Daughter to police: Family may have been part of arson that killed Hamilton firefighter

Published: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 @ 4:35 PM
Updated: Thursday, November 09, 2017 @ 12:22 PM

Day 2 of testimony in Hamilton Arson Trial

The older daughter of a man on trial for the murder of a Hamilton firefighter testified Wednesday that she is a recovering addict who, while in jail, told police that her family may have been involved in the deadly arson.

MORE: Daughter of man on trial in Hamilton firefighter death testifies about missing items

Melissa Lainhart-Jones is the older daughter of Lester Parker. Parker 67, and his nephew, William “Billy” Tucker, 46, are both charged with arson and murder in the fire at Parker’s Pater Avenue home that killed firefighter Patrick Wolterman on Dec. 28, 2015.

Lainhart-Jones took the stand Wednesday and testified she was an addict in the fall of 2015 and stole pills from her father’s home. She is now a recovering addict, she said.

For the past four weeks leading up to the trial, she has been housed at a hotel paid for by the city of Hamilton, she said.

Lainhart-Jones said she awoke about 4:30 a.m. Dec. 28, 2015, to see a a television screen with her family home in flames. She went to the scene and called her father, who was in Las Vegas with her mother.

From Las Vegas, Lainhart-Jones said Parker told her to “get my (expletive) out of there. Someone is going to pay dearly for that one.”

MORE: Prosecutor: Hamilton man planned to burn home for insurance money

In April 2016, Lainhart-Jones said she was in the Butler County Jail for a probation violation. Paramedics at the jail had treated her for illness and they talked about the death of Patrick Wolterman, she said.

When her father came to visit her in jail, Lainhart-Jones said she told him about the conversation.

“He (Parker) put his head down. He said, ‘tell them that I did not mean for that to happen,’ ” Lainhart-Jones said.

MORE: Owners of home where Hamilton firefighter died refused to discuss insurance claim 

During cross examination by defense attorneys for Parker and Tucker, Lainhart-Jones said she told detectives Tucker as well as another cousin may have been involved in the arson.

Since the fire, Lainhart-Jones said she has received $1,200 in payments from police for information about that fire and to pay her phone bill.

During her testimony, defense attorneys hammered home the fact that there is a monetary reward for information about the deadly arson.

“But I was telling them (police) before money was involved,” Lainhart-Jones said.

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Warmer temperatures return next week

Published: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 5:36 AM
Updated: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 10:33 PM

Warmer temperatures return this week in the Dayton area.

Lingering clouds will make for a breezy day, but warmer temperatures will return next week, said Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Brett Collar. 

>>Dayton Air Show forecast

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST:

  • Stray shower this evening
  • Slight chance for rain Sunday
  • Warmer temperatures next week

>>WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

5 Day Forecast with Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs

Tonight: A few more breaks in the clouds are expected overnight. Temperatures will drop into the middle 60s.

>>LISTEN: Dayton Air Show Chance of Podcast

Sunday: It’ll be a touch warmer as most of us get in the lower 80s. Partly cloudy skies are expected and while most will stay dry, a stray shower or storms cannot be ruled out.

Monday: Mostly sunny skies are expected. Highs will be in the lower 80s.

Tuesday: A dry start is expected with highs in the middle 80s. The chance for rain returns in the evening.

>>Moon and Jupiter close this weekend

Wednesday: A few showers are likely, maybe a few storms as well. Highs will be in the middle 80s.

Thursday: A hot day is expected with partly cloudy skies. Highs will be in the upper 80s.

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Marriage may lower risk of heart attack, stroke, study suggests

Published: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 9:49 PM



Pixabay
(Pixabay)

Single, divorced and widowed individuals may have a higher risk of developing heart disease, stroke and associated risks of death compared to married individuals.

>> Read more trending news 

That’s according to new research published this week in the journal Heart, for which scientists trawled research databases to understand how marital status may influence risk of cardiovascular disease.

Their pooled analysis included 34 studies (1963 to 2015), the largest study to date on the subject, and involved more than 2 million people aged between 42-77 from multiple regions of the globe, including from North America, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Scandinavia.

>> Related: Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

Compared to married individuals, those who were never married, or are divorced/widowed, had a 42 percent higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease and 16 percent higher risk of developing coronary artery heart disease.

Those who had never been married had a heightened risk of dying from both heart disease (42 percent) and stroke (55 percent).

>> Related: You may be able to better avoid heart attacks with this common snack, study says

Divorce was associated with a 35 percent higher risk of developing heart disease for both men and women.

And widowed individuals were 16 percent more likely than married men or women to have a stroke, likely a result of stress-related theory, which suggests that losing a partner may have a negative impact on the emotional, behavioral and economic well-being of an individual.

