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Dayton women win 12th straight game, stay perfect in A-10

Published: Sunday, February 04, 2018 @ 4:37 PM
Updated: Sunday, February 04, 2018 @ 4:53 PM


            Dayton women’s basketball coach Shauna Green looks on during Sunday’s game vs. VCU at UD Arena. The Flyers won 74-64 to improve to 11-0 in Atlantic 10 play. John Cummings/CONTRIBUTED
Dayton women’s basketball coach Shauna Green looks on during Sunday’s game vs. VCU at UD Arena. The Flyers won 74-64 to improve to 11-0 in Atlantic 10 play. John Cummings/CONTRIBUTED

Dayton’s women’s basketball teams keeps rolling along

And the Flyers did so while paying tribute to those who paved the way for them.

»ARCHDEACON: UD women’s coach a winner on court, in life

»ESPN Bracketology: Flyers a No. 10 seed in tourney

The Flyers rolled to their 12th consecutive win Sunday, cruising to a 74-64 win over VCU. The Flyers recognized past players at halftime of their annual Pink Game for Breast Cancer Awareness at UD Arena.

The win moved the Flyers to 18-4 overall and more importantly kept them perfect at 11-0 in the Atlantic 10 Conference.

Dayton led 40-20 at halftime, and while never challenged on the scoreboard, had to find ways to grind it out against a Rams’ team that caught a second wind in the fourth quarter when the Flyers were getting some minutes for the healed walking wounded.

“We are so used to a certain allotment of available bodies than when we were up 20-plus, I wanted to get them some minutes,” Dayton coach Shauna Green said. “We made some mistakes, but a lot of it is them getting back to getting game minutes and learning to play together again. It is what it is.”

VCU never got closer than eight in the final quarter, but that came with 1:19 remaining.

Jenna Burdette hit a pair of free throws and Alex Harris a short jumper off a rebound for a 74-62 lead with 37 seconds remaining.

“I think towards the end we got a little complacent,” said Burdette, who led the Flyers with 23 points. “We need to find a way to stay intense the whole game because I think we are really energized before the game.”

Dayton led by as many as 23 in the third quarter and took a 59-36 lead into the final quarter.

The Flyers struggled early and clung to a 9-8 lead with 3:38 remaining in the first quarter before starting to take off.

Baskets by Burdette and Lauren Cannatelli opened a 10-0 run to close the quarter that ended on a basket by Jordan Wilmoth.

VCU got as close as eight in the second quarter, 25-17, but the Flyers again took off.

JaVonna Layfield ran off four straight and a basket by Jayla Scaife pushed the lead to 33-17 with 4:13 remaining, forcing VCU to take a timeout.

The Dayton defense held VCU scoreless the final three minutes of the half as they extended the lead to 40-20. VCU shot percent from the floor.

Scaife added 13 and Layfield had a double-double with 10 points and 14 rebounds and Harris added 10 points. VCU was led by Taya Robinson with 14.

Dayton held VCU to 37-percent from the floor after the Rams enjoyed a 60-percent fourth quarter (9-15). Dayton hit 29 of 59 for the game and was nine of 17 from three (53 percent).

Dayton travels to UMass on Wednesday and George Washington on Sunday before returning home Feb. 11 against Fordham in a crucial A-10 game.

WEDNESDAY’S GAME

Dayton at UMass, 7 p.m.

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Reports: MLS to Cincinnati announcement likely next week

Published: Thursday, May 24, 2018 @ 10:42 AM
Updated: Thursday, May 24, 2018 @ 11:24 AM


            FC Cincinnati lost to New York Red Bulls 3-2 in overtime of their 2017 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup semifinal game Tuesday, Aug. 15 at Nippert Stadium on the University of Cincinnati Campus in Cincinnati. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF
FC Cincinnati lost to New York Red Bulls 3-2 in overtime of their 2017 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup semifinal game Tuesday, Aug. 15 at Nippert Stadium on the University of Cincinnati Campus in Cincinnati. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

Major League Soccer is expected to announce Cincinnati as its next expansion club next week.

An announcement featuring FC Cincinnati and MLS officials is expected Tuesday, according to multiple media reports. The Cincinnati Enquirer was the first to report the news.

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FC Cincinnati sent out its practice schedule with Monday and Tuesday blocked off as “no media access during training,” which is uncharacteristic of a club that at most has one day a week with no availability for media.

