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Drugs, alcohol potential factors in wrong-way crash on I-75 in Dayton

Published: Saturday, November 18, 2017 @ 4:40 AM
Updated: Sunday, November 19, 2017 @ 4:20 AM

UPDATE @ 4:13 a.m.

Drugs or alcohol may be a factor in a Saturday morning wrong-way crash in Dayton that sent three to the hospital. 

A crash report reveals Glenn Ellis, 47, of Dayton, was driving northbound in the center, southbound lane of I-75 when he struck a southbound Toyota Prius. 

The driver of the Toyota swerved to avoid Ellis' oncoming minivan, and in doing so avoided a head-on collision, according to the report. 

Three people including Ellis and the driver and passenger in the Toyota were taken to Miami Valley Hospital from the scene. 

In their report, police said the crash remains under investigation while Ellis' lab results are processed. 

We are working to learn the conditions of each victim.

EARLIER REPORT

At least two people are at Miami Valley Hospital following a wrong-way crash on I-75 Saturday morning, according to dispatchers. 

Crews were sent to the two-car crash on southbound I-75 at West Third Street just before 2 a.m. 

Dispatchers said their call center received reports of a wrong-way driver shortly before the crash. 

>> 911 callers warn of wrong-way driver on SB I-75 prior to fiery crash

It is unknown how many people were injured, but three medics responded to the scene, according to dispatchers. 

The conditions of the two confirmed victims remain unknown. 

We will update this story as new details become available.

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LOCAL IMPACT: Government shutdown threatens 100th birthday party for Springfield veteran

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:33 PM

Government shutdown threatens 100th birthday party for Springfield veteran

Kevin Black hadn’t thought about how the possibility of a government shutdown would affect his family.

World War II veteran Thomas Eubanks of Springfield turns 100 on Jan. 23. To celebrate, his grandson, Black, organized a birthday party for him at the Air Force Museum on Saturday.

With the possibility of the government shutting down tonight, the museum may not open, and the outlook of the party is up in the air.

“I don’t like the playing politics on this,” Black said. “They’re just playing games.”

RELATED: With no deal on shutdown, GOP accuses Sherrod Brown of flip-flop

The possible museum closure hadn’t occurred to Black or his family until this news organization contacted him about the party, which he had asked us to cover.

His family wasn’t the only ones uncertain of what will happen next.

Diana Bachert, spokeswoman for the Air Force Museum, said Friday night in a statement there is currently no order for the museum to shut down.

“However, we will follow procedures for an orderly shutdown when and how we are directed to do so,” Bachert said.

If Congress fails to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution (CR), a bill that appropriates money to different federal departments and programs, some federal agencies could come to a standstill.

MORE: What if UD and Wright State played this year in a Gem City Jam?

Black’s plan is for Congressman Warren Davidson to present Eubanks with a certificate, then Black will present his grandfather with letters from President Donald Trump and Gov. John Kasich.

But if there is no CR passed, Congress plans to stay in Washington and try to come to an agreement, meaning Davidson may have to miss the party.

Black said his grandfather doesn’t know about the planned celebration at the museum.

“He just thinks that a bunch of the grandkids are taking him to the museum,” Black said.

And he probably will continue to keep plans a secret, in case the museum isn’t open.

“(Eubanks) was sick a couple weeks after Christmas, and we didn’t think he was going to be able to go (to the museum). But he wants to go if they don’t shut down,” Black said.

MORE: What if a government shutdown happened? Five things to know

Eubanks is a widower; his wife Suzanne died in 2000. They were married for 59 years.

In WWII he served as tail gunner in the European theatre, an area of heavy fighting across the continent. He flew 13 combat missions from Knettishall Airfield in England.

“Tail gunner was the worst place to be,” said Black, who is retired from the Air Force.

He worked as a building inspector for Springfield for several years.

He lives in Oakwood Village Retirement Home in Springfield. He has four children, nine grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and four great, great-grandchildren.

“He’s got all his wits about him,” Black said.

Government shutdown: Will I still get my mail?

