Trotwood Dollar General robbed; Police believe gunman hit other stores recently

Published: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 @ 8:35 PM

Weat Third Dollar General Robbery

A gunman wearing glasses has robbed the Dollar General, on West Third Street in Trotwood, and police believe he is the same assailant responsible for the robberies of three other area Dollar General stores since Friday.

RELATED: Dollar General in Clayton robbed Monday night

Tonight’s incident was dispatched about 8:13 p.m. and police have set up a perimeter.

RELATED: 2 Dollar General stores robbed Friday night

The other Dollar General armed robberies occurred Oct. 27 in Dayton and minutes later in Harrison Twp., and on Oct. 30 in Clayton.

We will update this developing report.

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Power outage ends for most near Miami Valley Hospital, UD student neighborhoods

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:17 PM
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 7:41 PM

Brown Street loses power

UPDATE @ 7:39 p.m.:  The DP&L online outage map now shows 126 customers without power along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the UD student neighborhoods, from Chambers Street to U.S. 35. 

A hospital administrator at MVH said the hospital is operating on generator power. 

Elevators there stopped immediately when the outage struck about 6:45 p.m., she said. Workers and security were able to get everyone off the cars, she said. 

No patients were put in danger because of the outage, she said.

INITIAL REPORT

Hundreds of businesses and residences along Brown Street, near Miami Valley Hospital and the University of Dayton student neighborhoods, are without power. 

According to the Dayton Power & Light online outage map, nearly 1,200 customers are affected. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Guest lists being checked to track drug dealers

Calls began coming into the newsroom just before 7 p.m. 

We’re hearing the outage extends along Brown Street, from Chambers Street west to U.S. 35. 

Jimmy’s Ladder 11, in the 900 block of Brown, and Subway, in the 1100 block, are among the businesses in the dark. 

We have a call into DP&L for details about the possible cause of the outage.

Stay with whio.com for breaking news.

With no deal on shutdown, GOP accuses Sherrod Brown of flip-flop

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 3:23 PM


            WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) speaks to reporters at the U.S. Capitol January 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. Congress is working to avoid a government shutdown ahead of a midnight Friday deadline. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
            Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) speaks to reporters at the U.S. Capitol January 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. Congress is working to avoid a government shutdown ahead of a midnight Friday deadline. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)(Aaron P. Bernstein)

As a possible shutdown grew nearer on Friday, Republicans took aim at Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, accusing him of a flip-flop over a temporary measure to keep the government open for four weeks.

Brown on Thursday appeared set to back the Republican-backed four-week plan because it extended a program known as CHIP that provides health insurance for more than 220,000 Ohio children. But Brown Friday said he would instead support an alternative plan to keep the government open for a few days while the Senate worked toward a longer-term deal.

It’s not clear, though, if even that proposal would gain congressional approval. President Donald Trump Friday invited Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer to the White House in hopes of negotiating a last minute deal, but the meeting broke up without any agreement.

Both parties seemed to be digging in as the deadline grew closer.

The plan to keep the government operating for a few days while negotiations continue was proposed by Republican Sens. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. Both have criticized the temporary spending measures that have become commonplace as a substitute for a long-term budget.

Congress has passed short-term spending resolutions three times since the fiscal year began in October.

RELATED: Five things to know if a shutdown happens

“We owe it to the people we work for to keep working and get the job done,” said Brown.

Republicans seized on the Democratic senator’s apparent change of heart over the four-week spending plan, which was approved by the House Thursday night and has the backing of the president.

Bob Salera of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, called Brown’s decision “alarming” but “unsurprising.”

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speaking on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” said it’s “unusual that you have this kind of opposition when there’s nothing objectionable there.”

RELATED: Dreamers rally in Dayton to support DACA

He said Democrats were hoping to get a resolution on DACA, an acronym for a program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, “but it’s an issue that hasn’t been resolved yet and it will take a little more time.”

“This is not a good way to score political points,” Portman said.

Last December, Brown voted against a temporary spending bill that kept the government open because it only extended CHIP money for three months instead of five years. In a floor speech the night the bill passed, Brown complained that a three-month extension “provides no certainty to the states that are running CHIP.”

RELATED: 7 things to know about the Children’s Health Insurance Program

But if he votes against the House version of the new spending bill to keep the government open for the next four weeks, Republicans can argue that Brown in essence is voting against a six-year extension of CHIP. Brown faces re-election in November.

In a statement Friday, Brown spokeswoman Jennifer Donohue said: “The fact is CHIP would have been passed months ago if Mitch McConnell and Republican leaders had listened to Senator Brown, but instead they’re holding the program hostage and using Ohio kids as political leverage. Senator Brown is continuing to fight for CHIP as part of a bipartisan budget deal, and if Republican leaders will bring up a clean CHIP bill, Sherrod will cast the first vote to pass it.”

