Atlantic 10 Tournament: Dayton women advance past VCU

Published: Friday, March 03, 2017 @ 1:06 PM
Updated: Friday, March 03, 2017 @ 1:09 PM


            Jenna Burdette (14) goes after a loose ball during Dayton against Saint Louis on Feb. 22, 2017, at UD Arena. David Jablonski/Staff
Jenna Burdette (14) goes after a loose ball during Dayton against Saint Louis on Feb. 22, 2017, at UD Arena. David Jablonski/Staff

Last year Dayton guard Kelley Austria watched her team’s first game in the conference tournament on television, the victim of a season-ending knee injury that limited her to seven contests.

She was not in Richmond as the Flyers fell to No. 9 seed George Mason in the 2016 Atlantic 10 Conference tournament.

RELATED: Kelley Austria named top defender in A-10

This March the redshirt senior was part of happier opener, as the Flyers scored the first 12 points of the game and beat No. 8 seed VCU 77-61 in the quarterfinals of the conference tourney.

“The game got a little ugly but a win is a win,” Austria said after game as she iced both knees.

The top-seeded Flyers advance to the semifinals at 11 a.m. on Saturday against Saint Louis, which beat Fordham 68-58 on Friday.

Dayton (20-9) was paced by Jenna Burdette, who had 23 points and four assists and made eight of 10 shots from the field. She did not play Feb. 4 in a 20-point win against VCU because of a leg injury.

Lauren Cannatelli came off the bench to score 11 points for the Flyers, including three of five from 3-point range. Reserve post player Andrijana Cvitkovic had 11 points, starter Alex Harris had eight points and eight rebounds and Austria had seven points and three assists.

“I tried to do my job,” Cvitkovic said. “VCU was making runs. We were keeping them under control.”

It was the first game for UD since Feb. 22, the day the Flyers beat Saint Louis in overtime to win a share of the A-10 title. The Rams advanced by beating rival Richmond last Sunday as the tourney began at home sites.

“We knew coming in this would be a tough game,” Dayton coach Shauna Green said. “We made plays when we had to. This time of the year it is about finding a way: who is going to execute when you have to. Especially coming off eight days off, you never know how you are going to play. I am proud of the effort.”

The Flyers made 8 of 14 shots from 3-point range. VCU had 23 offensive rebounds but could not convert enough of them and trailed 37-27 at halftime. Dayton outscored VCU 18-9 in the second quarter.

Dayton made it 50-37 midway through the third quarter on a 3-pointer by Burdette.

The Rams cut the lead to 62-55 with 6:45 left in the game but a basket by Burdette made it 67-55 with 3:10 go and the Flyers were not threatened down the stretch.

RELATED: UD ‘getting closer’ to moving ahead with arena upgrade

“We wanted to shut down the 3-point line,” VCU head coach Beth O’Boyle said. “That second quarter really hurt us.”

VCU (16-15) was paced by GG Goodhope, who had 12 points, and reserve Isis Thorpe had 11.

The Flyers had four starters with two fouls in the second quarter, which forced Green to use her bench. Dayton had nine players score and the bench came through with 27 points.

“I think it was good for us,” Burdette said of less playing time for the starters. “I guess fouls are frustrating. We always talk about bringing more energy off the bench.”

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1952 Topps Mickey Mantle baseball card fetches record  $2.88 million at auction

Published: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 12:01 AM
Updated: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 12:01 AM

A 1952 Topps baseball card of Mickey Mantle sold for $2.88 million in an online auction that ended Thursday night.
Professional Sports Authenticator
A 1952 Topps baseball card of Mickey Mantle sold for $2.88 million in an online auction that ended Thursday night.(Professional Sports Authenticator)

Mickey Mantle baseball cards are coveted by collectors, and the 1952 Topps card of the New York Yankees’ Hall of Fame outfielder remains the gold standard for post-World War II collectibles.

>> Read more trending news

The bar was raised even higher Thursday night, as a ’52 Mantle in mint condition -- graded PSA 9 by Professional Sports Authenticator -- sold for $2,880,000 in an online event hosted by Heritage Auctions. That price, which includes the buyer’s premium, is the most ever paid for a post-World War II trading card and the second-highest for any trading card, Sports Collectors Daily reported. 

