CLOSINGS AND DELAYS:

Central Christian Church-Kettering, Dayton Christian School, Greater Love Christian Church, Greater St. John M.B. Church, Huber Heights Schools, Moraine Seniors Citizens Club, Piqua Baptist Church, Residence in Praise Fine Arts Center, S.H.I. Integrative Med. Massage Sc., St. Patrick's Catholic Church, Tipp Monroe Community Services, Xenia Grace Chapel,

School leaders, lawmaker seek to reduce state mandates

Published: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 @ 9:13 PM

Leaders look to reduce state mandates for schools

School leaders in the area are pushing for more flexibility to reduce costly and cumbersome state mandates.

They cover everything from testing to truancy.

The drive to make changes is starting now with the help of a state lawmaker.

“What we’re trying to do is returning the management of the schools to the local level,” said State Sen. Matt Huffman, R-Lima, whose district includes Champaign, Mercer and Shelby counties and parts of Auglaize, Darke and Logan counties.

>>Wittenberg University students hold vigil for victims of Las Vegas massacre

Backers of the plan’s best argument if that too many state mandates work against the best interest of the students.

“The bill allows the local board of education the opportunity to define areas of impact within the annual requirements, also allows flexibility in testing, Coldwater Schools Superintendent Jason Woods said.

GOT A TIP? Contact the 24-hour monitored line at 937-259-2329 or newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Driver uninjured after I-70 rollover crash 

Published: Monday, January 15, 2018 @ 9:39 AM
Updated: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 7:51 AM

VIDEO: Rollover crash on I-70 West

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

Major Highway Incidents

  • I-70 West a rollover crash was reported at 3:15 p.m. The driver was uninjured.
  • On Needmore Road at northbound I-75 in Dayton, two-vehicle crash reported around 7:30 a.m. Left lanes are blocked. 
  • Shroyer Road at SR 65 in Shelby County, single-vehicle rollover crash reported around 5:50 a.m. No word on injuries, Careflight has been put on standby. 

Surface Street Incidents

  • No incidents have been reported. 

>> RELATED: WHIO App-Winter

>> RELATED: Check for delays or cancellations before heading to the airport

>> RELATED: Track the latest conditions in your neighborhood on our live WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

  • Keowee Street north of Stanley Avenue, bridge closed until 2019. The official detour is: Keowee Street to Stanley Avenue to I-75 to Wagner Ford Road and back to Dixie. More information is available here.
  • Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, RAMP CLOSURE March 28 - Sept 30, 2018. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H. McGee Blvd. to US 35 east.
  • I-75 north Ramp to US 35 west and east, Lane width restriction until Apr. 1, 2018. One lane will remain open on the ramp with a width of 11 feet.

NEW DETAILS: Rockin’ hootenanny planned for legendary Dayton bar owner 

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 5:05 PM

Michael
Michael "Mick" Montgomery at a 2003 Wood Guthrie show at Canal Street Tavern. Montgomery died on Jan. 13, 2018.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Sharon Lane was crying and bleeding the first time she met Michael “Mick” Montgomery. 

They were on the playground at Fairport Elementary School and Lane, then 5 years old, had just fallen off the jungle gym and busted up her knee. 

“And then he came over and took my hand and said ‘you need to go see your teacher’,” Lane recalled of the then-third grader. “I just thought he was special. That was a simple gesture. I thought he was a ‘good big boy’.” 

Lane said her regard for Mick deepened after she began managing Canal Street Tavern, the legendary Dayton bar and music venue he opened in late 1981 at 

308 E. First St., in Dayton’s downtown. 

>> RELATED: Mick Montgomery, staple of Dayton music scene, dies 

“If he loved you, he would do anything for you,” she said of Mick. 

Mick died Saturday morning of natural causes at Kettering Medical Center. 

Funeral services for the 71-year-old are set for 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 20, at Tobias Funeral Home, 3970 Dayton Xenia Road, Beavercreek. 

Canal Street Tavern-style hootenanny will be held that day starting at 6 p.m. at 

The Brightside Music and Event Venue, 905 E. Third St., Dayton. 

>> RELATED: What you should know about Brightside 

Canal Street shut down after one final show Nov. 30, 2013. 

Canal Public House took over the former Canal Street space when the club closed. That business lost its licence in March 2016. 

Mick Montgomery surrounding by former employees at the closing of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

>> RELATED: Downtown Dayton music venue loses liquor license 

5th Street Wine & Deli rebranded itself and opened in the space as Canal Street Arcade and Deli in June 2017. 

Musicians and music fans are invited to attend the free celebration. 

Friends and family members say Mick brought hundreds of national acts to Dayton and provided a showcase for local talent. 

Lane said there were few things Mick loved more than music and that was expressed by the work he did to present in his beloved and intimate listening room. 

The club was simple, she said, noting it had a wooden floors that probably should have been replaced. 

>> MORE: Street named for local music icon to be dedicated

Canal Street’s bathrooms were notorious for being anything but modern.

