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Did you know Dayton has its very own beef jerky store? Meet the ‘No Name Cowboy’

Published: Friday, March 02, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Did you know Dayton has its very own beef jerky store?

No, Dave “No Name Cowboy” Buehrle cannot dance. Nope, no way. 

What the Clint Eastwood-loving, proud member of Single Action Shooting Society can do is make beef jerky.
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With the encouragement of his late wife Mary, Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy Artisan Beef Jerky in October 2010. 

“She loved me, she loved the jerky,” Buehrle, who is also known as “Jerky Dave,” said of his beloved. 

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A print taken from a painting of the couple in western garb hangs in the small shop, which is decorated with posters of cowboy movies, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Second Amendment. 

Buehrle points out that he liked Eastwood a lot more before  the actor divorced his wife.

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With a sign out front that reads “Beef Jerky,” the store at 549 Miamisburg-Centerville Road in Washington Township’s Normandy Square Shopping Center is hard to miss. 

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Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

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Buehrle said it has been his refuge since his wife died in June 2013. 

“(Her death) took the wind out of my sails,” he said. 

The couple had been together since 2006, but were married just six months when Mary died following a fight with lung cancer. 

An University of Dayton graduate and state licensed electrician for more than 40 years, Buehrle’s arsenal of beef jerky includes 15 flavors.

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They are all his own recipe and range from the mildly-flavored original to the Ghost of Boot Hill, a ghost and habanero pepper jerky that earned six bullets on Buehrle’s heat scale. 

“I can send fire out of your eyeballs,” the Dayton native, now a Clearcreek Twp. resident, said. “I’ve got a great company. I am proud of it.”

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Dill pickle and teriyaki are also popular flavors sold in the shop. 

Buehrle cuts choice top round beef using 8-inch butcher knives. The meat is marinated and dried.  

“I am knife-cutting fool,” said Buehrle, who started making his own jerky in 1989 or 1990. 

His jerky contains no chemicals or preservatives. Cured with sugars and salts, it can last up to a year. 

Dog treats are also available. 

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Christmas and Valentine’s Day are Buehrle’s busiest times of year. 

“(For Valentine’s Day), there is a parade of pretty women coming in trying to curry favor with their husbands and boyfriends and partners,” he said. 

Vegetarians are probably the only kind of customers Buehrle says he doesn’t get in the shop. 

“I get doctors. I get construction workers,” the former rock musician said. “It’s a neat place to work. You’ll be surprise how many people love jerky.”

Want to try it?

WHAT: No Name Cowboy Artisan Beef Jerky

WHERE: 549 Miamisburg-Centerville Road, Washington Twp., Montgomery County

HOURS: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday 

INFO: 937-478-5032 | Website | Facebook

PRICING: A pound of beef jerky is $43. Two ounces sell for $7.50. Prices are subject to change. 

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

Dave "No Name Cowboy" Buehrle opened No Name Cowboy beef jerky store in 2011 with his late wife, Mary. The Washington Twp. store is decorated in posters of cowboy movies, The Second Amendment and the Declaration of Independence. A print hang on the wall of Dave and Mary in western wear.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

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New Father’s Day Beer, Bourbon and Brunch event targets Dayton dads who like to eat AND drink

Published: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 @ 1:38 PM

Holiday Inn at 2800 Presidential Dr. in Fairborn  will host a brand new Father’s Day Beer, Bourbon and Brunch.
Holiday Inn
Holiday Inn at 2800 Presidential Dr. in Fairborn will host a brand new Father’s Day Beer, Bourbon and Brunch.(Holiday Inn)

How  does a little BBB sound to celebrate your padre?

Justin White, the executive chef of The Wright Place and the Holiday Inn at 2800 Presidential Drive in Fairborn, is hosting a brand new Father’s Day Beer, Bourbon and Brunch at the hotel Sunday, June 17. 

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There will be seatings at noon and 2 p.m. 

“We’re honoring dad with a special celebration highlighted by a few of his favorite things,” White said in a release. “Featuring bourbon-infused foods and drinks, local craft beer, live music and baseball, we have something for everyone in the family — but especially for dads.”

THE COST 

Holiday Inn at 2800 Presidential Dr. in Fairborn will host a brand new Father’s Day Beer, Bourbon and Brunch.(Holiday Inn)

The brunch is $31 per adult. The cost is $24 for seniors and military personnel and $13 for children. 

Children age 5 and younger will be admitted free of charge. 

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THE BOURBON AND BEER 

Holiday Inn at 2800 Presidential Dr. in Fairborn will host a brand new Father’s Day Beer, Bourbon and Brunch.(Holiday Inn)

Adults will receive a pint of Yuengling as part of the brunch. Brew from Warped Wing and Lock 27 will be available for purchase.

There will also be several hand-crafted cocktails using Stillwrights Bourbon, produced from the nearby Bath Twp. distillery Flat Rock Spirits. 