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 5:33 PM

Packages advance on a conveyor belt as they are sorted at the U.S. Postal service’s Royal Palm Processing and Distribution Center on December 4, 2017 in Opa Locka, Florida.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Packages advance on a conveyor belt as they are sorted at the U.S. Postal service’s Royal Palm Processing and Distribution Center on December 4, 2017 in Opa Locka, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)(Palm Beach Post Staff Writer)

Hundreds of thousands of federal employees could be barred from working if Congress can’t agree to a budget plan and avoid a shutdown.

But the country’s more than 500,000 postal service workers won’t be among them. 

Mail service will continue uninterrupted, even during a government shutdown. 

That’s because the U.S. Postal Service is not funded by taxpayer dollars for everyday operations.

MORE COVERAGE:

With no deal on shutdown, GOP accuses Sherrod Brown of flip-flop

Will a shutdown happen? Wright-Patterson is in a holding pattern

Fears grow as shutdown deadline nears

Temporary funding prevents shutdown but hurts military, officials say

No serious injuries among children in Butler County school bus-truck collision

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:35 PM
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:43 PM

School bus rear ended by truck in Trenton

UPDATE @ 4:40 p.m.: At least a couple of students are receiving medical attention in the pickup truck-school bus collision on Wayne Madison Road, but there are no serious injuries, Edgewood Schools Spokeswoman Pam Pratt said. 

The children are from Edgewood Elementary, she said, and they are in grades 2 through 5. 

District officials are telephoning parents and guardians to arrange rides home, Pratt said.

A pickup truck rear ended an Edgewood school bus Friday, Jan. 19 on Wayne Madison Road in Trenton. Several students were transported to the hospital with minor injuries and the driver of the pickup was transported to the hospital. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

INITIAL REPORT

Police and medic crews are at a collision in the 3200 block of Wayne Madison Road involving a school bus and a pickup truck. 

Several of the children on the bus have complained of neck and back pain. Medical personnel are evaluating the children and are taking some to a hospital. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Tough decisions led to Good Samaritan closing

Crews were dispatched just after 4 p.m. on the report of a vehicle accident that been described as a pickup truck that rear-ended a school bus. 

The accident occurred near Noah's Ark Child Development Center, 3259 Wayne Madison Road. 

Edgewood Schools Superintendent Russ Fussnecker and other district officials are on the way to the scene.

We have a crew on the way to check out the accident. We will update this developing report.

Badin High School plans $1.8M expansion as enrollment grows

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 11:47 AM
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 5:13 PM


            Butler County’s only Catholic high school is expanding this year to better handle its growing enrollment. This week officials at Badin High School released more details about its first campus expansion since 2006 including a $1.8 million construction project that will add a new “Student Development Center.”(Provided illustration)
Butler County’s only Catholic high school is expanding this year to better handle its growing enrollment. This week officials at Badin High School released more details about its first campus expansion since 2006 including a $1.8 million construction project that will add a new “Student Development Center.”(Provided illustration)

Butler County’s only Catholic high school is expanding this year to better handle its growing enrollment.

This week, officials at Badin High School released more details about the school’s first campus expansion since 2006, including a $1.8 million construction project that will add a new “Student Development Center.”

MORE: Badin High School celebrates 50th anniversary

“The new Student Development Center is another example of Badin making effective strides to enhance our facilities,” said Dirk Allen, spokesman for Badin High School.

“We’re very excited about it. Classes, facilities, opportunities for students, all of that comes together to create an outstanding educational experience for the Badin student body,” said Allen.

MORE: Badin High School renews ties with Sister of Notre Dame

Construction on the new, one-story, 8,000-square-foot center will begin this summer and is projected to be done by Christmas.

Allen said the new center “will feature a student commons for use before, during and after school meetings, group projects and a much needed study space. The guidance office will vacate a classroom in the school building and will move to the new Hamilton Community Foundation College and Career Center – a state-of-the-art facility with computer work stations and a meeting space for colleges to meet with students.”

“Our enrollment continues to grow. We were at 449 students in 2009-2010, (and) our enrollment has grown every year since then. We are at 575 this year and expect to be over 600 next year,” he said.

MORE: Looking back on Badin’s historic, perfect basketball season

“The building project will be very helpful (and) students will no longer have to walk outside between the main building and the Pfirman Center in inclement weather.”

The new center will also allow two former classrooms - converted into office space - to return to instructional spaces.