A sign at Canal Street Tavern taken at the bar's closing party.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

The crowd wasn’t fancy and neither were the drinks. 

“It was a good drink in a clean glass,” Lane said.  

Those things didn’t matter in the grand scheme of things. 

“He always put music first. He put it before making money. He certainty put it before alcohol,” Lane said. “He wanted music to be the focus of that club and it was.” 

Lane, a noted Dayton musician, started hosting Canal Street’s musician’s co-op that first year it was open and was its manager the 10 or so years that followed. 

Before his passing, Mick was set to revive the co-op the first Friday of each month at Hannah’s, 121 N. Ludlow St. in downtown Dayton, starting at 9 p.m. Feb. 2, 2018. 

Lane will now step in for the friend she considered a big brother. 

“Mick has fought a long hard battle being sick,” Lane said. “I said, ‘go on brother, you’ve been a strong man.’” 

WYSO host Tod Weidner, a local musician and former co-op host, said Mick changed his life. 

Wiedner was among the local musicians who shared stories about Canal Street at 

Canal Street Stories: A Celebration and Reunion on Saturday, Jan. 6 at Yellow Cab Tavern. 

Mick, a Yellow Cab fan,  was there for the event and over the moon. 

>> RELATED: Spirit of iconic Dayton club rising from the ashes with these 2 events

“It was really nice that we were able to give him a night,” Weidner said. “ I am glad he got to bask in the adulation.” 

Weidner said he was naive the first time he walked into Canal Street as a 21-year-old contestant in the Dayton Band Playoffs, then an annual battle between local bands. 

Weidner’s band, the Rehab Doll, was creamed 130 to 30 by the far more popular band Walaroo South. 

Tod Weidner, Jamy Holliday, Mick Montgomery and Sharon Lane on stage at Canal Street Stories: A Celebration and Reunion from 7 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. on Saturday Jan. 6, 2017.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Despite the loss, the Ludlow Falls native was hooked on Canal Street. 

“I fell in love with the place immediately. It was a very welcoming room,” he said. “It wasn’t much to look at. It was a weird little room and it was dark, but it had a mojo to it. A room takes on the magic of the people that played there.” 

The club hosted everything from folk, blues and country rock to bluegrass, indie rock and punk. Canal Street also drew well-known acts, such as Mary Chapin Carpenter, Los Lobos, The Del McCoury Band, Leo Kottke and Bela Fleck & the Flecktones. 

Before the band Phish became popular, it played Canal Street to a crowd of just 17 people. 

“The more I traveled playing music, the more I knew I took it (Canal Street) for granted,” Weidner said. 

Mick, Weidner said, was an evangelist of good music and strived to “hip” others to new artists and sounds. 

“I literally owe him everything,” he said. “I was a complete musical tadpole before I played Canal Street.” 

Before Canal Street, Weidner likened his music knowledge to looking through binoculars backwards. 

Afterward he said it was like seeing in cinerama. 

“Any eclectic knowledge I really have about music I have to credit to Mick and Canal Street,” Weidner said. “It was really great exposure to things I would never have seen. It was such a education every time I walked in there.” 

Chris Montgomery, the eldest of Mick’s three children, said he knows it is cliche, but he is blown away by the expression of love for his father. 

Chris said he was about 13 when his dad, at the time an art teacher at West Carrollton High School, bought the spaces that would be Canal Street from the red-haired owner of Evelyn’s Corner Cafe. 

Mick Montgomery and his son Eli outside of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

Chris said his father, a guitarist, filled his world with music. 

“He wasn’t a business man,” Chris said. “He was more about the musicians than growing an empire or making a huge amount of money.” 

The Oregon District home Mick rehabed is filled with CDs, albums and cassette tapes. 

“He usually listened to it all,” Chris said. “He would want to tell everybody about it, in his own words, “ ‘turn them on to it’.” 

>> Dayton icon Jerry Gillotti, Gilly’s nightclub owner, dies

Chris, now a deafblind education specialist at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Austin, Texas, said his dad passed down a love of music. 

“I grew up playing music at Canal Street,” he said. “I can’t imagine a world without music. It is very much a part of my being.” 

Mick was extremely proud of his children and even as he grew ill, took steps to make sure they spent time together, his son said. 

Mick’s daughter, Hannah Montgomery, is studying law in Washington, D.C. His son, Eli Montgomery, lives in Dayton. 

The Dayton native’s list of survivors also include siblings Dennis Montgomery of Minnesota; Kathy Holt of Alaska and Patti Montgomery of Florida. 

“We loved him a lot,” Chris said. “He was not a typical dad, but we wouldn’t have wanted any other dad.” 

Mick left Dayton in 1967, a year after Chris was born. 

Mick Montgomery surrounding by former employees at the closing of Canal Street in 2013.(Photo courtesy of Jan Underwood)

The 21-or-so-year-old ended up on the corner of Haight and Ashbury streets in San Francisco, ground zero of the counterculture. 