The team also sent out an email earlier this week to season-ticket holders informing them the organization is trying to learn more about the perception of the club and other local professional sports teams and asking them to participate in a survey, which was conducted by a third party affiliated with MLS. The first focus group is scheduled to meet Wednesday, which CincinnatiSoccerTalk.com speculated would coincide with an expansion bid being awarded to FCC.

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When asked Monday about a possible announcement coming next week, FCC spokesperson Lizz Summers said the team did not have any information to release and MLS would be the one to address any announcements regarding expansion. MLS executive vice president of communications Dan Courtemanche did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

MLS awarded a bid to Nashville in December and had expected to announce another team at that time as well but delayed a decision as finalists Cincinnati, Detroit and Sacramento all had elements of their bid that needed addressed.

Cincinnati was still sorting out its soccer-specific stadium plans at the time. However, the club finally completed its bid with a West End stadium deal passing with a 5-4 City Council Vote on April 9. The club signed a Community Benefits Agreement was signed with a group representing West End residents last week.

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Springfield standout: ‘It’s all about getting to state’

Published: Thursday, May 24, 2018 @ 11:01 AM

Springfield senior Quincy Scott was third in the long jump in the D-I regional track and field meet at Wayne on Wed., May 23, 2018. MARC PENDLETON / STAFF

Other than not getting off a legal jump in the Greater Western Ohio Conference meet two weeks ago, Springfield High School senior Quincy Scott had been unbeatable in the long jump.

That changed in the first day of the Division I regional track and field meet at Wayne on Wednesday. The defending D-I state runner-up, Scott sank to third, the first time he hadn’t won this season other than the conference.

»IT’S A RECORD: Lakota East flash passes mark that stood since 1990

»PHOTO GALLERY: D-I district track at Wayne

“It’s all about getting to state and the bigger picture,” Scott said. “Next week is when I make my money. It’s just move on to Friday and get ready for state in four events. It’s like a win-lose situation (on Wednesday).”

The top four regional placers advance to next week’s season-ending state track and field meets at Ohio State University’s Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Columbus. Wednesday’s only running final was the 4x800 relay; all other racing was to qualify for Friday’s finals. About half the field events were finals; the other half will be contested on Friday.

»FACEBOOK: For more high school sports you should like Marc Pendleton

»RELATED: Butler making surprise D-I baseball run

The first day of the D-III regional also was held on Wednesday at Troy. It too is on the same schedule as D-I and will resume on Friday.

Scott was part of an outstanding boys long jump competition that could repeat at state. His final jump of 23-5.25 pulled him even with Centerville junior Yariel Soto, who led with other better jumps. Butler senior Daiton Sharp answered with a final leap of 23-11.

»TWITTER: You should like @MarcPendleton

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That matched one of the oldest regional records that initially was set by Jeff Parks of Dayton Roosevelt in 1971 (Class AAA), a span of 47 years.

Scott unloaded a qualifying-best 10.67 in the 100, was third in the 200 (21.79) and anchored the 4x100 relay (42.32) to a third best. Also on the relay were Austin Tyree, Jacob Yost and Michael Brown-Stephens.

“This is a very special meet for me,” Scott said. “My birthday is on Friday and it’s a regional final. My main problem was I was just focusing too much on the meet. I was just worrying too much, but I’m not going to be too hard on myself.”

»OHSAA: No more stacking teams

»RELATED: D-I baseball sectional photo gallery

Tyree, a junior, also advanced to the 300 hurdles final with a third-best time (38.65).

• The Tecumseh boys were seventh in the D-I 4x800 relay (8:06.47) and the Arrows’ girls 4x400 relay advanced to the final (4:06.62).

»RELATED: Senior basketball standout a one-season wonder

• West Liberty-Salem loaded up the four girls relays in the D-III regional at Troy. The Tigers placed third in the 4x800 (9:40.97). Its 4x100 relay (50.67) was second, the 4x400 (4:06.73) third and the 4x200 (1:46.79) fifth in finals qualifying. WL-Salem senior Raiph LeVan also was third in boys 400 qualifying (51.35).

Southeastern junior Charlie Bertemes was fourth in the discus (143-0) and advanced to the D-III state meet. However, Yellow Springs senior Amani Wagner was fifth in the shot put (36-8), missing state by one place.

