breaking news


Sidney businessman accused of not paying people in Piqua

Published: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 11:32 PM

Duaine E. Liette
MIAMI COUNTY JAIL
Duaine E. Liette(MIAMI COUNTY JAIL)

A 57-year-old Sidney businessman is facing numerous felony theft charges after multiple people claimed he hired them to do work but didn’t pay them.

Duaine E. Liette has a preliminary hearing scheduled for Wednesday afternoon in Miami County Municipal Court. He was arraigned Friday on four felony theft charges and three misdemeanor theft counts and was released from custody on his own recognizance.

>>>Crime News: Sidney murder suspect could face life in prison

The cases were related to complaints from June 2015, June 2017 and July 2017, in which people stated they were hired to complete work for Liette but never received payment, according to Piqua police and court records.

Piqua police arrested Liette on Thursday at 1037 Broadway St., in Piqua. The house is owned by Sidney-based real estate company American Land Investments, of which Liette is listed as its principal; the business also has the same address as Liette’s residence, records show.

>>>Trending: Springfield man mailed drugs hidden in Play-Doh

Piqua police are urging anyone else who believe they may be victims to call 937-440-9111.

2 arrested in armed robbery at Springfield Verizon store

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:11 PM


            Anthony Dorone Edwards, 18, appeared in court Friday on charges relating to the Verizon Wireless store robbery on Thursday in Springfield. Jeff Guerini/Staff
Anthony Dorone Edwards, 18, appeared in court Friday on charges relating to the Verizon Wireless store robbery on Thursday in Springfield. Jeff Guerini/Staff

Two teenagers are now in custody and three others remain at large in connection with the armed robbery of a Springfield cell phone store.

Anthony Dorone Edwards, 18, of Springfield, was charged with aggravated robbery and carrying a concealed weapon. Javon Lashawn Reid, 18, of Dayton, also was charged with aggravated robbery.

DETAILS: Lawsuit against Clark County in jail death moves to federal court

Both appeared in Clark County Municipal Court on Friday and pleaded not guilty. Their bonds were set at $100,000 each.

Five men with their faces covered and holding guns entered Verizon Wireless on North Bechtle Avenue about 10:20 a.m. Thursday, according to court records.

The men entered the store shortly after it opened and allegedly yelled for everyone to get down, court records say. They allegedly threatened to shoot people inside of the business and demanded money and items of value.

Two employees allegedly were taken to the stock room at gunpoint, according to court records, and the suspects took an unknown amount of merchandise and an undisclosed amount of money.

READ MORE: Hunting photos lead to wildlife charges for New Carlisle man

The suspects left in a gold Chevy Impala and were last seen traveling down Ohio 4. An officer saw the vehicle some time later and chased it, according to court records, but then lost sight of it in the Dayton area.

Springfield police were later contacted by Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents who were observing a house in Trotwood. Three men arrived at the location, according to court records, and Edwards and Reid were taken into custody and the other got away.

DETAILS: Springfield Police: Man, 18, shot another in chest; Charges dropped against youth

Edwards allegedly was found with stolen phones and a handgun, court records say, and Reid allegedly admitted to police he was involved in the robbery.

Police are actively looking for the other suspects.

Indiana man charged with robbery with BB gun waives hearing

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:04 PM


            Brenden Parker, 27, of Aurora, Ind., was charged with aggravated robbery, a felony, and two misdemeanors, resisting arrest and obstructing official business, after he allegedly robbed a Middletown pharmacy on Jan. 10.
Brenden Parker, 27, of Aurora, Ind., was charged with aggravated robbery, a felony, and two misdemeanors, resisting arrest and obstructing official business, after he allegedly robbed a Middletown pharmacy on Jan. 10.

An Indiana man charged with aggravated robbery waived his preliminary hearing on Friday afternoon in Middletown Municipal Court, and his case was bound over to the Butler County Grand Jury for consideration.

Brenden Parker, 27, of Aurora, Ind., was charged with aggravated robbery, a felony, and two misdemeanors (resisting arrest and obstructing official business) after he allegedly robbed a Middletown pharmacy on Jan. 10. Parker allegedly showed a female clerk a gun — that later was determined to be a BB gun — and demanded cash. He allegedly left the Rite Aid with about $280 in cash, according to Middletown police.

Parker appeared Friday with his court-appointed attorney, James Calhoun, before Municipal Court Judge James Sherron. Sherron kept Parker’s bond at $256,000 — $250,000 for aggravated robbery and $3,000 each for the misdemeanors.

At Parker’s arraignment last week, Sherron set the bond that high because of the “serious nature” of the charges, he said.

MORE: Paralyzed woman: Life ‘a living hell’ without stolen van

Last week, during his arraignment, Parker seemed confused and disorientated while standing before Sherron. Middletown police said after Parker was arrested on Jan. 10 he was acting “strange,” so he was examined at Atrium Medical Center before he was transported to the city jail.

Police believe Parker may have family in the Middletown, though there didn’t appear to be any friends or relatives in the courtroom during his preliminary hearing. Franklin police said Parker was charged with petty theft there in 2009, and he was arrested two years later for a failure to appear.

Parker allegedly pulled out what the clerk thought was a black handgun and told the female clerk: “Give me the money in the cash register and I will not harm you,” according to the Middletown police report.

