Montgomery County receives most grant money to support homeless Ohioans

Published: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 @ 4:59 AM

The Ohio Development Services Agency is providing grants to 72 local organizations to support homeless prevention, emergency shelters and permanent housing initiatives.

RELATED: Volunteers take to the streets to help homeless in dangerously cold weather

According to a release, Montgomery County will receive the most grant money with more than $1.2 million going toward two entities for homeless crisis response programs. 

In total, more than $25.8 million will support shelters for the homeless and help homeless Ohioans find permanent housing.

Grants from the Homeless Crisis Response Program will help 50 non-profit and local government agencies operate emergency shelters and quickly move individuals from emergency shelters to permanent housing. Approximately 39,000 Ohioans will be assisted through the program, with funds coming from the Ohio Housing Trust Fund and the Federal Emergency Solutions Grant program. 

RELATED: Warren County retirement community plans another $16M in development

Grants from the Supportive Housing Program will help 31 non-profit agencies transition homeless Ohioans to permanent housing or provide permanent supportive housing to homeless people with disabilities. This program will assist approximately 5,300 Ohioans. Funding for the program is from the Ohio Housing Trust Fund.

"We're helping homeless Ohioans get back on their feet," said David Goodman, Director of the Ohio Development Services Agency.

In addition to Montgomery County, other counties with local agencies receiving grants include: 

  • Butler County: Serve City in Hamilton $302,400 to homeless crisis response program
  • Champaign County: Caring Kitchen Inc. $109,500 to homeless crisis response program
  • Greene County: Greene County Housing Program, Inc. $80,800 to homeless crisis response program and $41,600 to supportive housing program
  • Miami County: Family Abuse Shelter of Miami County Inc. $627,600 to homeless crisis response program

Ohio college president related to suspect in California captive children case 

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 12:15 PM

13 Siblings Held Captive In California "House of Horrors"

UPDATE @ 12:04 p.m. (Jan. 19):

An Ohio Christian college President related to the father accused of shackling his own children in their California home has taken a leave of absence from his position, according to the New York Post.

Dr. Randy Turpin, president of Valor Christian College in Canal Winchester, near Columbus,  is the brother of David Turpin, the father accused in the case.

This news organization received a statement from the college this afternoon.

“The Valor Christian College community joins with millions of Americans who are shocked and saddened by these terrible stories from California and we are praying for the full recovery of all involved,” the college said in a prepared statement

UPDATE @ 1:20 p.m. (Jan. 16): Officials said at a news conference Tuesday afternoon that the 13 siblings taken from a California home after they were held captive by their parents for an undisclosed period of time are recovering.

The siblings, who range in age from 2 to 29, were in stable condition Tuesday.

“They’re very friendly, they’re very cooperative and I believe that they’re hopeful that life will get better for them after this event,” said Mark Uffer, CEO of the Corona Regional Medical Center.

Riverside County Sheriff's Department Capt. Greg Fellows said Louise Anna Turpin, the mother of the children, was “perplexed” when police arrived at the family’s home Sunday. Authorities said they had received no prior calls to the house and said there were no early indications that either Linda Anna Turpin or her husband, 57-year-old David Allen Turpin, had any history of mental illness.

Original report: A California couple was arrested Sunday after 13 siblings, ranging in age from 2 to 29, were allegedly held captive in a home, with several children “shackled to their beds with chains and padlocks in dark and foul-smelling surroundings,” the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department said Monday.

>> Read more trending news

In a news release, the Sheriff’s Department said David Allen Turpin, 57, and Louise Anna Turpin, 49, were arrested and charged with torture and child endangerment. Bail was set at $9 million apiece, according to the news release.

Riverside County Sheriff's Department Capt. Greg Fellows said Louise Anna Turpin, the mother of the children, was “perplexed” when police arrived at the family’s home Sunday. Authorities said they had received no prior calls to the house and said there were no early indications that either Linda Anna Turpin or her husband, 57-year-old David Allen Turpin, had any history of mental illness.

Original report: A California couple was arrested Sunday after 13 siblings, ranging in age from 2 to 29, were allegedly held captive in a home, with several children “shackled to their beds with chains and padlocks in dark and foul-smelling surroundings,” the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department said Monday.