>> Related: Got heart disease? You may have a better chance of survival if married

Researchers reported no difference in the risk of death following a stroke between married and unmarried individuals. However, risk of death after a heart attack was significantly higher (42 percent) among those who had never married.

“Social causation theory suggests that individuals benefit from spousal support,” study authors wrote. “For example, living with another person allows earlier recognition and response to warning symptoms, especially if a myocardial infarction becomes instantly disabling.”

>> Related: Women less likely than men to get CPR from bystanders - and more likely to die - study suggests

Studies have shown that unmarried patients had longer delays when seeking help, authors wrote in the report. These individuals are also twice as likely not to take prescribed medications, the strongest predictor of better outcomes.

Furthermore, greater financial resources from homes with dual incomes make quality healthcare more accessible.

The researchers note that there was no information on same sex partnerships or marriage quality in their report. The meta-analysis didn’t explore unmarried individuals living with someone, either.

>> Related: Do heart stents even work? New study finds they fail to ease chest pain

Future work, the authors suggest, should focus on whether being married is a “surrogate marker” of other health conditions or whether marital status should be considered a risk factor alone.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately 610,000 people die of heart disease in the country every year–that's 1 in every 4 deaths.

>> Related: Common painkillers increase risk of heart attack by one-third, new study finds

More than 350,000 Americans who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease suffer a cardiac arrest each year in areas other than a hospital. And about 90 percent of them die.

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Bicyclist killed in Middletown accident identified

Published: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 3:54 PM
Updated: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 10:08 PM

Middletown ped strike

A bicyclist is dead after being struck by a vehicle Saturday afternoon near Middletown’s Sunset Park.

Paul G. Klein, 66, of Middletown was killed after he failed to stop at a stop sign around 2:20 p.m. as he was traveling east on Fisher Avenue and was struck by a 2017 Jeep Cherokee, according to police.

Klein was struck by the Maroon colored Jeep Cherokee driven by Sharma Finley, 66, of Middletown, who was traveling southbound on Sunset Street approaching the intersection with Fisher Avenue, police said.

Middletown Police and EMS arrived on scene and pronounced Klein dead. Ohio State Highway Patrol Troopers arrived on scene for the crash investigation.

Finley was not injured in the crash.

Klein was wearing protective equipment at the time of the crash. Alcohol and drugs are not suspected to be factors in the crash.

The crash remains under investigation by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

"It's really a shame cause you wouldn't expect something out here. It's a nice residential area," said Middletown resident Jeremy Reins--who lives up the hill from where the accident happened. "It's sad to hear. It's just people need to try and share this road a bit more, we need to look out for each other if we're driving."

A 66-year-old, male bicyclist is dead after being struck by a vehicle near Middletown’s Sunset Park, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.(Staff Writer)

MORE: ‘Your heart just swells’: These 10 Butler County foster kids have defied the odds

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Senior citizens earn thousands by sharing their homes, says Airbnb

Published: Saturday, June 23, 2018 @ 3:50 PM

Senior citizens across the U.S. are earning an extra $7,000 per year on average by opening up their homes on Airbnb.
Michael Steele
Senior citizens across the U.S. are earning an extra $7,000 per year on average by opening up their homes on Airbnb.(Michael Steele)

Thousands of senior citizens across the United States are finding a profitable side hustle --- opening up their homes to strangers on Airbnb.

Nearly 78,000 seniors (ages 60 and up) across the U.S. shared their homes on Airbnb in 2017 -- accounting for $700 million in earnings, the company reports.

The typical host earned an extra $7,000 in income a year -- a positive boost for people living on fixed incomes.

>> Read more trending news 

Airbnb is a website that allows people to open up their homes for vacation rentals or short-term leasing. There are over 5 million homes listed on Airbnb in over 81,000 cities.

According to Airbnb’s annual survey, 41 percent of seniors reported that hosting their home has helped them afford to stay in their homes -- places they’ve often lived most of their lives. 

Airbnb states that 45 percent of senior hosts rely on that extra income to make ends meet and spend it on important costs of living. 

Senior hosts are beloved on Airbnb, the company said.

88 percent of trips hosted by seniors last year resulted in 5-star reviews.

Percentage of active listings with senior Airbnb hosts 

New Mexico34%
Maine32%
Vermont28%
Hawaii26%
Delaware26%

 

Typical host earnings for seniors by state 

Hawaii$14,000
California$11,700
Washington, D.C.$10,500
Washington$8,700
Rhode Island$8,500

Percentage of senior host reviews with 5-stars 

Nebraska93%
North Dakota93%
Kansas93%
South Dakota92%
Indiana91%

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