The bill the Republican-led House passed Thursday would keep the federal government open through mid-February. Both House and Senate Democrats have balked at the deal, however, in part because it does not offer legal guarantees for DACA children, the so-called Dreamers.

Because of different rules in the two chambers, the House bill could pass by a simple majority, but the Senate needs 60 votes to approve it. If no agreement is reached, the federal government could partially close at midnight Friday for the first time since 2013.

RELATED: Trump and Schumer end private talks with no deal in hand

It would represent the first time that the federal government has closed when the House, Senate and presidency are all held by the same party.

Republicans made clear they will blame Senate Democrats if a shutdown occurs. House Speaker Paul Ryan called the last–minute maneuvering “absolutely, needless, completely unnecessary and wholly because of Senate Democrats trying to shut down the government.”

But a Washington Post-ABC News Poll released Friday indicated most Americans blamed the party in power: 48 percent of those polled blamed Republicans while 28 percent blamed Democrats.

What happens to veterans if the government shuts down?

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 6:36 PM

Dayton VA Medical Center STAFF FILE PHOTO
Staff Writer
Dayton VA Medical Center STAFF FILE PHOTO(Staff Writer)

Vital services for veterans will not be threatened if the government shuts down this weekend. 

The Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities, including the Dayton VA Medical Center, would remain open.

After previous partial shutdowns caused headaches for the VA, the department lobbied Congress to fund the VA on a two-year budget cycle. That exempts the department from the latest funding skirmish in Washington.

About 4 percent of the department’s workforce — nearly 16,000 workers — would be subject to furloughs during a shutdown, with almost half of that total coming from the Veterans Benefits Administration, according to Navy Times

Veterans would still get checks during a shutdown, but some education benefit programs would cease as well as the hearing of case appeals. 

MORE COVERAGE: 

Could your travel plans be impacted by the government shutdown?

Will a government shutdown delay my tax return?

With no deal on shutdown, GOP accuses Sherrod Brown of flip-flop

Will a shutdown happen? Wright-Patterson is in a holding pattern

Temporary funding prevents shutdown but hurts military, officials say

LOCAL IMPACT: Government shutdown threatens 100th birthday party for Springfield veteran

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:33 PM

Government shutdown threatens 100th birthday party for Springfield veteran

Kevin Black hadn’t thought about how the possibility of a government shutdown would affect his family.

World War II veteran Thomas Eubanks of Springfield turns 100 on Jan. 23. To celebrate, his grandson, Black, organized a birthday party for him at the Air Force Museum on Saturday.

With the possibility of the government shutting down tonight, the museum may not open, and the outlook of the party is up in the air.

“I don’t like the playing politics on this,” Black said. “They’re just playing games.”

RELATED: With no deal on shutdown, GOP accuses Sherrod Brown of flip-flop

The possible museum closure hadn’t occurred to Black or his family until this news organization contacted him about the party, which he had asked us to cover.

His family wasn’t the only ones uncertain of what will happen next.

Diana Bachert, spokeswoman for the Air Force Museum, said Friday night in a statement there is currently no order for the museum to shut down.

“However, we will follow procedures for an orderly shutdown when and how we are directed to do so,” Bachert said.

If Congress fails to come to an agreement on a continuing resolution (CR), a bill that appropriates money to different federal departments and programs, some federal agencies could come to a standstill.

MORE: What if UD and Wright State played this year in a Gem City Jam?

Black’s plan is for Congressman Warren Davidson to present Eubanks with a certificate, then Black will present his grandfather with letters from President Donald Trump and Gov. John Kasich.

But if there is no CR passed, Congress plans to stay in Washington and try to come to an agreement, meaning Davidson may have to miss the party.

Black said his grandfather doesn’t know about the planned celebration at the museum.

“He just thinks that a bunch of the grandkids are taking him to the museum,” Black said.

And he probably will continue to keep plans a secret, in case the museum isn’t open.

“(Eubanks) was sick a couple weeks after Christmas, and we didn’t think he was going to be able to go (to the museum). But he wants to go if they don’t shut down,” Black said.

MORE: What if a government shutdown happened? Five things to know

Eubanks is a widower; his wife Suzanne died in 2000. They were married for 59 years.

In WWII he served as tail gunner in the European theatre, an area of heavy fighting across the continent. He flew 13 combat missions from Knettishall Airfield in England.

“Tail gunner was the worst place to be,” said Black, who is retired from the Air Force.

He worked as a building inspector for Springfield for several years.

He lives in Oakwood Village Retirement Home in Springfield. He has four children, nine grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and four great, great-grandchildren.

“He’s got all his wits about him,” Black said.