CLOSINGS AND DELAYS:

Bam Redemption Center International, Brookville Full Gospel Church of God, Greater Prayer Garden Church of God in Christ, Little Rock Missionary Baptist Church, Maple Avenue Church of God,

INTERACTIVE MAP: Wrong-way crashes in the area

Published: Sunday, May 01, 2016 @ 10:12 AM
Updated: Sunday, May 01, 2016 @ 10:12 AM

Wrong-way crashes are on the rise in Ohio, many of them in the Dayton and Cincinnati areas. This map gives the location, picture and extra information on some of the major wrong-way crashes.

More cases of dog flu being reported in the Miami Valley

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 3:52 PM

Dog Flu Fast Facts

Cases of dog flu are now being reported to Miami Valley veterinarians as the virus starts to spread more nationwide, officials said Wednesday.

As a result local doctors are taking steps to educate pet owners about how they can protect their furry friends. 

At Dayton South Veterinary Clinic, the first thing pet owners see when they enter the facility is a sign that lists the symptoms of dog flu.

It then asks owners not to go any further if their pets have any of the symptoms to avoid infecting other animals with the virus. 

In addition, Dr. Daniel Brauer at the clinic insists that his patients make sure their dogs get their annual flu shots.

“There's even been some concerned cases from a doggy daycare center here in Dayton, in the Dayton area,” he said. “People are coming in now that were associated with that daycare center to have their pets vaccinated, because they're worried.” 

Unlike human flu, dog flu is year round, but recently a strand of avian flu spreads to dogs in the U.S., and there’s an uptick in cases nationwide. 

“If the pets are unvaccinated, you definitely don't want to take them to daycare centers, kennels,” Brauer said. 

That’s because the virus can live in an environment for up to 48 hours, he said.

“Your pet just needs to sniff it, and they will get it if they’re not vaccinated, Brauer said. 

South Charleston boy, 8, dies in possible bathtub drowning, sheriff’s office says

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 3:53 PM

Grady Neff. Contributed photoFOR THE FULL STORY, GO TO SpringfieldNewsSun.com.
Staff Writer
Grady Neff. Contributed photoFOR THE FULL STORY, GO TO SpringfieldNewsSun.com.(Staff Writer)

An 8-year-old South Charleston boy died last week in a possible bathtub drowning.

A visitation for Grady Neff, a student at Miami View Elementary School, will take place from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 18, at the Clark County Fairgrounds Mercantile Annex Building.

“Everybody that knew Grady loved him,” the family said in a statement. 

>>MORE: Southeastern school to start building new gym soon

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office has ruled out anything criminal, Lt. Kristopher Shultz said, but are continuing their investigation to see what might have caused the possible drowning.

Grady had a seizure and his death is a tragedy, the family’s statement says.

FOR THE FULL STORY, GO TO SpringfieldNewsSun.com.

 

KITTY NEWS: Fairborn getting its very own cat cafe 

Published: Tuesday, November 07, 2017 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 3:46 PM

Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.
Photo: The City of Fairborn.
Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.(Photo: The City of Fairborn.)

Fairborn will soon have something to purrrr about. 

StreetCats, a volunteer-driven organization, is planning to open a “cat cafe” at 14 N. Third St. in downtown Fairborn.

>> RELATED: 22 reasons to visit Fairborn

The cafe/cat resource center is part of a tactical approach  between the city and several agencies to address the community’s stray and homeless cat population.

It will allow people a chance to play with cats, Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson said in the recent Facebook Live  message he delivered while covered in purring cats and kittens. 

>> MORE: Dayton’s first ‘catfe’ opening soon — and here are its first tenants  

“It is not only a fun thing, but also a very important thing we are trying to do,” Anderson said in the video. “Fairborn is getting creative.” 

The cat cafe is set to open in January with the hope to expand to a larger space in the future. 

In addition to cats, there will be art classes, yoga and free WiFi, plus coffee and baked goods. 

Anderson said the cat cafe is a way to address the city’s on-going issues with homeless and stray cats in a humane way. 

The organization will help find new homes for displaced house cats and offer services that will allow cats to be dropped off to be neutered and released, said Anderson, a self-proclaimed “cat person.”

“StreetCats aims to become a lightning rod for change, a clearinghouse for information and a creative place to connect interested community members,” an email to this news organization from Anderson said. 

StreetCats will be housed in city-owned property near that city’s kitchen incubator and a co-working space in the former site of Roush's Restaurant.

The initiative has the support of a number of animal groups, Elisabeth Fitzhugh of Blue’s Mews Siamese Cat Rescues told this news organization. 

“I am actually thrilled by what (Anderson) is doing,” she said.

>> RELATED: This new Fairborn store offers horrifying oddities

>> RELATED: Pepsi moving 150 jobs to Fairborn, closing Dayton, Springfield sites

Fairborn City Manager Rob Anderson recently announced the StreetCats cat cafe. The initiative is design to help address the city's stray and homeless cat issues. Photo: The City of Fairborn.(Photo: The City of Fairborn.)

County’s highest property values? Washington Twp. now tops Kettering

Published: Thursday, December 14, 2017 @ 11:38 AM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 3:44 PM

Washington Twp. had the most 2017 gains in property values in the county. Realtor Jeff Spring stands inside a 17,000-square foot home in Washington Twp. that was for sale. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Washington Twp. had the most 2017 gains in property values in the county. Realtor Jeff Spring stands inside a 17,000-square foot home in Washington Twp. that was for sale. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

After factoring in new construction, Washington Twp. had the most 2017 gains in property values in the county, according to a final analysis by the Montgomery County Auditor’s Office.

During a tentative report on values over the summer, Kettering held the mantle. But the final triennial review shows Washington Twp. up more than $270 million, and Kettering gained $218 million. Washington Twp. also got a boost from a $15.5 million Board of Revision increase to the value of Whole Foods Plaza.

RELATED: Montgomery County property values rebound from historic drop

“We are seeing values increase countywide. That’s not true of every neighborhood, and it’s not true of every community,” said Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith. “But most communities across the county are seeing increases.”

Because of a rebound in housing sales, property values rose or held even in all but four of Montgomery County’s 28 jurisdictions, Keith told about 70 local officials Thursday.

The final values approved by the state department of taxation will determine how much money local jurisdictions and school districts can expect to receive from the unvoted portion of local taxes.

Value changes will result in about $4.1 million in more revenue spread across the county’s jurisdictions, according to the auditor’s office. School districts will see more than half that, including Centerville’s, estimated to get an additional $657,517, and Kettering, $466,554. Three districts, Dayton, New Lebanon and Trotwood-Madison are expected to see a slight decrease.

By percentage, Oakwood’s values – buoyed almost entirely by past residential sales – rose the most, nearly 13 percent.

Final values dropped in Jefferson Twp., Perry Twp., Jackson Twp. and Harrison Twp. But the values dipped in those county’s more rural townships primarily due to a change in the way agricultural land is taxed. The formula was changed to ease the burden on farmers, some who had seen taxes climb as much as 300 percent in recent years. The change resulted in about a 30 percent reduction – or $82 million – decline in agricultural land values.

RELATED: Home values have risen in all Montgomery County communities but one

The gain in values countywide will mean an increase for some in the unvoted portion of property taxes. The owner of a $100,000 house that increased in value 6 percent from the last review will pay about $19 a year more. Currently, that homeowner pays about $306. The inside millage accounts typically for about 10 percent of an overall property tax bill, according the auditor’s office.