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Woman says she found worm in fish bought at Costco

Published: Saturday, February 17, 2018 @ 11:57 AM

LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 12:  A Costco sign is displayed on March 12, 2013 in Los Angeles, California.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 12: A Costco sign is displayed on March 12, 2013 in Los Angeles, California.(Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

A Maryland woman says there was a live surprise in a package of fish she purchased at Costco last week.

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Emily Rhoades Randolph said she purchased a package of fresh cod on Feb. 9 at Costco. On Monday, she recorded video of what appears to be a worm wriggling around a corner of the sealed package and posted it on her Facebook page on Wednesday. The sell-by date on the package is the same day she recorded the video, according to Randolph.

Randolph said in the Facebook post that when she returned the contaminated fish to Costco, the clerk at the seafood counter commented that another customer had returned salmon with worms in it. Randolph said she did not receive an apology for the incident.

Randolph shared the incident to warn others to check their food.

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Jimmy Carter: What to know about the former president and humanitarian

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 4:52 PM

What You Need to Know about Jimmy Carter

President Jimmy Carter served as the 39th president of the United States, from 1977 to 1981, but before that, he was the 76th governor of Georgia and a member of the Georgia State Senate. 

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Although he’s had a lengthy career in politics, Carter has  worked as a diplomat and humanitarian. He’s also authored dozens of books.

Here are some things to know about President Carter.

Naval Academy graduate

Carter graduated from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, at the top of his class in 1946. He started a Navy career soon after, spending five years on submarine duty.

Related: Photos: Jimmy Carter through the years

Father of four

Carter married Rosalynn Smith, who became Rosalynn Carter, in 1946, soon after graduating from high school. They had four children: Jack Carter, born in 1947; James Carter, born in 1950; Donnel Carter, born in 1952; and Amy Carter, born in 1967.

Photos: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter's 70-year marriage

Rebuilt family’s peanut warehouse

In his hometown of Plains, Georgia, Carter’s parents, Earl and Lillian Carter, owned a peanut farm, warehouse and store. When Earl Carter died of cancer in 1953, Carter resigned from the Navy, came back home and worked to rebuild the business. Despite a drought in 1954 and a boycott against integration, Carter made the business profitable by 1959.

Related: How Jimmy Carter changed the world

Devoted to humanitarianism

The Carter Center opened in 1986, and its mission, in partnership with Emory University in Atlanta, is to resolve conflicts and improve human health through a commitment to human rights. Part of that work led Carter to be honored with the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002.

Cancer survivor

Carter was diagnosed with stage 4 melanoma in August 2015. While teaching Sunday school at Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, he said he had surgery on a mass on his liver and had radiation treatment on four melanoma spots in his brain.

Despite the diagnosis, Carter remained active in his humanitarian work, helping build a Habitat for Humanity house in Memphis, Tennessee. 

Related: Carter: Cancer is gone

By December 2015, Carter said, “My most recent MRI brain scan did not reveal any signs of the original cancer spots nor any new ones.”

In May 2016, Carter Center director of communications Deanna Congileo confirmed that Carter did not need any more treatments but would “continue scans and resume treatment if necessary.” 

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Man who allegedly owes $30k in child support admonished by sheriff on Facebook

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 4:56 PM

Michael Glenn Hovis is wanted for a probation violation and for $30,000 in back child support, according to the Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office.
Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office
Michael Glenn Hovis is wanted for a probation violation and for $30,000 in back child support, according to the Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office.(Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office)

At first glance, a Facebook post from the Gwinnett County sheriff’s office in Georgia seems normal.

“Our deputies are looking for 40-year-old Michael Glenn Hovis, who's wanted by police for probation violation,” the sheriff’s office said in the post.

Around the third sentence, things take a turn, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

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“We're certain that his children will appreciate any information you can provide to help us find him since they want to eat and keep a roof over their heads,” officials said.

According to the sheriff’s office, Hovis owes more than $30,000 in child support, too.

After asking those with information about Hovis’ whereabouts to call the sheriff’s office, authorities address him directly.

“Mr. Hovis,” the sheriff’s office said, “if you see this post, you should consider turning yourself in. It's never too late to start doing the right thing.”

