Celina mayor describes storm damage as ‘tremendous’

Published: Sunday, November 05, 2017 @ 4:43 PM
Updated: Sunday, November 05, 2017 @ 5:21 PM

Celina raw Video

UPDATE @ 5:21 p.m.

The mayor of Celina says eight people were injured; all believed to be non-life threatening.

Watch as the mayor gives updates to News Center 7’s Sean Cudahy.

>> 8 injured in Celina, roofs blown off business following tornado reports

“I’ve seen a lot of hard hit areas with storms, even as far as having relatives down in the hurricanes,” Mayor Jeffrey Hazel said.  “I can say this is pretty tremendous damage in this area.”

“We will have crews out all night for as long as it takes to get everything back up and running,” Hazel said.

Strong winds in Celina where tornado was reported

EARLIER REPORT

A tornado watch remains in effect until 7 p.m. tonight, Nov. 5. A tornado was reported in Mercer County today. 

News Center 7’s Sean Cudahy is on the way to C-Town Wings on Havemann Road for reports of heavy damages and possibly two people injured. 

Emergency officials near the scene said power lines are down and live. Traffic is significantly backed up in the area of 29 East and Havemann Road.

We’ll update this report.

Is Boston parking space worth $45,000?

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 8:46 PM

A parking space is on the market for $45,000. (Photo: Boston25News.com)
A parking space is on the market for $45,000. (Photo: Boston25News.com)

A piece of real estate about the size of a coffin comes with a drop-dead price in Brookline. 

>> Read more trending news

It’s nearly $45,000 for a parking spot, but snow removal is extra.

Realtor.com shows the spot, off Addington Road, hit the market in November for $15,000 more than it costs now. 

In Brookline, parking is at a premium. But the spot isn’t even premium parking. For one thing, you're at risk of getting sideswiped and there's a tree stump that makes getting out of the passenger seat a little difficult. 

To be fair, the listing does not promise voluminous, capacious or anything of the sort. 

Though it may be in a "sought after location," the property description also advises it is "suitable for compact car only." 

“It seems like a lot of money, but it's not unreasonable for a parking space in Brookline,” The Presti Group’s Gina Dirocco said.

Dirocco says there's a good reason why, in Brookline, this humble pad of asphalt could fetch such a seemingly outrageous price. 

“Most towns around here will let you park overnight nine months out of the year. All the months except the winter. Brookline, however, does not offer parking any time of the year. Ever,” she explained. 

With a low-enough interest rate, it's even possible slot number 12 could wind up costing less per month than a rented space. 

Still, what might make good economic sense in the long run might not feel, to some, like good common sense in the short term. 

It’s been on the market for a while and still hasn’t sold. 

ECOT, Ohio’s largest online charter school, officially closing Friday

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 8:33 PM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 8:39 PM


            The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is an online charter school.
The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is an online charter school.

The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT), Ohio’s largest online K-12 school, is being closed effective immediately by its sponsor, according to Ohio Department of Education officials.

“The Ohio Department of Education was informed this evening that the ESC of Lake Erie West has suspended the operations of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow,” state Superintendent Paolo DeMaria said Thursday night. “We are beginning the implementation of a plan to support students and families in identifying new educational opportunities to meet their needs.”

RELATED: Thousands of families scramble to adjust

ECOT claimed an enrollment of more than 15,000 students just two years ago, including more than 1,000 in the Dayton area. But state officials eventually challenged that figure, suggesting there were closer to 6,000 full-time students at the online charter school.

ECOT argued that it merely had to “present” 920 hours of “learning opportunities” for students, while ODE said students had to be logged on and engaged in school activities. ECOT fought and lost multiple court challenges, and the state began “clawing back” $60 million that it paid the school in 2015-2016 based on the higher enrollment figure.

RELATED: State withholds more money from ECOT

ECOT consistently ranks near the bottom of Ohio on state test scores, earning five F’s and a D on the 2016-17 state report card components.

Dayton Public Schools, which was losing close to 500 students to ECOT according to the charter school’s figures, has already begun trying to connect with those students, according to Acting Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli.

“Districts and schools have already taken actions to streamline and accelerate their enrollment processes (for ECOT students),” DeMaria said. “We know the entire education community will come together with care and compassion in the best interest of these students.”

RELATED: State auditor takes aim at ECOT funding

The Ohio Department of Education posted information on its web site to help families seeking new schools.

Florida deputy, husband arrested after 16 pounds of pot found in house, records say

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 8:31 PM

File photo.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
File photo. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)(Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A Palm Beach County Sheriff’s corrections deputy and her husband were arrested on several drug charges after narcotics agents found more than 16 pounds of packaged marijuana inside of their South Bay home, according to court records.

>> Read more trending news

Marquita Perez is being held on $41,000 bail at the Palm Beach County jail and is charged with possession of marijuana in excess of 20 grams and possession of property used for trafficking drugs. Her husband, Bobby, was arrested July 26 and charged with possession of marijuana with intent to sell as well as possession of property used for trafficking. He was released on $7,500 bond two days later. Marquita Perez was not arrested in July with her husband because the sheriff’s office was waiting for DNA results from the evidence, according to the report.

Marquita Perez has been a corrections deputy with the sheriff’s office since 2014, according to Florida Department of Law Enforcement records. The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office said she is on paid leave at this time.

