breaking news


State money, local tax hike may bring new school to Monroe

Published: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 12:40 PM
Updated: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 1:54 PM


            Students change classes in the junior high section of Monroe Junior/Senior High School Tuesday, Oct. 17. Monroe’s school board could decide to move on a new school tax hike and building plan next year as a way to go to handle the district’s growing enrollment. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF
Students change classes in the junior high section of Monroe Junior/Senior High School Tuesday, Oct. 17. Monroe’s school board could decide to move on a new school tax hike and building plan next year as a way to go to handle the district’s growing enrollment. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

Monroe’s newest school may rise from the site of its just-demolished, oldest school.

But residents will first have to reach into their wallets in 2018 to make it happen.

Monroe’s school board could decide to move on a new school tax hike and building plan next year as a way to go to handle the district’s growing enrollment.

MORE: Growing Monroe Schools needs more classrooms, officials say

The community heard some of the building options Monday during a special public presentation by school officials at the Butler County district’s grades two through 12 school building, which has been suffering overcrowding in recent years.

Adding to the squeeze is Monroe’s aging primary school, which was built in 1954.

The primary school, which is adjacent to the now empty 29 acres that used to be the former Lemon-Monroe school campus, may also be demolished to make way for a new elementary or middle school under one of the scenarios being considered by school officials.

MORE: Monroe’s oldest school demolished

“We are packed to the gills,” Monroe Board of Education Vice President David Grant told more than 80 residents who attended the public forum designed to answer their questions and layout the possible timeline for a school tax hike and new building.

District officials said the decision to put a school building bond issue on November 2018 ballot will require gathering more information from state education officials. Specifically those at the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission (OFCC) — which will soon be providing decade-ahead enrollment projections and funding options that could mean the state will pay for about 50 percent of the costs for a new school.

The amount of the tax bond issue to cover school construction costs, its mileage and cost per property owner will be determined by OFCC and other calculations by spring of 2018, according to school district officials.

When the Monroe school system split from Middletown Schools in 2001, it enrolled 1,300 students. Enrollment now is more than 2,800.

RELATED: 5 things to know about Monroe Schools

Monroe Junior High Principal Joe Ward told the audience that classrooms are overflowing and often students are forced to study in the hallways.

“We’ve grown too much. We’ve turned offices into classrooms and our media center is no longer a media center but now holds classes and our school resource officer works in a converted closet,” said Ward.

Monroe Superintendent Phil Cagwin said OFCC officials have already told district officials they will not pay for any renovation of Monroe Primary School because it’s too old.

MORE: Monroe school leader announces retirement

That school — at 225 Macready Ave. — houses student in pre-kindergarten through first grade.

District officials said they estimate that if the school board green lights the new school project — and if voters in November 2018 approve a school bond issue — a new school, which would have students from three to four various grade levels, could open in 2021.

Residents wanting to give their opinion about the facility options can participate in an online survey or call the Monroe Board of Education office at 513-539-2536.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Police: Man shot in head drives to Speedway in Dayton for help

Published: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 10:59 PM
Updated: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 11:15 PM

Man shot in Dayton

A man who was shot in the head tonight drove to a Speedway gas station for help.

The victim was shot through his vehicle’s windshield in the 100 block of Huffman Avenue near Jersey Street. The shooting was reported just before 10 p.m. after the victim drove himself to Speedway, 1556 Huffman Ave., to get help, police said.

>> Dayton man stabs dog that charged at him and his puppy

The victim was taken to Miami Valley Hospital with injuries that are not life-threatening, Dayton police said. His name, age and condition were not immediately available.

Huffman Avenue at South Smithville Road is blocked as police investigate.

Police have not released any suspect information or whether anyone is in custody.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Why leaving a water bottle in your car could be dangerous

Published: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 11:09 PM

You might not want to leave water bottles in your car, according to officials at the Midwest Fire Department in Oklahoma.
Art-Of-Photo/Getty Images/iStockphoto
You might not want to leave water bottles in your car, according to officials at the Midwest Fire Department in Oklahoma.(Art-Of-Photo/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

On scorching summer days, taking a nice cold bottle of water for your drive seems like a natural fit.

But it could lead to startling consequences, firefighters say.

>> Read more trending news

One Oklahoma fire department and a power company in Idaho recently demonstrated how a partly filled water bottle could magnify the sun’s rays and start a fire.

David Richardson, of the Midwest Fire Department in Oklahoma, told KFOR the sunlight “uses the liquid and the clear material to develop a focused beam, and sure enough, it can actually cause a fire.”

“The sunlight will come through (the bottle) when it’s filled with liquid and act as a magnifying glass as you would with regular optics,” said Richardson.