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Dog shot multiple times in face adopted by park ranger in Arkansas

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 3:56 PM

Hope, a 4-year-old dog shot in the face, has been adopted by Arkansas park ranger Levi Koch.
HOPE Humane Society
Hope, a 4-year-old dog shot in the face, has been adopted by Arkansas park ranger Levi Koch.(HOPE Humane Society)

A dog who survived three gunshots to the face has found a new home with an Arkansas park ranger.

Hope, a 4-year-old mixed breed dog, was tied to a pole and shot in the face three times this March, according to KFSM.

Hope has scars on her face from where the bullets entered and will need possible mouth surgery in the future, but otherwise her health is back to normal.

Amber Neal, the director of the Hope Humane Society, told WGHP that she was by Hope’s side while she healed, but realized it was time for the dog to find a forever home.

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“She's one amazing dog and she deserves the most amazing home,” Neal said. “With me having such a busy work schedule, with all the other babies that I am trying to save, she needs to be somebody's constant companion and that would make her the happiest dog in the world.”

Hope, a 4-year-old dog that survived being shot in face, has been adopted by a park ranger in Arkansas.(HOPE Humane Society)

Hope was brought to the Fort Smith Nature Center on Wednesday, where she met Arkansas park ranger Levi Koch.

Koch said he was so moved by Hope’s story that he knew he had to adopt her.

“I would like someone to travel with me and see some neat places, do a lot of hiking on outdoor adventures,” Koch said.

The Hope Humane Society celebrated the news of Hope’s adoption on Facebook.

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Beltway sniper Lee Boyd Malvo granted new sentencing hearing in Virginia killings

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 3:42 PM

Lee Boyd Malvo is brought to court in Virginia Beach Oct. 22, 2003, to be identified by a witness during the capital murder trial of John Allen Muhammad. Malvo, then 17, and Muhammad, who was 41, were known as the Beltway snipers, a pair of killers who targeted more than a dozen victims over a three-week span in the fall of 2002, killing 10 people. Malvo, now 33, has been granted a new sentencing hearing in four Virginia slayings for which he was sentenced to life without parole.
Davis Turner-Pool/Getty Images
Lee Boyd Malvo is brought to court in Virginia Beach Oct. 22, 2003, to be identified by a witness during the capital murder trial of John Allen Muhammad. Malvo, then 17, and Muhammad, who was 41, were known as the Beltway snipers, a pair of killers who targeted more than a dozen victims over a three-week span in the fall of 2002, killing 10 people. Malvo, now 33, has been granted a new sentencing hearing in four Virginia slayings for which he was sentenced to life without parole.(Davis Turner-Pool/Getty Images)

A man who as a teenager participated in a terrifying killing spree that left more than a dozen people dead has been granted a new sentencing hearing in Virginia.

Lee Boyd Malvo, now 33, was sentenced in 2004 to life in prison without the possibility of parole for a series of four murders he and John Allen Muhammad committed as the Beltway snipers. Malvo was just 17 at the time of the slayings, and Muhammad, his mentor, was 41. 

The snipers terrorized the greater Washington, D.C., area during a three-week span in 2002 that saw them kill four people and injure three others in Virginia. Another six people were gunned down in the Maryland suburbs in that same time frame. 

The pair was captured in October 2002 as they slept at a rest stop in a Chevy Caprice they had modified so they could fire a rifle, undetected, through a hole in the car’s trunk. The Washington Post reported that Muhammad and Malvo were tied to another 11 shootings across the country, five of them deadly. 

John Allen Muhammad eyes a prosecutor Oct. 21, 2003, during Muhammad's capital murder trial in Virginia Beach Circuit Court. Muhammad, 41, and Lee Boyd Malvo, then only 17, were known as the Beltway snipers, a pair of killers who targeted more than a dozen victims over a three-week span in the fall of 2002, killing 10 people. Muhammad, who represented himself at trial, was executed by lethal injection in November 2009 at age 48. Malvo, now 33, has been granted a new sentencing hearing in four Virginia slayings for which he was sentenced to life without parole.(Vicki Cronis-Pool/Getty Images)

In the years since Malvo’s and Muhammad’s convictions, and Muhammad’s subsequent 2009 execution for his Virginia crimes, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that defendants who committed serious crimes while under the age of 18 cannot be sentenced to death.

