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Yellowstone supervolcano could erupt much sooner than predicted, study reveals

Published: Thursday, October 12, 2017 @ 6:59 PM

Yellowstone Supervolcano Could Erupt Much Sooner Than Predicted

If the supervolcano under Yellowstone National Park erupted tomorrow, life as we know it would come to an abrupt, yet perhaps agonizingly slow, end.

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Ash from a mega-eruption at Yellowstone would spread across the U.S., covering nearby states such as Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado and Montana in up to three feet of ash, according to a 2014 study of what might happen if a supervolcano erupted, and blanketing the Midwest and other parts of the U.S., killing animals and plants, affecting the power grid and destroying buildings, causing a volcanic winter. 

Up to now, scientists thought another supervolcano eruption might not occur for centuries, but a new study by researchers at Arizona State University found it could happen much sooner -- in just decades, according to National Geographic.

The ASU scientists studied minerals in fossilized ash around the volcano and discovered that the critical changes in temperature and composition that would signal an impending eruption occurred in a matter of decades, not centuries, National Geographic reported.

The park basically sits on a giant magma reservoir inside three overlapping calderas, or bowl-shaped depressions formed when an underground magma chamber erupted, Live Science reported

According to scientists, Yellowstone’s supervolcano has erupted three times. The first eruption occurred just over 2 million years ago. The second blast struck 1.3 million years ago and the last eruption happened 640,000 years ago.

>> Related: Man dissolves after trying to soak in Yellowstone hot pool

Arizona State researchers told The New York Times more studies are needed before an absolute conclusion about another supervolcano eruption can be determined. 

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Longest nonstop flight ready to take off

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 7:49 AM

Singapore Airlines Announces New World's Longest Nonstop Flight

What’s the longest nonstop flight you’ve been on? Maybe a five-hour trip between Los Angeles and Hawaii? Or maybe it’s a flight between New York and London that’s more than 7 hours.

Whatever the time is, the trips have nothing on Singapore’s newest flight.

Thanks to the Airbus A350-900ULR that’s being produced, the airline is planning on offering a nonstop flight between New York and Singapore that will last nearly 20 hours in the air, CNN reported.

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The ultra long-range plane had its first test flight Monday with a nearly five-hour round-trip from an assembly plant in Toulouse, France.

Singapore Airlines ordered seven of the new planes that replace the A340-500 that the airlines grounded in 2013, CNN reported.

The plane offers high ceilings and LED lighting and promises low noise level, CNN reported.

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FDA launches crackdown on Juul e-cigarettes, vaping retailers

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 9:56 AM

This image provided by Juul Labs on Tuesday, April 24, 2018 shows the company's e-cigarette device. On Tuesday, federal health officials announced a nationwide crackdown on underage use of a popular e-cigarette brand following months of complaints from parents, politicians and school administrators. Juul Labs says it monitors retailers to ensure they are following the law, and its age verification system searches public records and sometimes requires customers to upload a photo ID. (Courtesy of Juul Labs via AP)
Arturo Torres/AP
This image provided by Juul Labs on Tuesday, April 24, 2018 shows the company's e-cigarette device. On Tuesday, federal health officials announced a nationwide crackdown on underage use of a popular e-cigarette brand following months of complaints from parents, politicians and school administrators. Juul Labs says it monitors retailers to ensure they are following the law, and its age verification system searches public records and sometimes requires customers to upload a photo ID. (Courtesy of Juul Labs via AP)(Arturo Torres/AP)

The Food and Drug Administration is cracking down on the vaping industry, particularly on the devices being marketed towards teenagers.

The federal agency launched an undercover sting operation this month targeting retailers of Juul devices. It included gas stations, convenience stores and online retailers -- accusing them of selling products to minors.

The FDA says that electronic cigarettes have become widely popular with kids.

So far, the agency has issued warning letters to 40 retailers it says violated the law preventing sales of vaping devices to anyone under 21.

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The agency also demanded that Juul Labs turn over company documents about the marketing and research behind its products.

MORE: Doctor warns parents of dangers of Juul e-cigarettes

Those documents include reports on focus groups and toxicology, to determine whether Juul Labs is intentionally appealing to a particular market.

