Major storm to bring heavy rain, strong winds this weekend

Published: Thursday, November 16, 2017 @ 4:02 AM
Updated: Thursday, November 16, 2017 @ 3:32 PM

Quiet for now, but heavy rain and gusty winds develop into the weekend.

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • A chilly night ahead
  • Mix of sun and clouds, increasing winds Friday 
  • Rain, few storms late Friday night into Saturday with strong winds

RELATED: 5-Day Forecast


DETAILED FORECAST

Overnight: A few breaks in the clouds are possible. Otherwise, expect a chilly night with lows in the upper 20s.

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Major Storm Heads East(Graphic by Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell)

Friday: Look for a mix of sun and clouds. It will be warmer with highs rebounding into the lower 50s. Gusty winds will develop late in the day.

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Friday Afternoon(Graphic by Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell)

Saturday: Rain will be likely. Locally heavy rain is possible along with strong wind gusts. Wind gusts could exceed 40mph at times. Temperatures will reach into the upper 50s early in the day but fall into the 30s by late evening. Rain may mix or change to a few snow flurries or snow showers late Saturday evening or night.

Saturday Wind Gust Potential(Graphic by Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell)

Sunday: Expect lots of clouds with the chance for a few flurries or a passing snow shower, mainly north. It will remain blustery. Highs will be in the upper 30s.

Monday: Mostly sunny skies are expected with cool conditions. Highs will be in the lower 40s.

Tuesday: Expect some increase in clouds and breezy conditions with highs in the upper 40s.

Man taken to jail after he breaks into his own, nuisance abated home

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:56 PM

A 67-year-old man remains in jail on charges accusing him of breaking into his own home - a home police and neighbors said has been placed on a nusiance abatement list.

Harry Clinton Wright was arrested just after 6:30 p.m. when Dayton police were able to get him to come out of his house in the 2900 block of Kingston Avenue. 

Harry Clinton Wright (Courtesy/Montgomery County Jail)

Police had been dispatched there just after 6 p.m. after neighbors called 9-1-1 to report that Wright had removed wood used to board up the structure to get inside. 

Wright was booked into the Montgomery County Jail on a felony charge of breaking and entering, and misdemeanor charges of illegal occupation and obstructing official business. 

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His bail is $2,750 or 10 percent of that and he's due in court Wednesday. 

Police at the scene told us that Tuesday night was not the first time Wright has broken into his own home. He has been arrested before. 

Dayton's Use Nuisance Abatement Program is a legal process by which a structure can be declared a nuisance by virtue of evidence of certain illegal activity. The illegal activity consists of crimes in the following categories: drugs, gambling, illegal liquor sales, prostitution. Only the police can refer a property into the program. 

Why Wright’s residence has been nuisance abated was not made clear.

WHIO-TV reached out Dayton police for comment on this report, but police did not respond to our request for an interview.

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Mom blasts school board for comment on lynching

Kyle Savoie, who lives in the neighborhood, said neighbors have been dealing with drugs and prostitution around that address. He said they have spoken with Dayton police about the situation. 

"Getting these kinds of houses out of the neighborhood is definitely going to be better in the community," said Savoie, who is raising a family. 

He admitted that the neighborhood seems to be improving. 

"It's kind of sickening.... If we can just get this house out of here, it's be much better," Savoie said.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Mom blasts Mason school board for mishandling comment about lynching

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:24 PM

Mother of Mason student speaks about “lynching” comment

The mother of a black Mason Middle School student blasted school officials Tuesday night for “trying to silence me” in her response to the incident involving a white teacher who told her son his classmates would “lynch” him.

Tanisha Agee-Bell was among the speakers in a standing-room-only crowd of mostly black residents at the first Mason school board meeting since the racial incident that drew national attention was unveiled this month.

 MORE: Mason school officials respond to racist remark by teacher

“What has shocked me is the cavalier way those racist statements were shared and the lack of urgency in which the district responded,” said Agee-Bell, who teared up at times during the meeting as other black residents voiced their complaints about the racial climate in Warren County’s largest school system.

She told the board her early efforts in following district procedures for complaining about the teacher’s remark were largely ignored.

After three weeks, Agee-Bell said, she came to the board in late December and asked for its help in mediating her complaints against veteran teacher Renee Thole.

Thole was initially reprimanded. Then -- after public outcries about leniency, led by Agee-Bell – Thole was ordered on paid administrative leave that includes racial sensitivity training.

MORE: Mason teacher in racial incident now placed on leave after mother complains

“Instead you tried to silence me, to save your image, under the guise of a personnel issue,” she told the board.

“I had no choice but to engage the (news) media,” she said of her choice to go public. 

“Your refusal to listen and the superintendent’s refusal to acknowledge the racist nature of the incident made clear you had no intention of living up to your mission of providing a safe and nurturing environment for all students.”