A test at the fire department, outside a car, showed sunlight going through a water bottle raised the temperature of a piece of paper to 250 degrees, KFOR reported.

Representatives from Idaho Power also showed the same potential problem in a Facebook post in July, with a video showing direct sunlight going through a water bottle leaving smoke and burn marks in car seats before the bottle was removed.

While the risk of fire is relatively small, officials recommend keeping water bottles out of unattended vehicles, KFOR reported.

Read more at KFOR.

 

Trending - Most Read Stories

The difference between meteorological and astronomical seasons

Published: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 9:36 PM

File photo
Carsten Koall/Getty Images
File photo(Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

June 1 marked the official start to the summer season based on the meteorological calendar.

>> Read more trending news

Typically, many think of the first day of summer arriving in late June, usually on or around June 21, but there are major differences when comparing the meteorological and astronomical seasons.

Dating back to the early-to-mid 20th century, meteorologists have set official seasons based on the same date each year. Summer starts June 1, lasting until Aug. 31. Fall runs from Sept. 1 until Nov. 30, followed by winter from Dec.1 through Feb. 28, and finally spring season from March 1 to May 31.

Meteorologists believe that keeping the exact three-month pattern can reflect accurate climatological statistics when comparing year-to-year.

Meanwhile, astronomical seasons are based on the position of the Earth in relation to the sun.

This year, astronomical summer starts June 21, the date of the summer solstice. This date typically varies between June 21 or 22, depending on the solstice.

Astronomical winter also varies between Dec. 21 or 22, the date of the solstice. Spring and fall both depend on the vernal and autumnal equinoxes.

Since it takes 354.24 days for the earth to travel around the sun, an extra day is needed every four years, known as Leap Year. This can cause the dates of solstices and equinoxes to vary.

>> Got a question about the news? See our explainers here

That, combined with the fact that the elliptical path of the Earth around the sun can cause the length of the path and seasons to be inconsistent, makes keeping climatological statistics confusing year-to-year.

Trending - Most Read Stories

After Trump visit, Republicans try to rally behind immigration bill

Published: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 11:07 PM

President Donald Trump tried on Tuesday evening to push Republicans in the House to pass an immigration reform bill later this week, basically telling GOP lawmakers he would support whatever they could pass, as Republicans struggled to find the votes to do that, and pressed the White House to back off a new policy that separates some illegal immigrant kids from their parents after being picked up at the border.

“The system’s been broken for many years,” the President told reporters at the Capitol before the unusual Tuesday evening gathering.

“The immigration system, it’s been a really bad, bad. system, probably the worst anywhere in the world. And we’re gonna try and see if we can fix it.”

Earlier in the day, the President had told a gathering of business leaders that he would not back off his calls for major changes in U.S. immigration laws.

“When people come up, they have to know they’re never going to get in, or else it’s never going to stop,” Mr. Trump said of the flow of illegal immigration across the southern border with Mexico.

But complicating matters for the President was the recent move to force the separation of children and parents, if the parents were being charged for illegally entering the United States, as that continued to draw stern opposition from GOP lawmakers of all stripes.

“All of us are horrified at the images that we are seeing,” said Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX).

“We ought to stop separating families,” said Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS). “The Administration disagrees,” as GOP lawmakers said the conflict wasn’t really discussed during the Tuesday night meeting with Mr. Trump.

“We can have strong border security without separating families,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH).

13 GOP Senators signed a letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, asking the Trump Administration to “halt current policies leading to the forced separation of minor children from their parents,” but that missive fell on deaf ears at the White House, as GOP lawmakers scrambled for kind of legislative answer.

House GOP leaders on Tuesday night posted two different immigration bills for possible House votes – one was a more conservative plan backed by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), which was unlikely to get close to a majority; a second was a more moderate bill that lacked the support of conservatives.

It left many unsure what would happen if votes occurred this week on the House floor.

“I’m still working through whether I can vote for the compromise bill,” said Rep. Warren Davidson (R-OH), as more conservative lawmakers withheld their support from the only all-GOP plan that has a chance for approval.

Meanwhile, even as Mr. Trump tried to push Republicans to stick together on immigration, he managed to cause some internal GOP pain, as lawmakers said the President – during the closed door meeting with House lawmakers – took a verbal shot at Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC), who lost his primary a week ago to a candidate backed by the President.

“Is Mark Sanford here? I just want to congratulate him on running a great race,” the President reportedly said, drawing quiet groans and hisses from some GOP members.

One Republican, Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) said later on Twitter, that the jab was uncalled for.

“This was a classless cheap shot,” Amash wrote.

Trending - Most Read Stories