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White vans mark beginning of property reappraisal work

Published: Tuesday, March 06, 2018 @ 3:47 PM
Updated: Wednesday, March 07, 2018 @ 8:35 AM


            Greene County residents may see people taking pictures of their homes while sitting in white vans in the coming weeks. The activity is part of the county’s reappraisal process that will be finished in 2020. Look for the emblem on the side of the van that says “Greene County Auditor Imaging & Address Verification Project 937-562-5065. (Contributed)
Greene County residents may see people taking pictures of their homes while sitting in white vans in the coming weeks. The activity is part of the county’s reappraisal process that will be finished in 2020. Look for the emblem on the side of the van that says “Greene County Auditor Imaging & Address Verification Project 937-562-5065. (Contributed)

Over the next several weeks, residents in Greene County may see white vans parked on their streets with people inside taking photos of homes.

The photographers are employees of Tyler Technologies, Inc., which was awarded the $1.5 million contract for property reappraisals through the county auditor’s office. The white vans are expected to be traveling throughout the county for the next eight to 12 weeks.

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The six-year cycle for property reappraisals in Greene County is not due until 2020, but the process of collecting images, data and other information begins early to cover the county’s approximately 75,000 parcels, said Auditor David Graham.

Graham said usually the driver or passenger of the van can take a photo of your home without exiting the vehicle or approaching your property. The photo’s metadata includes the location where it was taken and that can be linked to parcel numbers on record with the county.

“Instead of boots on the ground at the beginning of this project, we’re sending out vans to take pictures,” Graham said. “The condition assessment of a property is based on that photograph.”

In addition, aerial photography and a measuring tool available on the auditor’s website, enables appraisers to measure the dimensions of “a new deck for instance,” Graham said.

The auditor’s website was recently revamped with a mapping system that lets users gather more information about real estate across the county in a more interactive way.

RELATED: Upswing in Greene County property values reflects local trend

In some cases, where tall bushes or trees obscure the view of the whole property, an appraiser may need to contact property owners either by mail or knocking on the door, Graham said.

“With all of the data that we have, we are able to get a better understanding of the conditions of properties than we ever have without sending people out,” Graham said. “Back in the day, the reappraisal process involved sending appraisers into the field, assess conditions, maybe remeasure property lines, and talk to as many people as possible to determine if the property owner has made any changes. Personnel costs are so high now, that is a very expensive way to do it.”

A Tyler Technologies spokesperson said the company’s “mass appraisal business,” CLT Appraisal Services, is “the country’s oldest and only national” one and has been providing services in Greene County since the company began in the 1930s.

RELATED: Tyler completes Moraine remodeling, plans to add about 80 new jobs

“The county was also one of CLT’s first software installations back in 1976, and they remain a software client (iasWorld) even today. Over its 80 year history, CLT has worked with nearly 40 percent of the counties in Ohio,” the spokesperson said in a prepared statement.

This reappraisal cycle will include three years worth of new residential and commercial construction, much of which is occuring in the city and township of Beavercreek, Bellbrook, Sugarcreek Twp. and Xenia.

The three-year appraisal update occurred last year, and residential properties across the county increased by 5 percent from the reappraisals in 2014. The biggest increases in values, from 9 to 11 percent, occurred in Beavercreek Twp., Cedarville, Yellow Springs and Bellbrook.

Final assessments in this cycle are expected to be finished by late summer, early fall of 2020. Property owners will have an opportunity at that time to ask questions and challenge the valuations, which are used to determine how much property taxes are assessed.

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Report: Gunman demands drugs from Rite Aid in Harrison Twp.

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 7:17 PM

Robbery

An armed suspect demanded drugs and threatened employees tonight during a robbery at a Rite Aid pharmacy.

The robbery was reported around 7 p.m. at the business, 4328 N. Main St. in Harrison Twp.

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According to scanner traffic, the suspect threatened: “give me the drugs or I’ll kill you.”

Montgomery County Sheriff’s deputies were dispatched, and we have a crew on the way.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

Robbery

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ODH issues statewide community outbreak of hepatitis A

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 5:34 PM

Thirty one cases have been reported in Ohio.

The Ohio Department of Health declared a statewide community outbreak of hepatitis A Friday evening, with 79 hepatitis A cases associated with the outbreak so far this year.

As of June 1, there were 11 cases of hepatitis A in Montgomery County. In 2017 there was one case, and none were reported in 2016, Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County reported.

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Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable liver disease that usually spreads when a person ingests fecal matter — even in microscopic amounts — from contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by the stool of an infected person. Hepatitis A also can spread from close personal contact with an infected person, such as through sex, according to the ODH.

Symptoms of hepatitis A include fatigue, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, clay-colored stools and jaundice. People with hepatitis A can experience mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months.

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“Good hand-washing and vaccination are the best ways to prevent hepatitis A in at-risk individuals,” said Sietske de Fijter, state epidemiologist and chief of the ODH Bureau of Infectious Diseases. “If you or someone you know has one or more risk factors for hepatitis A, call your local health department to see about getting vaccinated.”

ODH has provided more than 5,000 doses of hepatitis A vaccine to local health departments.

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Declaring a hepatitis A outbreak ensures ODH access to additional hepatitis A vaccine through the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the ODH said.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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Statewide alert issued for missing endangered Cincinnati man

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 8:21 PM

Cecil Harry
Cecil Harry

A 67-year-old Cincinnati man is the subject of an endangered missing adult alert.

Cecil Harry left his residence around 7:30 a.m. and failed to return. He is in need of medication and law enforcement is concerned for his safety, according to the alert.

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Harry stands 6 feet, weighs 210 pounds and has gray hair and blue eyes. 

He drives a red 2001 Chrysler PT Cruiser with Ohio plates EF74BA.

Anyone who knows Harry’s whereabouts or who spots him is urged to call 911 or 1-866-693-9171.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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Dayton Air Show impacts airport commercial traffic

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 8:24 PM

Airport commercial traffic is impacted by the Vectren Dayton Air Show, according to Terry Slaybaugh--City of Dayton Director of Aviation. 

There are stretches where the air space has to be exclusively used to the air show and commercial flights have to be grounded for 30 to 45 minutes at a time. It takes a lot of coordination to minimize the impact. 

All weekend long, there will be high-flying and high-speed acts in the skies at the Dayton Air Show. During this time, the Dayton International Airport remains open for business.  

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Travelers flights still have to go on at the airport terminal during the air show. “It’s something we start working on way before the show,” said Terry Slaybaugh.

For jet teams like the Blue Angels or other supersonic fighters like the F-22 to be in the air, the airport closes its airspace for an hour at a time and no other planes are allowed to take off or land so the jets can practice safely and alone. “We’re shutting it down for a very large area. Five miles around the airport and five miles--or five thousand feet--over the airport there’s no activity,” said Slaybaugh. 

RELATED: Dayton Air Show forecast

There were three closure times scheduled tonight and there will be more this weekend. The airport tells airlines when those closures will be so carriers can schedule flights around those times to minimize any delays, but there’s a little more flexibility when propelled planes perform. “We have two parallel runways so we can actually put up the slower speed aircraft, the turbo-props. We can put them up, they can practice, and we can still operate commercial flights on our other runway,” said Slaybaugh.

All of this, plus constant communication between the air show and commercial pilots and air traffic control is what makes sure the air show weekend stays safe. “It takes a lot of cooperation from a lot of people,” said Slaybaugh.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com 

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