>> Read more trending news

In a news release, the Sheriff’s Department said David Allen Turpin, 57, and Louise Anna Turpin, 49, were arrested and charged with torture and child endangerment. Bail was set at $9 million apiece, according to the news release.

David Turpin’s parents, James and Betty Turpin of West Virginia, told ABC News they were surprised and shocked at the allegations, KABC reported.

According to the California Department of Education website, David Turpin is listed as principal of the Sandcastle Day School, which was operated out of his home. The address listed for the school is the same residence where the 13 victims were discovered, CNN reported.

The school opened March 21, 2011, according to the website, and was categorized as a private school for students in grades one through 12.

Badin High School plans $1.8M expansion as enrollment grows

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 11:47 AM


            Butler County’s only Catholic high school is expanding this year to better handle its growing enrollment. This week officials at Badin High School released more details about its first campus expansion since 2006 including a $1.8 million construction project that will add a new “Student Development Center.”(Provided illustration)
Butler County’s only Catholic high school is expanding this year to better handle its growing enrollment. This week officials at Badin High School released more details about its first campus expansion since 2006 including a $1.8 million construction project that will add a new “Student Development Center.”(Provided illustration)

Butler County’s only Catholic high school is expanding this year to better handle its growing enrollment.

This week, officials at Badin High School released more details about the school’s first campus expansion since 2006, including a $1.8 million construction project that will add a new “Student Development Center.”

MORE: Badin High School celebrates 50th anniversary

“The new Student Development Center is another example of Badin making effective strides to enhance our facilities,” said Dirk Allen, spokesman for Badin High School.

“We’re very excited about it. Classes, facilities, opportunities for students, all of that comes together to create an outstanding educational experience for the Badin student body,” said Allen.

MORE: Badin High School renews ties with Sister of Notre Dame

Construction on the new, one-story, 8,000-square-foot center will begin this summer and is projected to be done by Christmas.

“Our enrollment continues to grow. We were at 449 students in 2009-2010, (and) our enrollment has grown every year since then. We are at 575 this year and expect to be over 600 next year,” he said.

MORE: Looking back on Badin’s historic, perfect basketball season

“The building project will be very helpful (and) students will no longer have to walk outside between the main building and the Pfirman Center in inclement weather.”

The new center will allow two former classrooms - converted into office space - to return to instructional spaces.

Daytonian makes splash on magazine cover, calls mom ‘doyenne of Dayton, Ohio’

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 11:33 AM

CBS star Allison Janney was inducted into the Dayton Region's Walk of Fame. Video by Amelia Robinson

One of Dayton’s favorite daughters graces the latest cover of a magazine that makes it into 22 million homes. 

Oakwood-raised movie and television star Allison Janney and Anna Faris, her co-star on CBS’s “Mom,” are on the cover of this Sunday’s “Parade” magazine. 

Oakwood-raised actress Allison Janney and Anna Faris, her co-star of CBS' "Mom" on the cover of the Jan. 21 edition on Parade magazine.(Parade)

>> Allison Janney: “Dayton spawns great people” 

You’ll be able to find Parade this Sunday in the “Dayton Daily News” and thousands of other newspapers around the country.  

“Mom” airs at 9 p.m. on Thursdays on WHIO-TV Channel 7.

Janney talks about feminism and her mom in the Parade story: 

Janney’s mom, Macy, was a former actress who decided to forego an acting career to raise her family—“back when that’s what women did,” she says. But Macy was “the doyenne of Dayton, Ohio,” with a strong feminist stance who was on the boards of multiple entertainment, arts and educational programs. Today, Janney loves it when people tell her, “You sound just like your mom.” 

 

Janney, a former Miami Valley School student, recently won a Golden Globe for

for playing LaVona Harding, figure skater Tonya Harding’s mother, in the dramatic dark comedy “I, Tonya.”

>> MORE: Famous Dayton actress reacts for glory in Tonya Harding film 

>> RELATED: Dayton’s Jonathan McNeal shares his can’t-miss movies of 2017

Faris and Janney play daughter and mother on the CBS show “Mom.”

MORE HIGHLIGHTS FROM PARADE: 

Scaring boyfriends: Faris says her mom, Karen, was “crazy loyal,” “ferocious,” encouraged her imagination and always instilled in her the idea that “you will never be dependent on a man.” She adds, “I think that scared some boyfriends—I mean, not that I had boyfriends.” 

