CLOSINGS AND DELAYS:

Central Christian Church-Kettering, Dayton Christian School, Greater Love Christian Church, Greater St. John M.B. Church, Huber Heights Schools, Moraine Seniors Citizens Club, Piqua Baptist Church, Residence in Praise Fine Arts Center, S.H.I. Integrative Med. Massage Sc., St. Patrick's Catholic Church, Tipp Monroe Community Services, Xenia Grace Chapel,

Hungry Dayton resident dupes 2 delivery drivers on same day

Published: Monday, November 20, 2017 @ 7:17 AM

Dayton resident steals two delivery orders

Two Dayton delivery drivers were duped and had food orders stolen from the same apartment on Lakebend Drive in Dayton. 

Around 1:20 a.m. Nov. 19, a Domino’s Pizza delivery driver reported he had a $12 pizza stolen from him as he went to deliver it to an apartment in the 3800 block of Lakebend Drive. He said the female resident opened the door and snatched the pizza out of his hands before shutting the door again. 

TRENDING: Dayton business owner uses AK-47 to exchange gunfire with burglars

The 33-year-old male went back to his store to report the theft to his manager. When they called the customer back she hung up on them. 

Then around 2:50 p.m. Nov. 19, Dayton police were notified by a Dragon City employee that a female resident at the same apartment on Lakebend Drive ordered $35 worth of food and didn’t pay when it was delivered. 

When the 52-year-old male worker knocked on the door to get payment, the resident gave back half the order and said it was the wrong — still not offering any payment.

WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

The female is described as being about 30 years old, standing between 5 feet 2 inches and 5 feet 4 inches, weighing between 130 and 150 pounds and having curly black hair.

Trump physical results: 6 things to know

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 5:16 PM

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 16:  U.S. President Donald Trump speaks as he stops by a Conversations with the Women of America panel at the South Court Auditorium of Eisenhower Executive Office Building January 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. The three-part panel features ÒAmerican women from various backgrounds and experiences who will speak with high-level women within the Trump Administration, about what has been accomplished to date to advance women at home, and in the workplace.Ó  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 16: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks as he stops by a Conversations with the Women of America panel at the South Court Auditorium of Eisenhower Executive Office Building January 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. The three-part panel features ÒAmerican women from various backgrounds and experiences who will speak with high-level women within the Trump Administration, about what has been accomplished to date to advance women at home, and in the workplace.Ó (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)(Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is in excellent health and likely to finish his term in office without any medical issues, a presidential doctor said Tuesday at a news conference, four days after the president underwent a physical exam.

>> Read more trending news

“The president's overall health is excellent," White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson said Tuesday.

Here are six things to know about the results of the president’s physical:

Jackson: ‘He had great findings across the board’

Trump is in “very, very good health,” Jackson said Tuesday. 

“(I have) no concerns for his heart health,” the presidential physician said. “There are many good things that came from his exam, I think he had great findings across the board. “

Jackson said Trump’s good health is likely to last through “the remainder of this tern, and even for the remainder of another term, if he’s elected.” He said he based his assessment on the president’s cardiac results.

“He falls into a category that portends years of event-free living,” Jackson said. “He has incredibly good genes, and that’s just the way God made him.”

Cognitive screening showed no issues

Jackson said he conducted a cognitive screening on Trump at the president’s request, although he felt the test was unnecessary.

“I’ve spent almost every day in the president’s presence,” said Jackson, whose office is near Trump’s. “I’ve got to know him pretty well and I had absolutely no concerns about his cognitive ability or neurological functions.”

He said that in all his conversations with Trump, the president has been “very articulate.”

“I’ve never known him to repeat himself around me,” Jackson said. “He says what he wants to say and speaks his mind.”

Infamous slurred speech incident might have been caused by medication

A December incident in which the president sounded as though he was slurring his speech while announcing a policy shift in Israel was probably due to a medication, Jackson said.

>> Related: Trump’s slurred speech: Is it loose-fitting dentures, dry mouth or something else?

“We evaluated him, we checked everything out and everything was normal,” Jackson said, adding that the incident was likely caused because the president needed water.

He said prior to the Dec. 7 incident, he gave Trump Sudafed, which might have “inadvertently dried up his secretions.”