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THE  BRUNCH 

The meal includes bourbon-glazed ribs, mac and beer cheese, assorted smoked sausages and brats cooked in beer, Lemon Shandy-grilled bone-in chicken, bourbon baked beans, brisket sliders, salmon patties with cornbread stuffing and jalapenos, grilled corn on the cob with lime-Parmesan butter, and pecan bourbon pie.

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BONUS

The hotel will raffle off Cincinnati Reds and Dragons baseball tickets during the day. Each adult will be entered to win. 

RESERVATIONS

Call (937) 431-4631.

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A new juicery is opening today in Dayton and its owners hope it will be first step in revitalizing neighborhood

Published: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Located at a once abandoned shop at 1912 N Main St. in Dayton, The Santa Clara Juicery will be the first brick and mortar juice bar to open in Dayton. It will offer cold pressed raw juice made from organic produce. Each sale will benefit the Santa Clara community.
Alex Perry
Located at a once abandoned shop at 1912 N Main St. in Dayton, The Santa Clara Juicery will be the first brick and mortar juice bar to open in Dayton. It will offer cold pressed raw juice made from organic produce. Each sale will benefit the Santa Clara community.(Alex Perry)

UPDATE: Santa Clara Juicery has pushed back its opening date by a week. The new opening date is June 16.

>>PHOTOS: See the transformation of The Santa Clara Juicery
Known for being trendy, healthy and tasty, raw juice bars have popped up all over the United States. 

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The fruit and vegetable juice market will be worth a sizable $257.17 billion by 2025, according to Grand View Research, Inc.

So it’s no surprise this trend has hit Dayton, but what may be surprising is the rest of the story behind Dayton’s newest raw juice bar, The Santa Clara Juicery.

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Owned and operated by husband and wife Elizabeth and Dave Furst, The Santa Clara Juicery is the first step to what the duo hopes to be a revitalization of the Santa Clara neighborhood. Elizabeth grew up in the neighborhood, often helping her parents with their business, Evans Electric, after school. 

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“Everyone pretty much pulled out except for my parents and an insurance broker at the end (of the street) who eventually had to pull out due to health issues.” said Elizabeth Furst. “This block is really only going to get redone by us.”

Santa Clara is one of Dayton’s 65 neighborhoods. Though the small district is No. 36 on a list of total population, the district ranks sixth for population density per square mile (listed at No. 6 on that list). The average annual income is approximately $21K per year, about half of the average annual income for Montgomery County at $43K.

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Located at a once abandoned shop at 1912 N Main St. in Dayton, The Santa Clara Juicery will be the first brick and mortar juice bar to open in Dayton. It will offer cold pressed raw juice made from organic produce. Each sale will benefit the Santa Clara community.(Alex Perry)

BIGGER GOALS

The neighborhood has faced its share of challenges from crime to low income. The business owners hope to see positive growth starting with service.

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The Fursts hosted a clean-up day this month, which shot some adrenaline to the heart of their mission.

“We had both housing associations from the area come together for a clean-up day, and both were very excited for what is happening here.”

This type of active and engaged service is exactly what the juicery hopes to bring to the area. 

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“We’d really like to become a health district. Some of the other things we’d like to see here are a gym, a bike shop, possibly a pop-up clinic or urgent care. We’ve talked about transforming a former dance studio back. People have asked us about that a lot because they have nothing like that in this area.”

The couple is also working with a grocery chain, bike engineer and others in hopes of bringing in mobile or pop-up style services to the area. A few other ideas on the wish list include a backyard patio, brewpub and creating an attraction to bring people to the area and create a new economy.

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“I’ll be meeting with the Director of Economic Development in Dayton to help determine how what we’re doing here can effect the economy in Dayton overall. In 5 to 10 years, we’re expecting to see the growth of Dayton trickle to the North — and we’re active in asking what can we do now so that when traffic starts pushing, there’s a reason to come  here.”

Located at a once abandoned shop at 1912 N Main St. in Dayton, The Santa Clara Juicery will be the first brick and mortar juice bar to open in Dayton. It will offer cold pressed raw juice made from organic produce. Each sale will benefit the Santa Clara community.(Alex Perry)

FOOD DESERT

Dayton ranked as one of the worst metropolitan areas in the U.S. for food hardship in 2015, according to the Food Research & Action Center. The city ranked 11th out of the 109 metropolitan statistical areas represented in Gallup data for “households who indicated they experienced food hardship.”

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A 2016 report named Dayton-area ninth in the nation for food hardship. 

In Santa Clara, nearly 60 percent of its residents are single mothers and 584 of the neighborhood’s 1,632 residents are 18 years old or younger.

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“This area is in a food desert. In this particular neighborhood, one-third of the families don’t have vehicles and more than one-third can’t afford to put a meal on the table more than once a day,” said Dave Furst. “In order to get food, the only way they can get food is to hitch a ride, or settle for something they can find at Dollar General. There’s nowhere to go; you can’t walk to get food.”

“The other day, a family walked behind the shop, and we’re grilling hot dogs. The family had a 2-year old and a 4-year old. We asked if they wanted something to eat. Come to find out, they’re on their way to CSL plasma to sell enough to get a bus fare so they can go sell their kid’s clothes so they can get a meal for the night. And that’s all over here. You should’ve seen these kids’ faces light up when I brought them groceries. They didn’t even know how to react to bananas.”

