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Premier Health to close Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton 

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 9:53 AM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 10:55 AM

Premiere health partners announces surprise move as part of their strategic vision plan

A city that has had its share of economic body blows took another one Wednesday with the news that Good Samaritan Hospital will close its doors by the end of the year and move 1,600 jobs out of the northwest Dayton neighborhood where it has served as an anchor for nearly a century.

The shocking news, announced Wednesday morning by Dayton-based Premier Health — Good Samaritan’s parent network — caught employees and city officials off-guard as few outside of Premier’s office suites apparently saw it coming.

“Not only was Good Sam an economic anchor to northwest Dayton, but they also were a neighborhood stabilizer,” said Dayton City Manager Shelley Dickstein. “We are gravely concerned about an exit of that anchoring presence.”

Premier said its goal is to offer all employees other positions in the company. But that isn’t much solace for the neighborhood around the massive complex, which was first constructed in 1928 and added onto many times since.

RELATED: Special Report: Million dollar paychecks for top hospital CEOs

The satellite locations – Good Samaritan North in Englewood and Good Samaritan Health Center Huber Heights – will stay open. The hospital’s federally qualified health center that is on site will also remain open, which officials said is a busy ambulatory center with primary care and as well as some specialists.

Premier CEO Mary Boosalis said the emotional decision to close the hospital wasn’t an easy choice.

“On a personal note, I can tell you that this is the most difficult but necessary decision that most of us ever have to make,” she said, adding: “The consequences of inaction are far too great because we know the status quo is unsustainable in this environment.”

Premier officials said the aging Good Sam campus is expensive to keep up and duplicates many services five miles from Miami Valley Hospital, another Premier-affiliate. The population in the surrounding neighborhoods are declining and the hospital is operating at half capacity, with Premier already shifting beds to other hospitals in the system.

RELATED: Good Samaritan Hospital closing: What we know now

Premier — the region’s largest private employer — operates three other hospitals and a large physician network goal.

But like other hospital networks across the country, Premier has been betting that their future isn’t more hospitals; it’s outpatient facilities and smaller health care centers.

The typical hospital stay has been getting shorter and the number of people needing to be hospitalized is down. Premier’s hospitals in Dayton are at about 50 percent capacity.

Declining reimbursements and a tumultuous health care climate in Washington, D.C. also have hospital systems like Premier feeling squeezed.

“Dayton, Ohio, is essentially a microcosm of the pressures you see in our industry nationally,” Boosalis said.

RELATED: Local leaders ‘saddened’ by announced hospital closing

The 2222 Philadelphia Drive hospital campus is aging and Boosalis said it would cost more than $90 million or more to keep the facility up to code over the next decade.

Premier will also save about $7 million to $8 million annually in operating costs by shifting services to other hospitals.

Boosalis said by closing the hospital now instead of later “we’re doing this now from a position of strength so we can be around for another 125 years.

“I think the worst thing our board and myself could do would be not to pay attention to the factors in this industry and ignore the facts and then be in a crisis mode.”

The goal is to move major services to Miami Valley Hospital and avoid duplication of services.

The board of trustees has approved a “significant” donation to the site for redevelopment so the goal is to make it shovel ready with the exception of the remaining buildings and work with the community on the future of the location.

All the buildings will be razed with the exception of the federally qualified health center and the parking garage.

RELATED: 5 things you need to know about Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton

Premier plans to have meetings with community leaders, focus groups and surveys as part of its outreach activities while it makes a plan for the future of the Good Samaritan site. City Wide Development and Planning NEXT, a design firm based in Columbus, are working with Premier on the site plan.

“The input of the community is not only wanted, It’s absolutely critical as we work together to transform Good Samaritan Hospital as we go forward,” Boosalis said.

Bryan Bucklew, president and CEO of the Greater Dayton Area Hospital Association, said there’s been huge changes in the health care delivery trends and health care policy that have shaped how hospitals make infrastructure decisions.

The average length of a hospital stay was 11 days in 1975, a little over 6 days in 2008, and then by 2015 was down to an average of 3 days.

“So in just six or seven years, you’ve decreased your length of stays by almost 49 percent,” he said.

RELATED: Premier Health, UnitedHealthcare have contract deal

On top of that, about 79 percent of patients in the Dayton area pay with Medicaid and Medicare, so dramatic policy changes and uncertain future of health care of those government insurance programs all shake up local hospitals.

Bucklew said said it’s important that the local hospital networks are all non-profits and locally headquartered, with trustees who live in the communities affected by their decisions. He said Premier is still being mission-minded when weighing decisions like closing Good Sam and if the hospital networks were instead for-profit, the community would feel the negative affects during tough financial times.

“If these organizations were run like for-profit entities, there would be whole service lines that would go away. No one would get into mental or behavioral health. No one would get into detox centers,” he said.

Scott McGohan, CEO of McGohan Brabender, the largest local employee benefits firm, said the employers he works with want to lower the cost of health care and part of making health care more affordable is making tough decisions like closing Good Sam.

“As we pepper these institutions to lower health care costs … it’s hard to condemn them for making these decisions,” said McGohan.

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LIVE UPDATES: Barbara Bush funeral in Houston

Published: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 10:20 AM
Updated: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 11:52 AM

Barbara Bush Through The Years

Approximately 1,500 guests are expected to attend former first lady Barbara Bush's funeral in Houston Saturday.