Nicknamed the iPhone of e-cigarettes, Juul devices resemble thumb drives and produce a small plume and smell like fruit or other flavorings.

Some say the smell is so concealable, students can even vape in class without it being noticed.

In a statement, Juul Labs said it agreed with the FDA, saying illegal sales of the company's product to minors is unacceptable.

The company says it is working with the FDA, lawmakers and parents to combat underage vaping.

Meanwhile, the FDA says it plans to issue similar letters to other manufacturers of popular vaping products.

MORE: Growing concern about 'Juuling' among teens in local schools

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Vaping device that looks like USB drive popular with teens

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 9:29 PM

(KIRO7.com)
(KIRO7.com)

The Poison Control Center is warning parents and teens about the new vaping device Juul, which could be easily mistaken for a USB drive.

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It is small and easy to hide, but it's what is inside that has health officials so concerned.

The nicotine concentration is high. The Juul device is marketed as a way to get adults off of cigarettes and so it offers a stronger nicotine content.

Health officials say teens who would never consider smoking cigarettes are "Juuling" and the popularity is growing.

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What parents need to know about 'dry' and 'secondary' drowning

Published: Wednesday, June 07, 2017 @ 5:39 PM
Updated: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 9:52 AM

Dry Drowning and Secondary Drowning Explained

On average, 10 people will die in the United States today as a result of drowning. 

The image most of us have of a drowning is one of a person flailing in deep water then going under and not coming back up. However, something many people may not know is that not all drownings happen while the person is in the water.

>> Got a question about the news? See our explainers here

To that end, water safety and medical experts are encouraging parents to think of drowning as a process and not an end result of being under water for too long. The prospect of a child drowning after leaving the pool or beach is one not many parents have considered. 

Here’s a quick look at two ways – dry drowning and secondary drowning – a person can drown hours after leaving the water.

What is "dry drowning?"

Dry drowning happens when water irritates the larynx (vocal chords), and the person has a severe inflammatory reaction to it. The reaction causes the vocal chords to spasm (laryngospasm reflex) and that causes them to close. The person then has trouble or cannot pass air into their lungs. Laryngospasm can cause something called neurogenic pulmonary edema which causes an increase in pressure in the lungs and heart, reducing the body's ability to get oxygen. Laryngospasm can be triggered by something as simple as droplets if water hitting the larynx. High-speed submersion, such as when you go down a water slide or jump from a high dive, can also cause the reaction.

How is it different from “secondary drowning?”

Secondary drowning happens when water gets into the lungs. It is usually a small amount of water, but it fills the air sacs of the lungs, causing pulmonary edema – or fluid in the lungs. With water in the air sacs, there is no room for air, so the person begins to drown. Secondary, or delayed drowning as it is sometimes called, can happen hours after inhaling the water.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of dry drowning and secondary drowning are similar and can be seen from between one hour to 24 hours after the incident. Usually sooner rather than later with dry drowning.

The symptoms include:

  • Coughing
  • Gasping
  • Chest pain
  • Trouble breathing
  • Feeling extremely tired
  • Lips or skin turning blue
  • Changes in behavior
  • A high-pitched breathing sound called stridor
  • Foam around the mouth – Anyone pulled from the water who is coughing or sputtering and has foam around their mouth needs emergency care immediately.

If a person who has been in water shows any of these symptoms, call 911 or get them to a hospital emergency room as soon as possible.

How is it treated?

It depends. Treatment can range from observation for a few hours,  to administering oxygen, to chest x-rays or more advanced medical support – intubation or use of a ventilator – in the most severe cases. (that is rare).

How do I prevent it?

Here are a few tips:

  • Obviously, watch your children when they are in and around water, any water. It takes only moments to take in enough water to cause drowning.
  • Make sure kids know how to swim and watch to make sure weak swimmers don’t go out beyond their abilities.
  • Don’t let kids get too tired in the water.
  • Encourage them to keep their mouths closed when going under water or when their faces are near the water.
  • Remember the symptoms. If you see any in your child, take him to the hospital.

How often does this happen?

Dry drownings and secondary drownings are rare. They account for between 1 and 2 percent of all drownings in the United States.

Sources: WebMD; healthychildren.org; livescience.com; clevelandclinic.org

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