The highest amount was $3.12 million for a T206 Honus Wagner card sold in October 2016 by Goldin Auctions.

“The 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle is more than just a baseball card,” PSA President Joe Orlando said in a news release. “It is pop culture art and the symbol of the card collecting hobby itself.”

There were 21 bids cast for the Mantle card, which was part of Heritage Auctions’ Spring Sports Card Catalog Auction. The previous record for a 1952 Mantle graded PSA 9 was set in 2006, when Memory Lane Auction sold one for $282,588, PSA said in its release. The previous record for a Mantle card, regardless of grade, was a PSA 8.5 that sold in 2016 for $1.13 million.

The card that was sold Thursday night was owned by former NFL offensive lineman Evan Mathis, who played for six teams during his professional career. Wednesday night, Mathis spoke with with ESPN’s Bob Ley about the card and his love for collecting. Mathis said he sold the card to finance a new home in Tennessee, Sports Collectors Daily reported.

Mantle’s 1952 card is not the slugger’s true rookie card, but it is the first card that Topps issued. The 1951 Bowman card of the Mick is considered his rookie card, and one graded PSA 9 sold during this week’s Heritage Auctions sale for $750,000.

“The 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle card captures the attention of baseball fans, serious collectors, and investors alike and this auction made it one of the most valuable sports collectibles in existence,” Chris Ivy, Director of Sports Auctions at Heritage Auctions, told Sports Collectors Daily. “It’s a phenomenal price, a world record, but it’s also the natural progression of a trend we’ve seen building for years.”

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Transfer from Vanderbilt joining Dayton women’s basketball program

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 12:49 PM

Dayton huddles with coach Shauna Green after practice on Thursday, March 15, 2018, at the KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Ky.
Staff Writer
Dayton huddles with coach Shauna Green after practice on Thursday, March 15, 2018, at the KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Ky.(Staff Writer)

Erin Whalen, a 6-foot-1 guard/forward from Charlotte, N.C., is transferring from Vanderbilt to the Dayton Flyers women’s basketball program.

Whalen said she told Dayton coach Shauna Green of her decision on Thursday. Dayton has not officially announced the news.

“I am super excited about the opportunity,” Whalen told the Dayton Daily News on Friday.

» RELATED: Green excited about Dayton’s future

Whalen will have to sit out the 2018-19 season. She has two seasons of eligibility remaining. She averaged 7.4 points and 1.8 rebounds last season at Vanderbilt. As a freshman, she averaged 9.1 points and 2.8 rebounds per game and made the All-SEC freshman team.

Whalen started 10 games as a freshman and two as a sophomore. Vanderbilt finished 7-24 last season and 14-16 in Whalen’s freshman season.

» PHOTOS: Dayton vs. Marquette in NCAA tournament

Whalen was a five-star recruit in 2016, according to the ESPN HoopGurlz rankings. She ranked 46th overall in the class. She was the North Carolina Gatorade Player of the Year as a senior at the Providence Day School.

Whalen is the third player from a power-five conference to transfer to Dayton in the past 12 months. Julia Chandler (Syracuse) and Araion Bradshaw (South Carolina) transferred to Dayton last season and sat out the season. They will make their Dayton debuts in the 2018-19 season.

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Sports Today: Sorting out reactions to the Reds’ firing Bryan Price

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 11:09 AM

CINCINNATI, OH - AUGUST 06: Homer Bailey #34 of the Cincinnati Reds reacts as he is taken out of the game by manager Bryan Price in the fourth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals at Great American Ball Park on August 6, 2017 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
Joe Robbins/Getty Images
CINCINNATI, OH - AUGUST 06: Homer Bailey #34 of the Cincinnati Reds reacts as he is taken out of the game by manager Bryan Price in the fourth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals at Great American Ball Park on August 6, 2017 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)(Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

For the second day in a row, we had some breaking news first thing in the morning. Here is my tribute to Earle Bruce, who passed away this morning after 87 years of filling the world with passion and energy for football and Ohio State. 