The Mason School Board meeting on Tuesday night, Jan. 23, 2018, was well attended in the aftermath of a controversial comment by a teacher to a student. (Nicholas Graham/Staff)

“You broke a sacred trust between us. While I appreciate that you finally did the right thing in my case, we will all forever wonder if it was because you recognized it was right to do, or if you were forced by a greater community that knows that right is always right,” said Agee-Bell.

She told the five-member board she hoped the members too would participate in the district’s ongoing and new racial sensitivity programs “so you can examine your own implicit bias and its impact on how you govern the district.”

Mason Superintendent Gail Kist-Kline and Board President Matthew Steele started the meeting with apologizes on how Agee-Bell’s complaint and the teacher’s initial punishment were handled.

Mason officials had earlier vowed to boost existing racial and cultural education programs as well as create new  diversity outreach efforts in the 10,400-student district.

Black students comprise 4 percent of Mason’s enrollment with 23.5 percent Asian, Pacific Islander the largest minority group of students. White, non-Hispanic students total 63 percent of enrollment.

MORE: Mason Middle School hit by another racial incident

Fellow African-American school parent Andrea King called on the board to measure its policies regarding racial sensitivity and determine “if they are implemented fairly.”

Jill Gorley, also a black resident, told the all-white board “we always talk about student diversity and inclusion but I think we have to talk about what our school board looks like. What do our teachers look like and who are we hiring?”

Board members said they heard the messages delivered.

Connie Yingling, in a reference to long-standing board policy not to address personnel issues during public meetings, said, “my intention was never to silence anyone.”

Fellow board member Courtney Allen said, “I appreciate those who spoke here tonight. It’s hard to hear of the difficulties some have had in the district.”

District Spokeswoman Tracey Carson was part of a board presentation at the meeting on how district officials are “accelerating” and adding to required racial and cultural sensitivity training for teachers and school staffers.

New programs will be installed with “an increased sense of urgency,” Carson said.

After the meeting, Agee-Bell said, “I was very pleased with the community support” from African American residents, whites and Asians in attendance

As for the district’s response so far, it “still has a lot of work to do.”

“A plan is great right, but we need to have the right people implementing the plan. It’s not that I expect them to not make mistakes but I expect them to handle them better,” she said.

“There’s this misconception that if you call out a racist behavior, you are calling somebody a racist and that’s not true. We’re saying racism exists … and we have to get rid of the systems that allow racism to exist,” she said.

Psychiatric patient fails to return to Cincinnati hospital, may be headed to Dayton area

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:04 PM

A patient who failed to return to Summit Behavior Healthcare Hospital at her appropriate time while on a pass may be headed to Montgomery County.

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The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services was notified of the apparent elopement of Jacqulyn Thompson, 40, at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday after she failed to return. 

Thompson is a patient of the state psychiatric hospital, 1101 Summit Road in Cincinnati.

Thompson has family in Montgomery County and could be headed there, Jamie Carmichael of OhioMHAS said Tuesday night.

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Police are working to find Thompson. She is 5-foot-5 and weighs 190 pounds with brown hair and blue eyes.

If you know Thompson, see her or know of her whereabouts, you are asked to notify the Cincinnati Police Department at 513-765-1212.

Superintendent: Discussion about aging Troy city schools needs to move forward

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 10:43 PM

The Troy City School District includes Kyle Elementary School on South Plum Street near downtown. CONTRIBUTED
HANDOUT
The Troy City School District includes Kyle Elementary School on South Plum Street near downtown. CONTRIBUTED(HANDOUT)

The leaders of Troy City Schools, who saw voters last fall defeat a bond issue to build two elementary buildings, began Tuesday night planting seeds for renewed discussion on the fate of aging elementary buildings.

Superintendent Eric Herman, at a school board work session, provided the board with a packet of information about the size, age, available space, detailed assessments of conditions and needs at each of the district's nine buildings.

The information, he said, was intended to help focus as "our conversation needs to move forward." 

RELATED: Troy schools levy fails

Much of the information was shared in 2017 as district leaders reviewed facilities options, convened community meetings and sought approval of a 4.61-mill bond issue for two new schools to house prekindergarten through grade six students on land the district proposed to buy off Ohio 55 at Nashville Road.

The funding plan included 33 percent state funding. The bond issue request was rejected by 60 percent of voters who participated in the November election. 

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"In my mind, you have older buildings and at some time have to do something about them," Herman said Tuesday.

The district's permanent improvement levy, which generates about $700,000 a year, can be used for projects such as roof or boiler work each year.

"It is just not enough" for the growing needs, he said. 

District Treasurer Jeff Price said another $225,000 to $250,000 is being used each year for maintenance-type projects in addition to the permanent improvements projects.