The cashier told Parker she couldn’t do that and he repeated: “I do not want to hurt you. Give me the money.”

During the foot pursuit that followed, a Middletown police officer deployed his taser, but the taser was ineffective because both probes missed the suspect, the report said. Once the subject was caught, he refused to be handcuffed and two “baton strikes” were used to “gain compliance” on him, the report said.

After he was apprehended, he was found to be in possession of the stolen money. Canine officer Bear found a black BB gun near where the suspect was located.

Paralyzed woman: Life ‘a living hell’ without stolen van

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 1:16 PM

She can’t get to her many doctor appointments

For the last two weeks, a paralyzed Middletown woman has been without the van that used to drive her to doctor appointments.

Shirley English, 77, paralyzed from the waist down after an auto accident in 2007, said her 2003 tan Dodge Caravan was stolen from her residence on Crawford Street earlier this month.

English said she allowed a former homeless man who lived with her to use the van to drive to and from his fast-food restaurant job on Breiel Boulevard in Middletown. She said the man used the van on Jan. 4, and she hasn’t seen him or the van since. She said the man picked up his check from the restaurant on Jan. 4, and he since has been fired.

MORE POPULAR NEWS

Altercation may have preceded Butler County jail suicide death

Badin High School plans $1.8M expansion as enrollment grows

She filed a Middletown police report on Jan. 9, and the missing van was entered into the National Crime Information Center. Lt. Scott Reeve from the Middletown Police Department said officers are looking for the stolen van.

Until it’s found, English said she’s stuck at home, unable to make her doctor appointments for her heart and lung medical issues.

“My life has been a living hell,” English said Friday morning while sitting in her wheelchair holding her chihuahua. “I have nightmares like you wouldn’t believe. I can’t sleep at a night. I’m about ready to flip out. I feel like somebody has (taken) my life.”

She wiped away some tears, then added: “Nobody has the right to take what belongs to me, especially when it can save my life.”

English said she has a signed piece of paper that said the man was allowed to use the van between 3 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. on nights he was working. At noon on Jan. 4, she noticed her car and house keys missing from an end table.

Up until the incident, English said the man was “a pretty good guy.” He had lived with her since October, she said.

Her family has sent the man text messages, but he hasn’t responded, she said.

“I need help,” she said. “I need help getting my automobile back.”

On her front door, she has posted two signs: “NOTICE: CAMERA. If you can read this your image has already been taken and unloaded to the internet.”

And, “No nuts or screwballs or thieves by order of police and prosecutor. Thank you.”

White supremacists responsible for most extremist killings in 2017, ADL says

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 2:36 PM

A man tends a makeshift candlelight vigil for those who died and were injured when a car plowed into a crowd of anti-fascist counter-demonstrators marching near a downtown shopping area August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The car allegedly plowed through a crowd, and at least one person has died from the incident, following the shutdown of the 'Unite the Right' rally by police after white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' and counter-protesters clashed near Emancipation Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Win McNamee/Getty Images
A man tends a makeshift candlelight vigil for those who died and were injured when a car plowed into a crowd of anti-fascist counter-demonstrators marching near a downtown shopping area August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The car allegedly plowed through a crowd, and at least one person has died from the incident, following the shutdown of the 'Unite the Right' rally by police after white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' and counter-protesters clashed near Emancipation Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)(Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Far-right extremists – particularly white supremacists – were responsible for more than half of the deaths attributed to extremists in the United States last year, according to a report issued this week by the Anti-Defamation League.

>> Read more trending news

Twenty of the 34 extremist-related killings in 2017 were carried out by far-right extremists, more than double the number that group was responsible for in 2016, according to the ADL’s annual report on extremist-related killings in America. 

Eighteen of those 20 deaths were caused by white supremacists, according to the ADL.

The incidents noted by the ADL included the August 2017 death of Heather Heyer, 32, who was protesting a rally organized by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, when authorities said she was mowed down by a vehicle driven by James Alex Fields, 20.

>> Related: 3 dead, 35 injured after 'Unite the Right' rally sparks violence in Charlottesville

“We cannot ignore the fact that white supremacists are emboldened, and as a society we need to keep a close watch on recruitment and rallies such as Charlottesville, which have the greatest potential to provoke and inspire violence,” ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said in a news release.

The deadliest incident of last year, however, was carried out by an Islamic extremist. Eight people died in October when a man identified as Sayfullo Saipov, 29, plowed a pickup truck into bicyclists and pedestrians on a path in New York City.

>> Related: Who is Sayfullo Saipov, New York City terror attack suspect?

Including the October killings, a total of nine deaths were attributed to Islamic extremists, according to the ADL. Black nationalists were responsible for five of the killings reported in 2017, according to the ADL.

“These findings are a stark reminder that domestic extremism is a serious threat to our safety and security,” Greenblatt said. “We saw two car-ramming attacks in the U.S. last year -- one from an Islamic terrorist and another from a white supremacist in Charlottesville -- and the number of deaths attributed to white supremacists increased substantially. The bottom line is we cannot ignore one form of extremism over another. We must tackle them all.”

The ADL urged officials to “use their bully pulpit to speak out against racism, anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry at every opportunity” to mitigate the extremist threat. The ADL also recommended that federal and state officials create programs to help those trying to leave extremist movements and to “thwart (the) recruitment of disaffected or alienated Americans.”