Why Did President Trump Slur His Words in a Recent Speech?

Trump working to lose 10-15 pounds

At 6-foot-3 and 239 pounds, the president has a body mass index of 29.9, just under the number that would designate him as obese, according to information released Tuesday.

“The president, he and I talked and... I think a reasonable goal over the next year or so is (to lose) 10 or 15 pounds,” Jackson said, adding that a nutritionist would be meeting with White House chefs in the coming weeks and that Trump would be put on an exercise routine.

“He’s more enthusiastic about the diet,” Jackson said.

Jackson not concerned about Trump’s stress levels

Despite concerns from the public and reports that have painted a chaotic White House, Jackson said that he has no concerns about the president’s stress levels.

“I talk to him sometimes about stress just because I think it’s my job as his physician to bring it up on occasion,” he said. “I’ve never seen the president stressed out too much. ... He has a unique ability to push the reset button and he just gets up and he starts a new day. (I think it’s) made him healthier from a stress standpoint.”

Jackson did not test Trump’s hearing

Jackson said he didn’t have enough time to test Trump’s hearing, although he planned to conduct such a test in future physicals.

Related

Kim Kardashian, Kanye West welcome third child via surrogate

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 12:20 PM

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West Welcome Third Child, ‘Healthy, Beautiful Baby Girl’

Kim Kardashian West and Kanye West are parents of three. The TV personality and rapper welcomed a baby girl Monday via surrogate. The couple, married in 2014, are already parents to daughter North, 4, and son Saint, 2.

>> Read more trending news 

Kardashian West confirmed the news on her official website.

“Kanye and I are happy to announce the arrival of our healthy, beautiful baby girl. We are incredibly grateful to our surrogate who made our dreams come true with the greatest gift one could give and to our wonderful doctors and nurses for their special care. North and Saint are especially thrilled to welcome their baby sister.”

The baby was born Jan. 15 at 12:47 a.m. PT and weighed 7 pounds, 6 ounces, Kardashian West said.

Related: Kim Kardashian and Kanye West: A relationship timeline

Reports emerged in July that the celebrity pair hired a surrogate to carry their third child. By September, Kardashian West confirmed the news and later revealed to Ellen DeGeneres that they were having a baby girl.

Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West welcomed their third child via surrogate Jan. 15.(Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Harper's Bazaar)
The newest addition joins an ever-growing Kardashian-Jenner family. Kardashian’s sister, Khloe Kardashian, confirmed she is six months pregnant with her first child with boyfriend Tristan Thompson of the Cleveland Cavaliers. Reports say Kardashian West’s youngest half sister, Kylie Jenner, is also pregnant with her first child with her boyfriend, rapper Travis Scott.

Driver uninjured after I-70 rollover crash 

Published: Monday, January 15, 2018 @ 9:39 AM
Updated: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 7:51 AM

VIDEO: Rollover crash on I-70 West

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • I-70 West a rollover crash was reported at 3:15 p.m. The driver was uninjured.
  • On Needmore Road at northbound I-75 in Dayton, two-vehicle crash reported around 7:30 a.m. Left lanes are blocked. 
  • Shroyer Road at SR 65 in Shelby County, single-vehicle rollover crash reported around 5:50 a.m. No word on injuries, Careflight has been put on standby. 

Surface Street Incidents

  • No incidents have been reported. 

>> RELATED: WHIO App-Winter

>> RELATED: Check for delays or cancellations before heading to the airport

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west and east, Lane width restriction until Apr. 1, 2018. One lane will remain open on the ramp with a width of 11 feet.

NEW DETAILS: Rockin’ hootenanny planned for legendary Dayton bar owner 

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 5:05 PM

Michael
Michael "Mick" Montgomery at a 2003 Wood Guthrie show at Canal Street Tavern. Montgomery died on Jan. 13, 2018.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Sharon Lane was crying and bleeding the first time she met Michael “Mick” Montgomery. 

They were on the playground at Fairport Elementary School and Lane, then 5 years old, had just fallen off the jungle gym and busted up her knee. 

“And then he came over and took my hand and said ‘you need to go see your teacher’,” Lane recalled of the then-third grader. “I just thought he was special. That was a simple gesture. I thought he was a ‘good big boy’.” 