Barbara Bush, the wife of the nation’s 41st president and mother of the nation’s 43rd, died Tuesday at her Houston home. She was 92.

About 2,500 mourners paid their respect at a public viewing held Friday in Houston, The Associated Press reported.

>> Read more trending news 

The service will take place at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston. Jeb Bush will deliver a eulogy for his mother. Longtime friend Susan Baker and historian Jon Meacham will also speak during the 90-minute service and musical selections will be performed, The AP reported. A procession will follow, with burial at the Bush Library at Texas A&M University. The procession will go through Houston’s Memorial Park, which was beloved by the Bushes. Barbara Bush will be buried next to her daughter, Robin, who was 3 years old when she died of leukemia in 1953, The AP reported.

Notable guests will include first lady Melania Trump, former President Bill Clinton, former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama, The AP reported.

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Spring is back for the weekend

Published: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 6:38 AM
Updated: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 7:15 AM

The chance for rain returns early next week.

It will be a chilly morning with temperatures climbing out of the 30s, according to Storm Center 7 Meteorologist McCall Vrydaghs. There will be some patchy morning frost but will quickly melt after sunrise. Some high clouds build for the afternoon but it will stay dry and mild with temperatures approaching 60 degrees. Clouds will linger through the night but it won’t be too cool. Overnight lows will be near 40 degrees.

5-Day Forecast

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Patchy morning frost
  • Scattered clouds, still warmer for the weekend
  • Lyrid meteor shower peaks this weekend

DETAILED FORECAST:

Sunday: It will be partly sunny and mild again with temperatures closer to normal in the lower 60s.

WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Monday: Clouds increase with the slight chance of a few showers south, late. Highs will reach into the middle 60s.

Tuesday: We will see mostly cloudy skies with a chance for showers. Highs will drop back into the upper 50s.

County-by-County Weather

Wednesday: Scattered showers are expected with a high near 60 degrees.

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E. coli outbreak: CDC warns to ‘avoid all types of romaine lettuce’

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 5:42 PM

E. Coli Outbreak: 'Avoid All Types Of Lettuce' CDC Warns

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has expanded its warning to include all types of romaine lettuce. The warning now includes whole heads and hearts of romaine lettuce, in addition to chopped romaine and salads and salad mixes containing romaine.

The CDC also asks consumers to “not buy or eat romaine lettuce at a grocery store or restaurant unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma, Arizona, growing region.”

Additionally, the CDC suggests that consumers throw away any romaine lettuce in the home, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.

>> Read more trending news 

At least 31 people have been hospitalized, including three who developed a type of kidney failure, according to the CDC.

The affected states include

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Connecticut
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Louisiana
  • Michigan
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • Virginia
  • Washington

No deaths related to the outbreak have been reported.

The CDC has not yet identified the grower or a common brand, and is urging people not to eat chopped lettuce from the Yuma area.

Symptoms of an E. coli infection vary, but often include severe stomach cramps and diarrhea, which is often bloody. Most people get better in five to seven days. Infections can be mild, but can also be severe and even life-threatening.

If you think you have E. coli, the CDC says to talk to your health care provider or public health department and write down what you ate in the week before you got sick.

People started reporting illnesses that are part of the outbreak between March 22 and March 31.

DNA fingerprinting is being used to identify illnesses that are part of the same outbreak. Some people might not be included in the CDC’s case count if officials weren’t able to get bacteria strains needed for DNA fingerprinting to link them to the outbreak.

To reduce your risk of an E. coli infection, you can:

  • Wash your hands. Wash hands after using the restroom or changing diapers, before and after preparing or eating food and after contact with animals.
  • Cook meats thoroughly to kill harmful germs.
  • Thoroughly wash hands, counters, cutting boards and utensils after they touch raw meat.
  • Wash fruits and vegetables before eating.
  • Avoid raw milk, other unpasteurized dairy products and unpasteurized juices.
  • Don’t prepare food or drink for others when you are sick.

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NYC postal worker arrested after police find 17,000 pieces of undelivered mail

Published: Saturday, April 21, 2018 @ 11:09 AM

Bags of mail are carted by a postal worker.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Bags of mail are carted by a postal worker.(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A New York City postal worker was arrested Thursday after 17,000 pieces of undelivered mail were found in his car, apartment and locker, authorities said.

>> Read more trending news

Aleksey Germash, who has worked for the U.S. Postal Service for more than 16 years, possessed undelivered mail since 2005, WPIX reported. He told investigators he held onto the mail because he was overwhelmed by how much mail he had to deliver. Germash said he delivered “the important stuff,” WPIX reported.

Postal officials said they found 10,000 pieces of undelivered mail in his car, 6,000 in his apartment and another 1,000 in his locker. An investigation began when USPS officials found 20 full bags in his car Wednesday, WPIX reported. He was arrested the following day.

Germash is not the first postal worker to hold onto mail. Agents arrested a Long Island letter carrier earlier this month after they found dozens of bags filled with undelivered mail behind his home.

>> Indiana carrier charged with throwing away, hiding mail

Earlier this month, an Indiana mail carrier was charged with throwing away or holding onto thousands of pieces of mail. In February, a postal carrier in Florida 

refused to deliver packages inside the gates of a nudist resort.

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