For residents in this neighborhood, The People’s Market sells food, but more convenience-style options and rarely stocks fresh produce. There’s also a Family Dollar nearby, offering similar edible options.

A short drive away, a new market is in the works. The Gem City Market will be built on the 300 and 400 block of Salem Ave., bringing a full-service grocery store to one of the largest food deserts in the state. It will be Dayton’s first worker and community-owned co-operative grocery store. The goal is to open by the end of 2019.

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Located at a once abandoned shop at 1912 N Main St. in Dayton, The Santa Clara Juicery will be the first brick and mortar juice bar to open in Dayton. It will offer cold pressed raw juice made from organic produce. Each sale will benefit the Santa Clara community.(Alex Perry)

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP

The Fursts aren’t the first to work to take action in the neighborhood.

“We know of a non-profit that’s also looking to bring a job placement/residency building at the corner of North Main and Santa Clara to help people that are emancipated from the foster care system so that they can have a job right away and a place to live.”

Children and teens aren’t the only ones suffering from lack of opportunity or resources in the area.

“We want to use this and other businesses to employ people in this area. A lot of people have criminal backgrounds and can’t get jobs. So want to be able to help give them a job.”

“We have a lot of friends who live in this area who are nurses. Now that Good Sam has shut down, Grandview has scooped up a lot of local nurses. We’ve been working with Grandview to do some cross promotion. This is a food desert, so we’re the only healthy option. We’re going to cross-promote health screenings, educational community nights. The nurses are excited, because their only coffee options are Brown St. and Wayne Ave., so we’ll be way more convenient for them,” said Elizabeth Furst.

In effort to provide more healthy options to the community, the Fursts are also working on becoming a location for food banks and harvest box pickups. The idea is to combine education, options and resources for this community, which so desperately needs it. 

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“We’ve talked to the city, planners and developers, and we all agree — things can only go up.”

Currently, the Fursts are working to complete the construction and development of the interior of the shop. Elizabeth is actively working to source as many local organic fruits and vegetables as possible to use in the juice recipes. Some of the produce will be imported from the south and California. 

You can follow their Facebook page for additional details. A portion of profits from juice sales will be returned to the Santa Clara district through investment, community action and programs. 

>> PHOTOS: See inside Dayton’s newest craft brewery 

Want to go?

WHAT: The Santa Clara Juicery

WHERE: 1912 N. Main St., Dayton

INFO: FacebookWebsite

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Where to find the best meat for grilling around Dayton

Published: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 @ 11:20 AM
Updated: Thursday, June 14, 2018 @ 3:52 PM

Tips for Safe Grilling

Summer is in full swing, so fire up that grill.

Here is a guide to some of the best meat you’ll find in the Dayton-area to hit those flames.

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Beloved downtown shop’s new owner is keeping the ‘sass’

Published: Wednesday, May 02, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

We take a look into inside of Agnes and Orson which is now under new ownership.

The new owner of a much-beloved downtown business says she is keeping the “sass” the store has been known to carry in abundance.

Sandy Van Fleet said she bought Agnes & Orson from three co-owners of Square One Salon and Spa because she liked that sass and nearly everything else about the store at located at 514 E. Third St. 

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It was a fast romance. 

Van Fleet, a former stay-at-home mom and community volunteer, started working at the shop in December. 

She bought it in February. 

“(Co-owner Josh Stucky) told me they were thinking about it, and I said ‘hmmmmm,’” Van Fleet recalled. 

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The stars aligned.

Van Fleet had spent about a decade thinking about opening her own store.  

“It just seemed fun. I love downtown. I love the vibe in here (Agnes & Orson),” she said. “It’s what I like. It is why I wanted to work here. There are nice gifts for just about anybody, including your dog. There are candles and sassy cards.”

Van Fleet has made only a handful of changes since buying the business Stucky, Misty Wells and Canaan Good opened in 2015 at 1132 Brown St. 

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Citing the need for more room due to the shop’s growth, the trio moved the store to its current location in early 2017.  

>> Agnes & Orson relocating downtown  (Jan 4, 2017)

Over time, Wells said running the store became too time consuming. 

“We needed quality of life again,” she said. “We had so many things going on in our lives that we could not devote the time that the store needed.”

Wells said she and Good were stretched working on the store and Square One. Stucky is involved in numerous community boards and organizations. 

“It opened our eyes to a lot of new things,” she said of running a retail store. “It is a baby that needs to be nurtured.”

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With her two adults now out of the house, Van Fleet said she has time to devote to Agnes & Orson. 

The shop carries several locally produced items including jewelry, artwork, Lindy’s Bakery dog treats and well as items that promote inclusion of people from the LGBT community such as whimsical T-shirts, glasses and mugs. 

“It’s a fun shop. It has a lot of stuff. It is always changing,” she said.

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Sandy Van Fleet bought Agnes & Orson from three co-owners of Square One Salon and Spa in February.(Photo: Amelia Robinson)

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