Here’s what else is going on… 

Cincinnati Reds general manager Dick Williams said pretty much exactly what I wanted to hear in regards to the firing of Bryan Price. 

“We’re very focused on creating a sense of urgency for these guys to perform now,” Williams said yesterday. “We talk about rebuilding, and there’s things going on away from the field and in the farm system and investments in the franchise that are part of that rebuilding process, but when guys show up to work every day, they need to have a sense of urgency to win that day. They need to take care of the details on the field. They need to play hard. They need to play smart. They need to play it right. That we can control, and we need to get this team playing that way because we know they have the ability to do it. That is the short-team immediate focus.”

Beyond that, I have seen the argument made that firing Price was pointless because the team wasn’t really good enough to win. 

That’s a pretty dumb way to look at it. 

For one thing, it ignores just how terrible the Reds have been since the start of the season. 

It’s not as if we’re talking about a squad that is a few games under .500. 

They have not been below average. 

They have been dreadful — historically bad. 

Cincinnati’s record is 3-15, and there’s no reason to think the Reds should have many, if any, more wins the way they have played… except if like me you think Price botched a handful of chances to win games with head-scratching late-game decisions. 

I’ve also seen it suggested the whole organization is rotten and they need to start over. 

This isn’t completely out of the question, but it’s a pretty big overreaction at this point. 

Yes multiple people — players, managers, management, ownership, etc — had to make mistakes for the team to be in this predicament, but many of them are already gone. 

Walt Jocketty blew the end of the last era of good times with help from Dusty Baker, his scouting department and at least some on the development side. 

Several years of terrible drafts and an inability to find cheap options to fill out the bench and the bullpen at the major-league level were major issues, and Baker’s attempts to maximize a flawed roster were generally inept. 

RELATED: Barry Larkin on deck?

Jocketty badly misplayed the start of the rebuild, perhaps because ownership wouldn’t let hims start it as soon as he needed to. 

Whatever the reason, the Reds waited too long to start the rebuild at the major-league level. 

That prevented them from maximizing the return on players like Johnny Cueto, Aroldis Chapman and Jay Bruce and exacerbated the effect of those bad drafts. 

(They were able to sell high on Todd Frazier and got surprisingly good returns on some other players who weren’t as high-profile, like Mike Leake, Alfredo Simon and Dan Straily.) 

More recently, they seem to have figured out a few things in the draft. The past two efforts have been rated very highly. 

Help is on the way, and there are good pieces in place already. 

Health remains an issue, of course. Figuring out if anything can be done about that is not easy. 

Williams has only been in the big chair for about a year and a half, and I’m willing to see how his early moves play out. 

Waiting on young pitchers to develop can be maddening, but it is also pretty clearly their best option given their market and the ballpark. 

They talked about accountability when Baker was fired. 

Price never answered that bell. 

As he was shown the door, a need to create a winning culture was identified. 

Will anything change? 

We’ll see. 

It couldn’t have gotten much worse… 

Meanwhile, the firing of Price yesterday morning obscured a few other noteworthy items. 

Chief among them was Hunter Greene’s second start

Watching this talented young guy develop is already fascinating. 

The South Bend Cubs were clearly sitting on his fastball, and they hit it hard a few times. 

He didn’t hesitate to go to his secondary pitches, working curves and changes to varying degrees of success. 

Having to pitch through a pretty hard rain for 10 minutes or so seemed to frustrate him, but that’s understandable. 

He still hung in there and showed his competitiveness. 

It was less than three innings, but it was encouraging to see his mental makeup and tools despite his inexperience… 

Dragons pitcher Hunter Greene went 2.1 innings in a rain-delayed second start, a 4-1 defeat of the visiting South Bend Cubs at Fifth Third Field in Dayton on Wed., April 18, 2018. MARC PENDLETON / STAFF

Ohio State held spring exit interviews with its assistant coaches Wednesday, and the most noteworthy local development regarded Josh Myers

Coach Greg Studrawa revealed the Miamisburg product overcame some struggles early in the spring to turn in a strong final two weeks as he learns to play center. 

He might have to settle for the backup job to fifth-year senior Brady Taylor, but that’s not a bad place to be for an offensive lineman still only a year out of high school. 