Telling her story. One of Faris’ side projects is her podcast, “Anna Faris Is Unqualified,” which she started as “a weird hobby” with her producing partner, Sim Sarna, in 2015. “I worked hard to be independent,” says Faris, who separated from actor Chris Pratt in August 2017 after eight years of marriage. “So the podcast has given me a lot of freedom. I’m not waiting for the next role to come around.” 

>> Dayton favorite Allison Janney wins first Golden Globe for movie role

Award buzz. Janney is soaking in awards buzz after winning a Golden Globe for her supporting role as the mother of disgraced figure skater Tonya Harding (played by Margot Robbie) in the movie I, Tonya. A former figure skater herself, Janney says she well recalls the 1994 incident depicted in the film—in which Harding’s rival Nancy Kerrigan was attacked and sidelined by a thug hired by Harding’s ex-husband and her bodyguard. “I was floored that that sort of thing could happen in the world of figure skating—a very refined, elegant sport rocked by this crazy incident.”

>> This local woman dropped 243 pounds. But she said real beauty didn’t come until her life crumbled.

 

Higher water, sewer rates in effect for Montgomery County customers

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 1:09 PM

Montgomery County is planning annual water and sewer rate increases, starting with a 14 percent hike to take effect on Jan. 1. NICK BLIZZARD/STAFF PHOTO
Staff Writer
Montgomery County is planning annual water and sewer rate increases, starting with a 14 percent hike to take effect on Jan. 1. NICK BLIZZARD/STAFF PHOTO(Staff Writer)

Customers who receive water and sewer services through Montgomery County can expect to see rate increases reflected in their first bills of the year.

The county announced in November that the combined water and sewer rate would go up by about an average of 14 percent this year.

BREAKING NEWS: Ohio flu cases continue to climb

Rates will jump another 5.6 percent on average starting in 2019 and each following year through 2022.

This means the average residential customer in the county will end up paying about $8 a month or $24 more in their quarterly bill, according to county estimates.

The Montgomery County system provides drinking water and fire prevention for about 250,000 residents. Most customers are in Centerville, Harrison Twp., Kettering, Miami Twp., Riverside, Trotwood and Washington Twp.

RELATED: Why Montgomery County water, sewer customers will pay more

Over the last eight years, the county has had an average rate increase of 1.25 percent per year, which is a lower increase than the state average of four percent per year.

Montgomery County Environmental Services spokeswoman Brianna Wooten said this was a conscious decision.

“When the Great Recession hit, we were trying to figure out how we could help people. You know people were having trouble staying in their homes at that time, so we decided to hold down water rates until things turned around,” Wooten said.

According to Montgomery County’s Environmental Services director, Pat Turnbull, the rate structure has also changed in the new year. The rate has gone from 20 percent fixed charges to 40 percent and 80 percent consumption-based charges to 60 percent.

TRENDING NEWS: Tough decisions led to Good Samaritan Hospital closing 

Because of the change in ratio, those with bigger meters will pay more.

“For instance,” Wooten said, “hospitals or a business that have bigger needs and cost more to maintain will pay an appropraite amount for the larger demand they place on the system.”

The county maintains 1,400 miles of water mains and 1,200 miles of sewer mains. The increase will fund maintenance and new construction of these water and sewer lines, county officials said.

Water main breaks have been increasing — there have been more than 50 in Montgomery County since the beginning of the year. On a single day last week, there were 19, said Wooten.

This is not only because of the cold weather but because of outdated infrastructure.

Officials estimate about $750 million, generated from the rate increase, will be spent over the next 20 years to maintain and replace aging portions of that infrastructure.

A project that is in the planning stages is the upgrading of the sewer system on Dryden Road in Moraine. It is scheduled to be finished in Dec. 2021.

RELATED: Brutal cold has been rough on local water mains

“We are just reaching that point — similar to the roof on your house — when you’re having to patch leaks all the time, you get to a place where it’s time to put a new roof on,” Turnbull said.

Wooten said it is important for customers on autopay to be aware of the change, so that they can anticipate and plan for the change in their bank accounts.