They also cannot be sentenced to a mandatory sentence of life in prison without parole, the ruling stated. The new laws became retroactive in 2016, meaning that sentences of death or life without parole that were legal at the time they were handed down could now be vacated. 

A three-member panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled on Thursday that Malvo falls into that category and vacated his four life sentences. His case has been remanded to a lower court for resentencing. 

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“To be clear, the crimes committed by Malvo and John Muhammad were the most heinous random acts of premeditated violence conceivable, destroying lives and families and terrorizing the entire Washington, D.C., metropolitan area for over six weeks, instilling mortal fear daily in the citizens of that community,” Judge Paul Niemeyer wrote in the ruling. “But Malvo was 17 years old when he committed the murders, and he has the retroactive benefit of new constitutional rules that treat juveniles differently for sentencing.

“We make this ruling not with any satisfaction but to sustain the law. As for Malvo, who knows but God how he will bear the future.”

See the appeals court’s entire ruling below. 

Lee Boyd Malvo Ruling by c_bonvillian on Scribd

The order for a new sentencing applies only to Malvo’s Virginia crimes. He also pleaded guilty to six murders in Maryland, where he was given six life sentences. 

Thursday’s ruling does not affect his prison time in Maryland, according to The Washington Post. A Montgomery County judge last August upheld those sentences because they were not mandatory life terms. 

A spokeswoman for Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring told the Post that his staff attorneys plan to “review the decision closely and decide how best to proceed in a way that ensures this convicted mass murderer faces justice for his heinous crimes.” The attorney general can either ask the entire appeals court for a rehearing, appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court or go forward with the new sentencing hearing.

If the sentencing hearing goes forward, Malvo could still be sentenced to life in prison. The appeals court ruling indicated that it depends on whether the district court finds that Malvo’s crimes reflected “permanent incorrigibility” or the “transient immaturity of youth.”

The appeals court’s ruling listed a timeline of most of Malvo and Muhammad’s crimes:

  • Sept. 5, 2002: Malvo shot a pizza restaurant owner six times in Clinton, Maryland, and stole the man’s cash and laptop. The man survived and, according to the FBI, his laptop, which was found in the snipers’ car when they were captured, was used to plot out attack sites and getaway routes. 
  • Sept. 15, 2002: Malvo shot a man in Clinton as the victim closed a liquor store for the night.
  • Sept. 21, 2002: Muhammad used a high-powered Bushmaster rifle to target two women closing down a liquor store in Montgomery, Alabama. Claudine Parker, 52, was killed and her coworker, Kellie Adams, was wounded by a gunshot to the back of her neck and into her jaw.

Adams told The New York Times shortly after the shooting that she thought she had been struck by lightning. Witnesses, including two police officers, spotted a man rifling through the women’s purses before escaping during a short foot chase, the Times reported. 

A blue sedan was also spotted near the scene, which helped lead investigators to the snipers after Malvo’s fingerprint, found on the page of a magazine he dropped in Montgomery, identified him as a suspect. 

  • Sept. 23, 2002: A Baton Rouge, Louisiana, woman, identified as 45-year-old Hong Im Ballenger, was killed as she closed the store where she worked. Again, witnesses later placed Malvo at the scene, fleeing with the victim’s purse. 
  • Oct. 2, 2002: Back in the D.C. area, the snipers shot and killed James Martin, 55, in a Montgomery County, Maryland grocery store parking lot. 
  • Oct. 3, 2002: Five people were gunned down, four at different sites in Montgomery County and a fifth in Washington, D.C. James “Sonny” Buchanan, 39, was killed as he mowed some grass; taxi driver Prem Kumar Walekar, 54, was killed while gassing up his cab; Sarah Ramos, 34, was killed as she sat on a bus bench and read a book; Lori Ann Lewis-Rivera, 25, was killed as she vacuumed her van at a gas station. 

The four Montgomery County victims were killed in the morning within a span of about two hours, according to authorities. Around 9:20 p.m. that same night, Pascal Charlot, 72, was shot while walking in D.C. 

