good Samaritan. She marvels at all the instruments and machines nurses today use during surgeries. 

Weinert wasn't a fan of how the hospital's exterior changed throughout the years -- from a small, warm building with a circular drive to the large facility she sees today. 

She says it "boggles her mind" to think of the massive job of moving the services and patients from Good Samaritan to other Premier Health properties. 

"I just cannot imagine Miami Valley [Hospital] assuming all of the patients and all of the care that is given at Good Samaritan. I can't imagine another building incorporating that," Weinert said. 

As of late Wednesday afternoon, Premier Health hasn't offered a public plan for how it will accomplish that, just that the hospital will likely close sometime toward the end of 2018.