When narcotics agents came into their South Bay home in July, Bobby Perez said his wife had nothing to do with his drugs. Marquita also denied knowledge of the drugs. She said she was the one “footing all the bills.”

“If he’s selling drugs, where the (expletive) the money at?” she asked agents, according to the report.

Bobby Perez showed agents the marijuana packages throughout the home including in a duffel bag, white suitcase and a black box in the home. Additionally, more marijuana was found in the garage in a backpack and on the washing machine. The deputies noted a “heavy and unmistakable odor of marijuana.”

He told deputies that he “intended to sell the 15 pounds he bought in a quick sale to make money because he has a child on the way.” According to the report, Perez was five months pregnant in July.

When Marquita Perez was asked who does the laundry, she said both she and her husband do. When asked if she ever smelled marijuana in the home or on her husband, she said maybe on her husband, but said he didn’t smoke.

Bobby Perez was arrested on July 26. Deputies note in the report they were waiting for DNA results to see if they would arrest Marquita. In December, deputies got the results back, and her DNA was found on the bags used to package the marijuana as well as other items.

Good Samaritan final decision made night before announcement

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 3:04 PM

Good Samaritan Hospital closing by end of 2018

Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton will close by the end of 2018.

Premier Health announced on Wednesday that the hospital, based on the northwest side of Dayton, will shut down by the end of 2018. The health network — the largest private employer in the region — said the closure is “part of Premier Health’s new strategic plan.”

Here’s what we know about the closure now:

MAKING A DECISION: Mary Garman, chief operating officer at Good Sam, said there were several options that were looked at before the decision was made to close the Dayton hospital. She said company executives have been examining closing options for “many, many” months. The Premier Health Board of Trustees approved the closing Tuesday night before the announcement was made Wednesday morning, shocking many in the community.

RELATED: Sale of Premier Health’s insurance line falls apart

WHY IS THE HOSPITAL SHUTTING DOWN? Premier said it was unsustainable to operate two hospitals within five miles of each other. “The impact of national changes in the health care industry, compounded by the changing face of Dayton over the past decade, made clear that Premier Health had to make significant changes to continue to serve the entire region and reach patients in innovative ways in their communities going forward,” Premier officials said on Wednesday morning.

SEE HOW MUCH HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATORS EARN

JOBS AVAILABLE: Several nurses who spoke to our reporters said Premier Health has told them jobs will be available to them at other facilities and many said they previously worked at multiple locations. Bryan Bucklew, president and CEO of the Greater Dayton Area Hospital Association, said when St. Elizabeth’s Hospital closed that within six months that around 97 percent of the laid off staff were employed again and most were in the Dayton region.

“There’s demand in the sector for health care employees,” Bucklew said.

HEALTH SERVICES TO CONTINUE: There will still be health services at the Good Sam site since the Five Rivers Health Center is staying. The federally qualified health center was built two years ago in the west end of the hospital’s Hepburn parking lot.

The health center has about 30 residents and teaching physicians and is home to services like primary care, management of chronic diseases, behavioral health, women’s health, low risk obstetrical care and is a Centering Pregnancy site, which is a prenatal care and support group program that improves birth outcomes.

» TRENDING COVERAGE: Good Samaritan Hospital closing: What we know now

CATHOLIC ROOTS: The hospitals’ roots stem back to the Sisters of Charity with the Catholic church, which partnered with the city to open the hospital in 1932.

Premier Health and Catholic Health Initiatives first formed a partnership 25 years ago that was an operating and revenue sharing agreement.

The hospital’s affiliation with the Denver-based Catholic health network however was restructured in recent years so that Catholic Health Initiatives still sponsors the Catholic mission of the hospital, but Premier had the sole authority to make the decision to close the hospital.

» MUST-READ HOSPITAL NEWS: Good Samaritan Hospital: Leaders saddened, concerned by closure

WILL OTHER PREMIER HOSPITALS CLOSE? No. Other Premier hospital will not be impacted. “Premier Health’s strategic plan encompasses the entire organization and calls for continued investment in higher acuity services and critical programs at Atrium Medical Center. It also remains committed to ensuring Upper Valley Medical Center remains the leading ambulatory and surgically focused community hospital in its region,” the company explained in a statement.

REMAINING HOSPITALS IN REGION

1. Upper Valley Medical Center - Premier Health

2. Good Samaritan Hospital - Premier Health

3. Grandview Medical Center - Kettering Health

4. Miami Valley Hospital - Premier Halth

5. Soin Medical Center - Kettering Health

6. Kettering Medical Center - Kettering Health

7. Kettering Behavioral Medicine - Kettering Health

8. Miami Valley Hospital South - Premier Health

9. Greene Memorial Hospital - Kettering Health

10. Sycamore Medical Center - Kettering Health

11. Southview Medical Center - Kettering Health

12. Atrium Medical Center - Premier Health

13. Fort Hamilton Hospital - Kettering Health

» MUST-READ BUSINESS NEWS: 5 things you need to know about Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton

HOW WILL HOSPITAL DECIDE FUTURE: Community input will be sought for what comes next for the Good Samaritan Hospital after the 85-year-old institution is torn down, but there is no timetable, Premier officials said. The changes at Good Samaritan won’t all come at once, but by the end of the year 1,600 employees will shifted off site and the Dayton hospital’s main campus will have ceased operations. Premier Health said it just launched a three-year strategic plan that calls for closing down the hospital.

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