Oops! Boy trips at museum, punches hole in painting worth $1.5 million

Published: Tuesday, August 25, 2015 @ 8:05 AM
Updated: Tuesday, August 25, 2015 @ 8:05 AM

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Whoops! A 12-year-old boy visiting a Taiwan museum took a tumble ... and ended up destroying a $1.5 million work of art.

The boy was at the museum in Taipei on a guided tour when security footage captured him tripping right in front of the Paolo Porpora oil painting titled "Flowers," which is 350 years old. He tries to keep himself from falling over and ends up smashing a fist-sized hole in the painting, valued at $1.5 million.

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The painting was on loan as part of the "The Face of Leonardo, Images of a Genius" exhibition, Mashable reports.

Lucky for the clumsy lad, he won't have to pay for the damages. According to Focus Taiwan News, insurance will cover the cost to have the painting restored before it is sent back to Italy.

>> Click here to watch the video

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Medieval grave included coffin birth, early neurosurgery

Published: Thursday, April 26, 2018 @ 2:39 PM

FILE PHOTO (elianemey/Pixabay license: https://pixabay.com/en/service/terms/#usage)
elianemey/Pixabay
FILE PHOTO (elianemey/Pixabay license: https://pixabay.com/en/service/terms/#usage)(elianemey/Pixabay)

Researchers have made a rare discovery - a medieval woman who died while pregnant who also had  early form of neurosurgery, as well as,  a coffin birth.

A young woman, who experts believe was between the ages of 25 and 35 years old, had a surgery called trepanation and they think it was done only a week before she died sometime in the seventh or eighth century. Trepanation is when a hole is drilled into the skull of a living person. If it was not drilled, the hole was scrapped in the skull. Either way, the hole would be used to treat pain due to trauma or neurological disease, the BBC reported.

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Skulls with trepanation holes have been found all over the world, the BBC reported.

The woman was 38 weeks pregnant when she died, CNN reported.

Researchers found the bones of a fetus along with the woman’s remains in the brick coffin.

They say the baby was a coffin birth or a rare occurrence when the gases that build up during decomposition expel the baby.

Researchers say to find both the coffin birth and the trepanation, especially trepanation during the European early middle ages, in one person’s remains is extremely rare, CNN reported

The study concerning the woman’s remains, which were discovered in 2010, was recently published in the journal for World Neurology.

Doctors don’t know why she had the brain procedure, but speculate that she may have had pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, and that it was used to relieve pressure she had in her head. Bone healing around the hole in her skull shows that she lived about a week after she had the procedure, CNN reported.

The woman, doctors said, was in good health, but she may have had an illness that wouldn’t be reflected in her skeleton. They also are not sure if the baby would have been able to be born alive, but it was late in the pregnancy, as the baby was about 38 weeks, CNN reported.

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WATCH: Cowboy hero takes down armed robber

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 12:28 PM

WATCH: Cowboy hero takes down armed robber

A dramatic tackle of an armed robber was caught on CCTV in Monterrey, northern Mexico on Monday, April 23.

A store customer wearing a cowboy hat can be seen removing his glasses and tackling a young man who enters the store pointing a gun at employees. 

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The armed robber turned toward a second employee a few seconds after entering the store, which is when the customer seized the opportunity to attack the robber, whose weapon drops to the floor.

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‘Angry badger’ forces doors to close at 500-year-old castle tunnel, tourist spot

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 10:59 AM

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FILE PHOTO (ImBooToo/Morguefile license: https://morguefile.com/license)(ImBooToo/Morguefile)

A castle in Scotland has lasted for 500 years but the property is apparently no match for an angry badger. Yes, you’ve read that right. An angry badger shut down tourist access to a tunnel at Craignethan Castle, the BBC reported.  

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Officials allowed the public access to the rest of the 5-century-old building but the tunnel was closed not only for people’s safety, but also for the badger’s, officials told the BBC.

The badger apparently did some damage to the masonry of the castle before it left the building either Friday night or Saturday morning on its own accord.

The animal left after castle staff members tried cat food and honey to coax it out, the Guardian reported.

Castle staff members who run the property’s Twitter account had a little online fun, posting a GIF image of dancing badgers when they announced the tunnel’s closing.

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WATCH: Polar bear cub takes first steps outside zoo

Published: Saturday, April 14, 2018 @ 2:56 PM

Polar bear cub takes first steps outside zoo

A 18-week-old polar bear cub left the birthing box at Gelsenkirchen's zoological garden for the first time together with his mother on Friday, April 13.

The cub was born on Dec. 4, 2017 and now weighs about 20 kilograms (44 pounds.) 

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Gelsenkirchen Mayor Frank Baranowski unveiled the name of the little polar bear. Five proposals were up for election for almost two weeks: Nanook, Mathilda, Lenja, Lore and Baerbel. 

Most polar bear fans voted for Nanook, the animal keepers' proposal, on the zoo's website homepage. Nanook comes from the Inuit language and means polar bear.

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