Wilberforce U. president takes job at Texas college

Published: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 @ 4:31 PM


            Wilberforce University president Herman Felton has taken a job in Texas.
Wilberforce University president Herman Felton has taken a job in Texas.

Wilberforce University president Herman Felton has taken a job at another historically black college.

Felton will become the 17th president of Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, according to HBCU Digest. He will replace the college’s current president, Haywood Strickland, in June.

RELATED: Pinkard tapped to be next Wilberforce U. president

“It is an honor and privilege to be a part of the rich legacy of Wiley College,” Felton said in a statement to HBCU Digest. “I look forward to working with Wiley trustees, faculty, staff, students, alumni and supporters to prepare the next generation of servant-leaders.”

The news of Felton’s new job comes just a day after Wilberforce University appointed Executive Vice President and Provost Elfred Anthony Pinkard to be the university’s 22nd president.

Felton served as Wilberforce’s 21st president for just over a year-and-a-half. Wilberforce University has struggled financially in the past few years and Felton sought to stabilize the school.

In November 2016, the university cut $750,000 from its payroll budget and further layoffs, furloughs and pay cuts were implemented in May, Felton said at the time.

RELATED: Wilberforce U. announces layoffs, pay cuts and furloughs for employees

Earlier this year school leaders put about 10 acres of campus, including two buildings, up for sale for about $7 million.

From mid-2014 through most of 2015, Wilberforce University was at risk of losing its accreditation from mid-2014 through most of 2015, due to declining enrollment.

The school was issued a “show cause” order from the Higher Learning Commission that was later lifted in November 2015 after enrollment increased by more than 85 percent to around 650 students. If the college had lost its accreditation, its students would not be eligible for federal financial aid.

RELATED: Wilberforce University puts part of campus up for sale

Before starting at Wilberforce University in 2016, Felton worked at Livingstone College in North Carolina, where he served as senior vice president, COO and vice president of institutional advancement.

He was credited with increasing Livingstone’s annual alumni contributions from seven percent to 19 percent over three years, according to a press release from Wilberforce. He previously worked as the director of development at Murray State University in Kentucky.

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Police: Hidden camera filmed Starbucks customers in bathroom

Published: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 @ 10:41 PM

Hidden Camera Reportedly Found in Starbucks Bathroom

Police in an Atlanta suburb are investigating after a woman discovered a hidden camera in a bathroom stall at a Starbucks in North Fulton County .

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Officers with the Alpharetta Department of Public Safety confiscated the camera and detectives are now looking into the case.

According to the police report, the camera had about 25 videos stored on it, and “several” of those videos showed people using the restroom.

25-year-old woman discovered the camera around 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, police said. The camera was taped under the baby changing station in the women’s bathroom.

>> Related: Starbucks closing over 8,000 stores for racial-bias training after controversial arrest

“We were quite concerned to learn this and are grateful to our customers and partners who took action to involve local authorities,” a spokesperson for Starbucks wrote in an email. “We will continue to support them in any way we can.”

Police said the woman removed the camera and notified the manager on-duty. According to the police report, the woman gave the camera to the manager who said he would notify Starbucks’ corporate office, but she pushed him to call 911.

Police arrived after the manager filed a report with the corporate office. The manager gave police the camera, its battery pack and a USB cord. Police then reviewed the camera and found the videos.

No suspects have yet been identified, but the person responsible for the camera would at least face the charge of eavesdropping, which is a felony, police said.

>> Related: Starbucks CEO meets with 2 black men arrested in Philadelphia store

This incident comes as the company is facing backlash after two black men were arrested at one of its locations in Philadelphia last week. The company plans to close 8,000  stores for a day next month for company-wide racial bias training.

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Rain/snow mix this morning; temps drop below freezing tonight

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 3:21 AM
Updated: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 3:38 AM

Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini looks at the latest temperatures and if we stay dry this weekend.

Another area of light showers, falling as a rain/snow mix, will shift southeast through the morning, said Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini.

Freeze Warning will go into effect at 2 a.m. Friday for Montgomery, Greene, Warren, Preble and Butler Counties.

>> Live Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Passing rain/snow showers early
  • Dry weather returns 
  • Slow warm-up through weekend

DETAILED FORECAST

Today: Road temperatures are warm, so the rain/snow mix is not expected to cause widespread slick spots. Snow may try to stick to elevated surfaces briefly. Highs will return to the upper 40s with clouds breaking for sun in the afternoon. It will be breezy and still cool. It will be mostly clear tonight. Temperatures will drop below freezing, so any outdoor vegetation will need protection.

WHIO Weather App

Friday: Temperatures will be below freezing, making for a chilly morning. There will be plenty of sunshine through the afternoon and temperatures will finally get closer to normal, reaching the upper 50s.

Saturday: Skies will be sunny with highs around 60, making for a beautiful start to the weekend.

Sunday: It will be another nice day with highs in the low 60s, which is back to normal. We’ll see sunshine through the afternoon.

>> County-by-County Weather 

Monday: The dry stretch continues. Highs will reach the mid-60s with sunshine and a few clouds.