Defensive line coach Larry Johnson also had great things to say about Wayne grad Robert Landers, a tackle who has shown a lot of growth as a leader...

Ohio State offensive line coach Greg Studrawa breaks down the competition between Brady Taylor and Miamisburg grad Josh Myers to be the starting center this fall.

Finally we have the Cincinnati Bengals schedule

This slate looks tougher to me than the NFL’s calculation of last year’s winning percentages indicates it should be. 

Maybe that’s just a function of being unsure of how good the Bengals will actually be. 

 

The Browns and Colts are rebuilding, but those AFC West teams and the Dolphins all have the potential to be playoff contenders with the right moves so there is a high potential for variance. 

Of course, last season I was incorrectly optimistic about the Bengals based in large part because I thought their schedule was pretty easy. 

That’s not exactly how it worked out. 

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Who are the candidates to be the next Reds manager?

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 3:13 PM

Former Reds Barry Larkin (11), Eric Davis (44) and Paul O'Neill pose with the World Series trophy during a 25th anniversary celebration of the 1990 World Series championship on Friday, April 24, 2015, at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati. David Jablonski/Staff
HANDOUT/David Jablonski/Staff
Former Reds Barry Larkin (11), Eric Davis (44) and Paul O'Neill pose with the World Series trophy during a 25th anniversary celebration of the 1990 World Series championship on Friday, April 24, 2015, at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati. David Jablonski/Staff(HANDOUT/David Jablonski/Staff)

If members of the Cincinnati Reds front office read the Facebook comments during their search for the next Reds manager, they’ll look at everyone from Barry Larkin to Pete Rose to Chris Sabo, Sean Casey and even Dusty Baker.

One of those names might be a legitimate candidate, but it’s too early to tell who the Reds will hire as a replacement for Bryan Price, who was fired on Thursday in his fifth season. Reds General Manager Dick Williams did not put a timetable on when the Reds would hire their next manager.

“We will be undergoing a thorough and exhaustive process to identify the next full-time manager,” Williams said. “We have good internal candidates, but that will be a process we need to undergo, and it makes more sense to do that toward the end of the season because any internal candidates, for the most part, are not going to be available until then.”

» RELATED: Williams says players need to have a ‘sense of urgency’

Below is a glance at some of the names that might get thrown around in the coming months:

Larkin: Fans have clamored for years for the Reds to hire Larkin, who played shortstop for the Reds from 1986-2004 and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2012. Of course, Larkin has never been a manager at any level, and according to a report, he angered some in the Reds organization about his comments about some young players in the organization saying they want to see him be the Reds manager one day. Price was still the manager at the time. Larkin is in his third season as a special assistant to the general manager.

» COMMENTARY: Marcus Hartman: Firing Bryan Price shows winning might actually matter to Cincinnati Reds

Eric Davis: If you’re throwing 1990 World Champions into the mix, you might as well mention Davis, who has been a special assistant to the GM since 2008.

Lou Piniella: And if you’re throwing Larkin and Davis into the mix, you might as well mention the manager of the 1990 Reds. He’s now a special advisor to baseball operations.

Jim Riggleman: He’ll start his stint as interim Reds manager on Friday in St. Louis. He has 12 years of experience in the big leagues but only one winning season.

» REACTION: Social media reacts to firing of Reds fire manager Bryan Price

Pat Kelly: Kelly will serve as bench coach under Riggleman. He was the manager of the Triple-A Louisville Bats and managed Double-A Pensacola the last three seasons.

Buddy Bell: Here’s another name in the Reds front office with managing experience. Bell managed the Detroit Tigers, Colorado Rockies and Kansas City Royals but had only one winning season in nine years.

» MCCOY: Firing Price won’t fix Reds’ issues

Joe Girardi: The longtime New York Yankees manager, who lost his job in 2017, likely will hear his name mentioned in connection to this job. In the category of recently-fired managers who deserve another chance, he might be the best name out there.

John Farrell: The former Toronto Blue Jays and Boston Red Sox manager, who won a World Series in 2013 with Boston, joined the Reds in March as a scout.

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