Ohio 571 reopening today following grain silo collapse, officials say

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 11:44 PM
Updated: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 @ 3:36 PM

SKY7: Aerial footage of the continued clean up efforts after grain silo explodes in New Carlisle more than a week after the silo collapsed, spilling tens of thousands of tons of grain all over.

UPDATE @ 3:55 p.m. (Feb. 5):

New Carlisle fire officials said they expect Ohio 571 to reopen by 6 p.m. following the grain silo collapse last month.

UPDATE @ 2:34 p.m. (Jan. 30):The Clark County transportation administrator has extended the closure of Ohio 571, so crews have more time to clean up the scene, according to the Ohio Department of Transportation.

The reopening has been pushed back to Feb. 5, however the road could reopen sooner depending on clean up, ODOT said.

UPDATE @ 10:38 a.m. (Jan. 30):

Ohio 571 near the site of a grain silo collapse is scheduled to reopen Wednesday, according to the Ohio Department of Transportation.

Sky 7 flew over the scene Tuesday morning, showing the majority of the state route being cleared of corn.

LOCAL NEWS: Girl, 16, to be charged in ‘sexting’ case involving Vandalia Butler students

UPDATE @ 1:32 p.m. (Jan. 25):

The Ohio Department of Transportation said the continued closure of Ohio 571 near Scarff Road is for the safety of drivers as cleanup continues, a decision echoed by multiple agencies.

“Even though State Route 571 is basically clear right now, they still have a lot of piles of corn really close to the roadway,” said ODOT spokeswoman Mandi Dillon.

Dillon said ODOT is a supporting agency in the case and they are working closely with the city of New Carlisle.

ODOT said with the continued cleanup efforts and due to the amount of heavy machinery that has been entering and exiting the road, the decision was the best to make for public safety.

SKY7: Aerial footage of the clean up of exploded grain silo in New Carlisle

UPDATE @ 4 p.m. (Jan. 24)

According to the Ohio Department of Transportation, State Route 571 will be closed near Scarff Road until January 31. The official detour will remain as SR 201 to US40 to SR 235. 

UPDATE @ 8:57 a.m. (Jan. 24):

New Carlisle Fire Chief Steve Trusty said corn continues to cover and close Ohio 571 Wednesday after a silo collapse Sunday night.

Trusty said clean up crews are making headway with their efforts, but a lot of debris still needs moved.

The Ohio Department of Transportation will be checking the road to make sure it is safe after the corn is removed, Trusty said.

Additional work needing done because of damage includes moving electrical line and replacing four utility poles, he said.

INITIAL REPORT:

Ohio 571 remains closed in New Carlisle after a grain silo collapse sent 10,000 tons of corn onto the roadway late Sunday evening.

Crews worked delicately Tuesday to prevent any damage to other nearby buildings surrounded by corn, said New Carlisle Fire Chief Steven Trusty.

"Give us the time, because it's not going to go away in a day,” Trusty said. "It's going to be a very slow process."

LOCAL NEWS: Centerville officers honored for ‘brave’ actions during apartment fire

Sheriff’s deputies are treating the scene at Miami Valley Feed and Grain Company as a crime scene until criminal activity is ruled out.

“(We’re) considering it to be a crime scene until proven otherwise,” said Maj. Christopher Clark with the Clark County Sheriff’s Office.  “We really don’t know what happened to cause the collapse, so we are going to be here to secure the scene.”

Clark said the scene is “very dangerous” and the county is planning to station deputies on the scene around the clock. Anyone that goes past barricades could be subject to charges.

Crews run into issues cleaning up corn after grain silo collapse

Trusty said the corn is being moved onto the property of the grain silo owner for insurance purposes, however once insurance issues are addressed it will be the property owner’s responsibility for removal.

RELATED: Damages still being assessed at AK Steel fire in Middletown

Ohio 571 is expected to be shut down until through at least today, according to the Ohio Department of Transportation.  

ODOT suggested detour is Ohio 201 to U.S. 40, then to Ohio 235, according to a media release. 

ODOT said the road closure times could change depending on the progress of the cleanup. 

Jarod Thrush/Staff

Crews were initially called to Miami Valley Feed & Grain at 880 W. Jefferson St. around 11:40 p.m. on reports of an explosion.

After a preliminary investigation, it was determined that one silo collapsed, rather than exploded, and partially damaged another building as well as caused 10,000 tons of corn to cover Ohio 571.

“What residents heard when they thought they heard explosions were the transformers blowing when the debris hit them”, said Steve Trusty, Chief of New Carlisle Fire Department. 

There were not any employees on site at the time.

The silo collapse took out at least three power poles and power lines, which caused a brief power outage that has since been restored to all area residents.

RELATED: Two coal trail cars carrying  200,000 pounds of raw steel derails in Clark County

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Trending - Most Read Stories

Check for recall announcements for golf carts, pots, candles & more

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 8:02 PM

Rachel's Recall Roundup: Feb. 23, 2017

A kettle, fire pit, bleeding candles and golf carts are among the new recalls announced by the Consumer Product Safety Commission:

Electric Kettles

The handles on some Whirlpool KitchenAid electric kettles could come loose and cause the liquid inside to burn you. 