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East sophomore betters D-I regional 100 record that stood since 1990

Published: Thursday, May 24, 2018 @ 12:28 AM


            Lakota East sophomore Serena Clark (near left) bested a 100 meters record that had stood since 1990 with an 11.79 in qualifying during the first day of the D-I regional track and field meet at Wayne High School in Huber Heights on Wed., May 23, 2018. MARC PENDLETON / STAFF
            MARC PENDLETON / STAFF
Lakota East sophomore Serena Clark (near left) bested a 100 meters record that had stood since 1990 with an 11.79 in qualifying during the first day of the D-I regional track and field meet at Wayne High School in Huber Heights on Wed., May 23, 2018. MARC PENDLETON / STAFF(MARC PENDLETON / STAFF)

Lakota East sprinter Serena Clark eclipsed a regional record that had stood since 1990 during the first day of the Division I track and field meet at Wayne High School on Wednesday.

Just a sophomore, Clark’s clocking of 11.79 in 100 meters qualifying bested the previous record of 11.81 that D’Andre Hill of Cincinnati Mt. Healthy established in 1990. Hill was an All-American at LSU and ran for the United States in the 1996 Olympic Games at Atlanta.

»RELATED: Senior basketball standout a one-season wonder

»FACEBOOK: For more high school sports you should like Marc Pendleton

Clark also qualified first in the 200 (24.42) and ran on East’s 4x100 relay (47.41) that qualified first.

Only the 4x800 relay was a final on Wednesday. All other racing was to qualify for Friday’s finals. About half the field events also were finals on Wednesday.

»RELATED: Butler making surprise D-I baseball run

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The top four regional placers advance to next week’s season-ending D-I state meet at Ohio State University’s Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in Columbus.

East also will feature senior Dustin Horter on Friday. He enters the 1600 (4:12.12) and the 3200 (9:10.34) among the state’s best. He’s also the defending D-I state 1600 champ.

»OHSAA: No more stacking teams

»RELATED: D-I baseball sectional photo gallery

»PHOTO GALLERY: D-I district track at Wayne

Friday’s remaining field events begin at 5 p.m. and running finals at 6:30 p.m. The D-II regional is at Piqua on Thursday (5 and 6 p.m.) and Saturday (11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.). The D-III regional is at Troy on Wednesday and Friday (5 and 6 p.m.).

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Hartman: The NFL tries to clean up its national anthem morass

Published: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 @ 1:44 PM

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - FEBRUARY 04:  Pink sings the national anthem prior to Super Bowl LII between the New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles at U.S. Bank Stadium on February 4, 2018 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - FEBRUARY 04: Pink sings the national anthem prior to Super Bowl LII between the New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles at U.S. Bank Stadium on February 4, 2018 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)(Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

The NFL’s new national anthem policy probably makes about as much sense as anything the league could have done after two years of being damaged both coming and going on this topic. 

No one should be required to acknowledge national symbols if they feel those symbols don’t represent them, but there is a difference between being absent and being disrespectful. 

The line there might be fine, but it is still there, and it is significant. 

RELATED: NFL announces changes to pregame rules

Allowing players to opt out of pregame ceremonies means they don’t have to compromise their beliefs and allows those who value those couple of moments to reflect and pay respect to do so as well. 

Obviously those who choose to stay in the locker room will simultaneously be going on the record that they have something to express, and there is no doubt they will not have trouble finding anyone to ask what that might be. 

As for those whose experience was absolutely ruined by the players’ kneeling, they might be wise to look around and make sure everyone around them is paying attention and being respectful, too, but maybe that’s another story. 

All along there have surely been people who would support the players’ actions no matter what they did and people who would oppose them no matter what they did. 

RELATED: Jim Brown supports Kaepernick 100 percent but wouldn’t sit for anthem

The time that the actual act of sitting or kneeling (which was a laudable attempt at compromise) really matters expired a long time ago. 

Despite the serious flaws in the original method and the divisiveness of Colin Kaepernick’s initial explanation for sitting, the potential converts have been converted. 

The holdouts aren’t listening, and continuing to try to get a message across in the same way is senseless (as was the President’s decision to drudge it all back last year). 

The NFL has taken up many of the causes of its players, and the change in awareness, at least of those who will ever be willing to listen, has come. That doesn’t mean the causes the players are fighting for are won, but there are other battles more wise to fight because they can actually be won, too. 

That awareness also means many more people are ready, willing and able to share the story the players want to tell. 

Wasn’t that the point in the first place? 

Because if it was, arguing over how to protest seems like a pretty big waste of time. 

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