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Kettering teen murder suspect in court today as trial nears

Published: Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 7:09 AM


            The case against Kylen Gregory is scheduled to be back in court today. NICK BLIZZARD/STAFF
The case against Kylen Gregory is scheduled to be back in court today. NICK BLIZZARD/STAFF

A Kettering teen accused of murdering a Fairmont High School student in 2016 is set to return to court today after a judge said most evidence questioned by his attorneys can be part of the trial.

A hearing in advance of the May 7 trial of Kylen Gregory, who turned 18 last month, is scheduled this afternoon before Montgomery County Common Pleas Court Judge Dennis Langer.

RELATED: Trial of Kettering teen set for May

Langer recently ruled much of the evidence collected after the deadly shooting of Ronnie Bowers Sept. 4, 2016, will be admissible. He ruled a warrant for telephone records of two of Gregory’s relatives “failed to provide probable cause” for that evidence to be used in the case.

Gregory was 16 years old when the shooting occurred on Willowdale Avenue, and he is being tried as an adult on two counts of murder and related charges.

RELATED: Judges’ rulings touch on Sixth, First Amendment issues

Authorities and witnesses have said Gregory fatally shot the 16-year-old Bowers while the victim attempted to drive away from a confrontation.

Bowers died two days later - just after hours after Gregory and two other teens were initially charged in juvenile court – in what was ruled Kettering’s first gun-related homicide since 2007.

-MORE COVERAGE ON THIS ISSUE:

RELATED: Ruling allows victim’s remains in court before trial

RELATED: Judge restricts media access in Kettering homicide case

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Night owls have 10 percent higher mortality risk, study suggests

Published: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 @ 5:14 PM

A new study finds night owls are at a slightly higher risk for premature death because they might not get enough sleep. Night owls in the study were also more likely to have neurological disorders, psychological disorders, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders and respiratory disorders.
Pixabay
A new study finds night owls are at a slightly higher risk for premature death because they might not get enough sleep. Night owls in the study were also more likely to have neurological disorders, psychological disorders, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders and respiratory disorders.(Pixabay)

Some people are easily in bed by 10 p.m. each night. Others struggle to fall asleep before 2 or 3 a.m. Sleep researchers refer to this as an individual's chronotype. And while we generally attribute this to preference or genetics, new research suggests there may be serious health implications involved for those late sleepers.

>> Read more trending news  

The research, conducted by scientists at Northwestern University and the University of Surrey, tracked 433,268 men and women in the United Kingdom over a six and a half year period of time. Analysis of the data revealed that participants who identified as "definite evening types" at the start of the study had a 10 percent increased risk of mortality from all causes when compared to "definite morning types. The findings were published in the journal Chronobiology International this month.

>> Related: This is why your brain feels all foggy when you’re sleep deprived

"What we think might be happening is, there's a problem for the night owl who's trying to live in the morning lark world," Dr. Kristen Knutson, associate professor of neurology at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine and a lead author of the study, told CNN. "This mismatch between their internal clock and their external world could lead to problems for their health over the long run, especially if their schedule is irregular."

>> Related: Want better sleep? Write a to-do list, study says

In addition to a slightly higher risk of premature death, night owls in the study were also more likely to have neurological disorders, psychological disorders, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders and respiratory disorders, Knutson said.

But other sleep experts suggest the data shouldn't cause late sleepers to panic just yet.

"The results are provocative, but they can tell us very little about why the mortality rate is higher in night owls. The study is not experimental and does not show what benefits, if any, might occur by changing one's schedule," Dr. Donald L. Bliwise, director of the program in sleep, aging and chronobiology at Emory University School of Medicine, told the AJC.

>> Related: Have trouble sleeping? Research says that may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s

Bliwise also suggested that knowing the participants’ actual bedtimes, instead of a simple self-definition, would help researchers understand the data better. 

"One person's concept of a late bedtime or early wake-up time may not be identical to another's," Bliwise said. "About 10 percent of the study population could not even answer the question, and the proportion with the highest mortality risk (those endorsing a definite evening type) was even smaller than this."

It's also unclear whether the participants' sleep patterns changed throughout the duration of the study.

"I am not sure that there is anything that night owls should do to change their sleep patterns on this basis of these observational data," Bliwise said.

 >> Related: Trying to beat those sugar cravings? Go to sleep, says a new study

Substantial scientific evidence suggests that the times when an individual goes to sleep and wakes up are strongly influenced by genetics, he added. Environmental factors, such as a job or school, affect these decisions, but people can't simply change their genetic predisposition to fit a particular schedule.

"Speaking solely on the basis of this evidence, it would be premature to force change on what may otherwise be an innate tendency to go to bed late and sleep late," Bliwise said. "If that schedule leads to chronically and sustained short sleep durations, then that might be worthy of attention."

While the study looked at a very large sample, and attempted to control for other risk factors, it merely showed a small correlation between sleeping late and a higher mortality rate. The fact that a participant's chronotype was determined by self-reporting is one of the biggest weaknesses of the study, according to the researchers. 

>> Related: 5 easy ways to improve your sleep 

At the same time, Knutson believes the results are enough to suggest that night owls should focus more on their health. 

"An important message here is for night owls to realize that they have these potential health problems and therefore need to be more vigilant about maintaining a healthy lifestyle," she said, adding that exercising, eating right and getting adequate sleep may be particularly important to night owls.

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