Lane said her regard for Mick deepened after she began managing Canal Street Tavern, the legendary Dayton bar and music venue he opened in late 1981 at 

308 E. First St., in Dayton’s downtown. 

>> RELATED: Mick Montgomery, staple of Dayton music scene, dies 

“If he loved you, he would do anything for you,” she said of Mick. 

Mick died Saturday morning of natural causes at Kettering Medical Center. 

Funeral services for the 71-year-old are set for 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 20, at Tobias Funeral Home, 3970 Dayton Xenia Road, Beavercreek. 

Canal Street Tavern-style hootenanny will be held that day starting at 6 p.m. at 

The Brightside Music and Event Venue, 905 E. Third St., Dayton. 

>> RELATED: What you should know about Brightside 

Canal Street shut down after one final show Nov. 30, 2013. 

Canal Public House took over the former Canal Street space when the club closed. That business lost its licence in March 2016. 

Mick Montgomery surrounding by former employees at the closing of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

>> RELATED: Downtown Dayton music venue loses liquor license 

5th Street Wine & Deli rebranded itself and opened in the space as Canal Street Arcade and Deli in June 2017. 

Musicians and music fans are invited to attend the free celebration. 

Friends and family members say Mick brought hundreds of national acts to Dayton and provided a showcase for local talent. 

Lane said there were few things Mick loved more than music and that was expressed by the work he did to present in his beloved and intimate listening room. 

The club was simple, she said, noting it had a wooden floors that probably should have been replaced. 

>> MORE: Street named for local music icon to be dedicated

Canal Street’s bathrooms were notorious for being anything but modern.

A sign at Canal Street Tavern taken at the bar's closing party.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

The crowd wasn’t fancy and neither were the drinks. 

“It was a good drink in a clean glass,” Lane said.  

Those things didn’t matter in the grand scheme of things. 

“He always put music first. He put it before making money. He certainty put it before alcohol,” Lane said. “He wanted music to be the focus of that club and it was.” 

Lane, a noted Dayton musician, started hosting Canal Street’s musician’s co-op that first year it was open and was its manager the 10 or so years that followed. 

Before his passing, Mick was set to revive the co-op the first Friday of each month at Hannah’s, 121 N. Ludlow St. in downtown Dayton, starting at 9 p.m. Feb. 2, 2018. 

Lane will now step in for the friend she considered a big brother. 

“Mick has fought a long hard battle being sick,” Lane said. “I said, ‘go on brother, you’ve been a strong man.’” 

WYSO host Tod Weidner, a local musician and former co-op host, said Mick changed his life. 

Wiedner was among the local musicians who shared stories about Canal Street at 

Canal Street Stories: A Celebration and Reunion on Saturday, Jan. 6 at Yellow Cab Tavern. 

Mick, a Yellow Cab fan,  was there for the event and over the moon. 

>> RELATED: Spirit of iconic Dayton club rising from the ashes with these 2 events

“It was really nice that we were able to give him a night,” Weidner said. “ I am glad he got to bask in the adulation.” 

Weidner said he was naive the first time he walked into Canal Street as a 21-year-old contestant in the Dayton Band Playoffs, then an annual battle between local bands. 

Weidner’s band, the Rehab Doll, was creamed 130 to 30 by the far more popular band Walaroo South. 

Tod Weidner, Jamy Holliday, Mick Montgomery and Sharon Lane on stage at Canal Street Stories: A Celebration and Reunion from 7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. on Saturday Jan. 6, 2017.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Despite the loss, the Ludlow Falls native was hooked on Canal Street. 

“I fell in love with the place immediately. It was a very welcoming room,” he said. “It wasn’t much to look at. It was a weird little room and it was dark, but it had a mojo to it. A room takes on the magic of the people that played there.” 

The club hosted everything from folk, blues and country rock to bluegrass, indie rock and punk. Canal Street also drew well-known acts, such as Mary Chapin Carpenter, Los Lobos, The Del McCoury Band, Leo Kottke and Bela Fleck & the Flecktones. 

Before the band Phish became popular, it played Canal Street to a crowd of just 17 people. 

“The more I traveled playing music, the more I knew I took it (Canal Street) for granted,” Weidner said. 