There are three reports of minor burns and a total of 79 reports of the handles separating. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Student named people he wanted to kill, police say

The recalled kettles come in six colors. Visit repair.whirlpool.com for the full list of model and serial numbers under recall. 

Stop using the kettles and contact Whirlpool at 800-874-0608 for a free replacement. 

Outdoor Gas Pit Table

Three people have been burned by Hampton Bay outdoor gas fire pit table patio heaters sold exclusively at Home Depot. 

The base lacks a heat shield and could burn you when you try to turn it off. 

The recalled fire pit has the following model number: G-FTB51057B and UPC 6944937601579. 

Contact Yayi at 855-600-9294 for a free repair kit. 

Bleeding Drip Candles

Bleeding drip taper candles, by Cost Plus World Market ,are under recall because they may catch fire. 

There is one report of the high candle flame igniting the wax, but no injuries. 

Stop using the candles and contact Cost Plus World Market at 877-967-5362 for a full refund. 

Instant Pot Cookers 

Although not an official recall at this time, Instant Pot is warning customers about overheating and melting in certain styles of its cookers. 

Instant pot

Golf Carts

Yamaha golf cars and personal transportation vehicles (PTVs) are under recall because of 285 reports of the brake cables failing. No one has been hurt. 

Several model numbers of gas and electric vehicles sold between 2015 and 2018 are affected. 

Don't ride on the cars and PTVs. Contact Yamaha at 800-962-7926 for a free repair. 

Reclining Chairs

Stargazer recliner chairs, sold exclusively at REI, are being recalled because straps on the chairs can break and cause you to fall. 

No one has been injured, but there is one report of a chair breaking. 

Don't use the chair. Contact NEMO Equipment at 800-997-9301 for a free replacement. 

Trending - Most Read Stories

Retired Centerville police chief focus of investigation

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 4:01 PM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 4:23 PM

Retired Centerville police chief focus of investigation

Centerville police chief Bruce Robertson’s recent retirement came amid an ongoing investigation into allegations of criminal conduct, according to city officials.

“There were allegations of criminal conduct, therefore we’re following up with conducting an internal investigation into those allegations,” City Manager Wayne Davis said in response to questions from the Dayton Daily News/WHIO I-Team.

“At this time there’s no evidence of criminal activity, however our investigation is not complete,” Davis said.

RELATED: Centerville police chief retires after nearly 40 years

Robertson retired Feb. 9 after working for the city nearly 40 years. His two-page letter of resignation cited “a serious medical condition” for the reason he decided to retire.

When asked whether the investigation was connected to Robertson’s decision to retire, Davis said: “Not from what was shared with me.”

Davis said the internal review is being conducted by the law director and started sometime after Jan. 24.

Robertson couldn’t be reached for comment.

The city of Centerville released a statement Friday saying, in part, “the city is not at liberty to discuss the details of the investigation at this time. The city will continue to cooperate with providing information as it becomes available.”

TRENDING: As gun debate re-emerges, 7 findings from our recent reporting on gun laws

The chief’s personnel records do not indicate the reason for the investigation.

Records from the Ohio Peace Officer Training Academy in London, Ohio, show Robertson has been paid $32,294 to teach classes there since 2010, including $5,600 for seven training sessions in 2017. Davis confirmed the city is looking into whether Robertson was reimbursed for the same days he worked as police chief, getting paid twice for the same hours. He would not say whether those allegations are part of the criminal probe, however.

I-TEAM: Back taxes sought on 1,614 properties in Montgomery County

His most recent performance review in 2016 included positive reviews.

“He cares deeply about the men and women of the Centerville Police Department and strives to maintain the high professional reputation of the organization,” the review says.

But he was also given a formal, verbal warning in December and told to attend a course on harassment in the workplace because of an incident last August, according to the records. While talking with officers about preparations for a rally supporting transgender issues, Robertson jokingly asked a police officer “How’d your surgery go?” The officer complained and the comment was determined to be inappropriate by the city, the records show.

Robertson retired and was rehired in 2014. His employment contract in June 2017 was extended to January 2019.

Robertson was paid $127,501 in 2016, according to the I-Team Payroll Project.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Teen accused in Springfield school threat makes court appearance

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 2:33 PM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 5:22 PM

A Springfield High School student was in Clark County Juvenile Court because of alleged threats posted on social media

The Springfield High School student charged in connection with a school threat that caused local schools and schools across the country to take safety precautions made her first court appearance Friday.

The 17-year-old junior stood before Clark County Juvenile Court Judge Robert Vaughn and cried as the judge told her she was being charged with inducing panic, a felony in the second degree.

READ: Springfield-Clark CTC investigates social media threat

“(The threat) was tracked to the phone of the suspect,” Vaughn said, reading her charging document.