Jamy Holliday, a long-time Canal Street manager and member of the seminal Dayton bands Mystery Addicts, Haunting Souls and Luxury Pushers, said Mick’s time in San Francisco and time in the1960s folk scene influenced the listening room he created in Dayton. 

>> RELATED: Mick Montgomery: Never say he was a ‘hippie’ at heart

“He respected musicians,” Holliday said. “He was always very supportive of providing a stage where the accomplished and the not-so accomplished could play the same stage.” 

Mick, Holliday said, was about music being a unifying force. 

Holliday was an eyeliner-wearing 17-year-old with a 14-inch mohawk when he first started working at Canal Street as a doorman for shows ranging from bluegrass to rock. 

Canal Street hosted the Women’s Series in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. The yearly series featured lesbian and other feminist performers. 

Holliday said there were few problems because it was about the music. 

“He really did believe that music was an equaling and leveling instrument,” Holliday said of Mick. He sacrificed himself. He ate, slept and breathed Canal Street Tavern.” 

Former Dayton Daily News photographer Jan Underwood took thousands of photos at Canal Street during its more than three decades of operation. 

Mick wanted Canal Street to be a listening room in the purist sense of the term. 

Underwood said that all changed the night in 1984 that Jim “Rev. Cool” Carter, a longtime WYSO DJ, brought the cow punk band Rank and File to Canal Street’s stage. 

“We started handing table and chairs fire brigade style off the dance floor,” she said. 

She said those who frequented Canal Street were a family. 

“I took my son there when he was young because it was a safe place go,” she said. 

“If someone was drinking too much, they were not able to stay and ruin the night for everyone else.” 

Underwood said music was Mick’s life, and he wanted to share that love. 

“I went in there so many times and he’d say you have to check out this act that is coming next week, she said. “You would not be disappointed.”

 

Friends with Mick Montgomery.(Jessica Hansbauer,Jan Underwood)

Bitter cold temperatures to continue

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 3:38 AM
Updated: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 5:27 AM

A cold day with a few flurries possible this evening.

RELATED: Winter in full swing: another cold blast sends temps to well below freezing

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

       
       
    • Wind chills to stay well below zero tonight
    • Slow warming trend begins midweek
    • Chance for rain this weekend

RELATED: Closings and Delays

DETAILED FORECAST

THIS EVENING:  Lots of clouds with occasional flurries. Little or snow accumulation is expected but a coating can’t be ruled out after sunset. Temperature will be frigid, holding in the single digits. Wind chills will be between 5 to 10 below zero. 

TONIGHT: Some flurries will be around, mainly early. Clouds will break late. Temperatures will drop to between 0 and 5 degrees with well below zero wind chill readings.

RELATED: WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

WEDNESDAY: Another cold day is in the forecast although more sunshine is expected. Highs will reach to near 20 degrees.

RELATED: 5-Day Forecast

THURSDAY: Expect sunny skies with a slow warming trend continuing. However, the slightly warmer temperatures will be tempered by the breezy conditions. Highs will be in the upper 20s.

FRIDAY: Expect mostly sunny skies with some increase in clouds late. Highs will rebound into the middle 30s.

SATURDAY:  Clouds will be on the increase with a chance for a few showers or drizzle late in the day. Highs will be in the middle 40s. 

SUNDAY: It will be breezy and relatively mild with highs topping out near 50 degrees. However, there will be the chance for showers.

Waynesville moves toward 2nd street levy try

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 4:07 PM


            Known for the Ohio Sauerkraut Festival, Waynesville meets tonight to discuss putting a street levy on the on the May ballot, although voters rejected one in November.
Known for the Ohio Sauerkraut Festival, Waynesville meets tonight to discuss putting a street levy on the on the May ballot, although voters rejected one in November.

The village council is meeting tonight to discuss - and possibly take a big step toward - asking voters for the second time to approve a street levy.

In November, voters rejected, 427-361, a proposed 3-mill street levy on a ballot also featuring a local school bond issue and police levy.

On the same ballots, voters approved, 427-361, a 7-mill police levy, as well as a 4.68 mill, 37-year bond issue by only seven votes, 1,241-1,234.

MORE: Waynesville school issue passed by 7 votes

“That was 15 mills on the ballot,” Mayor Dave Stubbs said.

In May, the street levy could be alone on local ballots.

Tonight, the Waynesville council is to meet to consider asking the Warren County Auditor’s Office to calculate the projected proceeds from renewing an existing, but about to expire, 1 mill levy; and from a 3-mill levy.

MORE:Waynesville, Warren County water dispute

By Feb. 7, the council would need to pass a second resolution designating the millage to go on the May 8 ballot.

One mill is “barely enough to fill a pothole” and 3 mills is only enough to pay for repaving of every village street once every 50 years, Stubbs said.

“We really need 5 mills,” Stubbs said, so that the village can continue to build up reserves, including more than $1 million in the general fund, for unanticipated emergencies.