  • Oct. 4, 2002: A woman was shot and seriously wounded as she loaded goods into her car in a Spotsylvania County, Virginia, parking lot.
  • Oct. 7, 2002: A 13-year-old boy was shot and wounded in Prince George’s County, Maryland, as he went to school. 
  • Oct 9, 2002: The snipers shot and killed Dean Harold Myers, 53, as he put gas in his vehicle at a Prince William County, Virginia, gas station.
  • Oct. 12, 2002: The snipers killed FBI analyst Linda Franklin, 47, outside a Home Depot in Fairfax County, Virginia.
  • Oct. 19, 2002: They shot and seriously injured a man leaving a restaurant in Ashland, Virginia.
  • Oct. 22, 2002: The snipers shot and killed bus driver Conrad Johnson, 35, in Montgomery County. The bus driver, who was gunned down as he stood on the steps of his bus, was the last of their victims. 
  • Oct. 24, 2002: The pair was apprehended at a rest stop in Frederick County, Maryland. 

The shootings on the appeals court’s list are not all of the crimes that Malvo and Muhammad have been linked to, and Malvo has said that the pair shot more people than those investigators have identified. 

At left, the cutaway in the trunk of a blue Chevy Caprice used by Beltway snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo is seen. The hole allowed a gunman to lie in the closed trunk of the car and shoot at unsuspecting victims with the Bushmaster rifle, pictured at right, that was used in more than a dozen shootings in the fall of 2002.(AP Photos)

Malvo told Virginia investigators after his arrest that he and Muhammad, who he considered his father, acted as a sniper team in order to extort $10 million from the “media and the government,” the appeals court ruling stated. He initially confessed to being the shooter in 10 of the incidents. 

When testifying at trial in Fairfax County, however, Malvo admitted only to shooting the 13-year-old boy in Prince George’s County and the Montgomery County bus driver who was killed. All others, Muhammad shot, the teen claimed. 

At that point, Malvo’s defense team was asserting an insanity defense, alleging that the boy, who had an abusive and lonely childhood in Jamaica and Antigua, was indoctrinated by Muhammad, who took him under his wing when Malvo was 15. Muhammad had taken his own three children to Antigua without their mother’s knowledge, the court ruling stated. 

Muhammad, a U.S. Army veteran who ultimately lost custody of his children, trained Malvo intensively in military tactics for almost a year, telling the teen that he had a plan to get his children back, the ruling stated. 

Mildred Muhammad, his ex-wife, has said she believed she was the ultimate target of her former husband’s rage, CNN reported. Prosecutors during John Muhammad’s trials argued that the sniper shootings were a smoke screen to hide his goal of killing Mildred and regaining custody of their children. 

Mildred Muhammad, the former wife of convicted Beltway sniper John Allen Muhammad, is shown during her testimony in the penalty phase of Muhammad's capital murder trial Nov. 19, 2003 in Virginia Beach. John Muhammad, who prosecutors argued killed at least 10 people in a string of random sniper shootings as a cover to kill his ex-wife and regain custody of their children, was ultimate sentenced to death and executed in 2009. His accomplice, Lee Boyd Malvo, is serving life in prison in Virginia.(Tracy Woodward-Pool/Getty Images)

Malvo told “Today” in 2012 that he was sexually abused by John Muhammad. He also described the psychological hold he said Muhammad had on him. 

“I couldn’t say no,” Malvo said. “I had wanted that level of love and acceptance and consistency for all of my life and couldn’t find it. And even if unconsciously, or even in moments of short reflection, I knew that it was wrong, I did not have the willpower to say no.”

In interviews with the Post, Malvo called himself a “monster.”

“If you look up the definition, that’s what a monster is” Malvo told the newspaper. “I was a ghoul. I was a thief. I stole people’s lives. I did someone else’s bidding just because they said so. There is no rhyme or reason or sense.”

Malvo told “Today” producers that the interview would be his last about the crimes, he said he had forgiven himself for his crimes because that is the “only way (he) can live with (himself.)”

He also urged the families of the victims to find peace and forgiveness.

“Please do not allow my actions and the actions of Muhammad to hold you hostage and continue to victimize you for the rest of your life,” Malvo said. “If you give those images and thoughts that power, it will continue to inflict that suffering over and over and over, and over and over again. Do not give me or him that much power.”

Malvo is housed at Red Onion State Prison in Pound, Virginia. 

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