The potential penalty, if she is convicted, is between one year to until she is 21 years old in the Ohio Department of Youth Services, Vaughn said.

The student’s next court date will be Wednesday.

“The court finds given the seriousness of the offense that the defendant be held at this time,” Vaughn said.

The defendant will make her way through the juvenile court system and not be moved to adult court, Clark County Prosecutor Andy Wilson said.

The juvenile court system can handle incidents like these, he said.

MORE: Springfield student arrested in Facebook threat: 4 things to know

“This case will remain in juvenile court for adjudication and the State of Ohio will not seek to have this defendant bound over to adult court,” Wilson said.

What the suspect allegedly did was serious, Wilson said, and it will be prosecuted.

“The actions of this defendant caused serious public inconvenience and alarm,” Wilson said. “This defendant and any other person who posts or issues these kinds of threats will have to answer for their actions in front of a judge.”

He said no one should make threats against a school.

RELATED: Attendance ‘light’ at schools across Clark County after threat

“Local law enforcement will continue to take these threats seriously and anyone caught making these types of threats will be arrested and charged,” he said.

Clark County had a strenuous week with school threats and security. On Tuesday, an unloaded gun was found in an 8-year-old Simon Kenton student’s backpack. And there had been rumors that a gun was found at Springfield High School on Wednesday. Superintendent Bob Hill said the rumors, which concerned many parents and community members on social media, was not true.

Also on Friday, Clark County deputies investigated a supposed threat towards Northwestern Local Schools.

The Northwestern student was arrested at the start of school Friday morning, according to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office and a one-call sent to parents by the district.

“There was another threat and another arrest was made,” Clark County Chief Deputy Travis Russell told the Springfield News-Sun.

Northwestern School Superintendent Jesse Steiner said a student made an online post that was perceived by some to have threatened the school, but that student did not mean to.

READ: Springfield student arrested in Facebook threat: 4 things to know

Steiner said the online post was taken out of context, and the student did not intend to harm anyone.

“At no point was anybody in danger,” Steiner said. “People could have misinterpreted the post. The kid did not threaten anyone.”

The post is a reason why it might be a good idea to talk to kids about what they post online, Steiner said.

“This is a great time to talk about what they post online and how they say it,” he said. “Have that conversation so they can keep their kids safe.”

The status of the student’s case was unknown Friday afternoon.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Teachers with guns? Some Ohio districts arm staff but don’t tell public

Published: Thursday, February 22, 2018 @ 11:41 AM

FILE
FILE

Several school districts in Ohio have armed staff and teachers in an effort to prevent school shootings, but some of those districts have not told parents, students and taxpayers about the firearms in their buildings, the Dayton Daily News recently reported.

On Wednesday, President Trump said that if one of the victims, a football coach, in last week’s Florida school shooting had been armed “he would have shot and that would have been the end of it.”

MORE: 4 arrested as threats rock southwest Ohio schools

GUNS IN SCHOOL: ‘We have to be ready in seconds and not minutes’

WALKOUTS: Can students get in trouble for #NeverAgain walkouts?

The move to arm teachers is growing in Ohio, even if the public has no idea.

In an August 2017 story about arming teachers, some superintendents told the newspaper they are aware of districts that have armed staff and teachers without making the move public.

“It’s way more prevalent than people realize,” said Mad River Schools Superintendent Chad Wyen as part of the 2017 Daily News story. His district trained and armed employees last year. “Sixty-three out of 88 counties in Ohio have a district with a response team.”

MORE: What are school resource officers?

While some intimate details — types and locations of weapons and names of trained staff — are undisclosed as part of Mad River’s safety plan, the mere fact that students and parents know guns are in the building is more information than other Ohio districts provide publicly.

“We decided to be transparent,” said Chris Burrow, superintendent of Georgetown Exempted Village Schools in Brown County, east of Cincinnati, in a 2017 interview. “We went to training this summer, and there were districts that did not tell their communities.”

The superintendents did not specify which schools they knew implemented gun training but did not tell the public.

Burrow’s staff follows a path already blazed by Edgewood City Schools in Butler County, which adopted a concealed carry policy in 2013.

TRENDING: Hundreds of local students walk out after Florida shooting, more walkouts planned

Superintendents who have armed their teachers and staff have largely expressed positive results.

“We had others that just had a lot of questions, especially people who are hesitant around guns,” Burrow said. “I did have a few staff members who said, ‘I don’t know if I can work here.’”

“We worked through it,” he said. “They weren’t as adamantly opposed as they were before.”

Four years after bringing guns into Sidney City Schools, Superintendent John Scheu said more than 90 percent of the staff who first volunteered have stayed with the program. He said the district has no issue finding educators willing to bear arms.

“As a matter of fact, we have a waiting list,” Scheu said.

A poll released this week by ABC News/Washington Post says 42 percent of Americans believe teachers with guns could have prevented the Florida shooting.

The Associated Press contributed reporting.

Trending - Most Read Stories