Mick, Weidner said, was an evangelist of good music and strived to “hip” others to new artists and sounds. 

“I literally owe him everything,” he said. “I was a complete musical tadpole before I played Canal Street.” 

Before Canal Street, Weidner likened his music knowledge to looking through binoculars backwards. 

Afterward he said it was like seeing in cinerama. 

“Any eclectic knowledge I really have about music I have to credit to Mick and Canal Street,” Weidner said. “It was really great exposure to things I would never have seen. It was such a education every time I walked in there.” 

Chris Montgomery, the eldest of Mick’s three children, said he knows it is cliche, but he is blown away by the expression of love for his father. 

Chris said he was about 13 when his dad, at the time an art teacher at West Carrollton High School, bought the spaces that would be Canal Street from the red-haired owner of Evelyn’s Corner Cafe. 

Mick Montgomery and his son Eli outside of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Chris said his father, a guitarist, filled his world with music. 

“He wasn’t a business man,” Chris said. “He was more about the musicians than growing an empire or making a huge amount of money.” 

The Oregon District home Mick rehabed is filled with CDs, albums and cassette tapes. 

“He usually listened to it all,” Chris said. “He would want to tell everybody about it, in his own words, “ ‘turn them on to it’.” 

>> Dayton icon Jerry Gillotti, Gilly’s nightclub owner, dies

Chris, now a deafblind education specialist at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Austin, Texas, said his dad passed down a love of music. 

“I grew up playing music at Canal Street,” he said. “I can’t imagine a world without music. It is very much a part of my being.” 

Mick was extremely proud of his children and even as he grew ill, took steps to make sure they spent time together, his son said. 

Mick’s daughter, Hannah Montgomery, is studying law in Washington, D.C. His son, Eli Montgomery, lives in Dayton. 

The Dayton native’s list of survivors also include siblings Dennis Montgomery of Minnesota; Kathy Holt of Alaska and Patti Montgomery of Florida. 

“We loved him a lot,” Chris said. “He was not a typical dad, but we wouldn’t have wanted any other dad.” 

Mick left Dayton in 1967, a year after Chris was born. 

Mick Montgomery surrounding by former employees at the closing of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

The 21-or-so-year-old ended up on the corner of Haight and Ashbury streets in San Francisco, ground zero of the counterculture. 

Jamy Holliday, a long-time Canal Street manager and member of the seminal Dayton bands Mystery Addicts, Haunting Souls and Luxury Pushers, said Mick’s time in San Francisco and time in the1960s folk scene influenced the listening room he created in Dayton. 

>> RELATED: Mick Montgomery: Never say he was a ‘hippie’ at heart

“He respected musicians,” Holliday said. “He was always very supportive of providing a stage where the accomplished and the not-so accomplished could play the same stage.” 

Mick, Holliday said, was about music being a unifying force. 

Holliday was an eyeliner-wearing 17-year-old with a 14-inch mohawk when he first started working at Canal Street as a doorman for shows ranging from bluegrass to rock. 

Canal Street hosted the Women’s Series in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. The yearly series featured lesbian and other feminist performers. 

Holliday said there were few problems because it was about the music. 

“He really did believe that music was an equaling and leveling instrument,” Holliday said of Mick. He sacrificed himself. He ate, slept and breathed Canal Street Tavern.” 

Former Dayton Daily News photographer Jan Underwood took thousands of photos at Canal Street during its more than three decades of operation. 

Mick wanted Canal Street to be a listening room in the purist sense of the term. 

Underwood said that all changed the night in 1984 that Jim “Rev. Cool” Carter, a longtime WYSO DJ, brought the cow punk band Rank and File to Canal Street’s stage. 

“We started handing table and chairs fire brigade style off the dance floor,” she said. 

She said those who frequented Canal Street were a family. 

“I took my son there when he was young because it was a safe place go,” she said. 

“If someone was drinking too much, they were not able to stay and ruin the night for everyone else.” 

Underwood said music was Mick’s life, and he wanted to share that love. 

“I went in there so many times and he’d say you have to check out this act that is coming next week, she said. “You would not be disappointed.”

 

Friends with Mick Montgomery.(Jessica Hansbauer,Jan Underwood)