Here’s why travelers from 22 states could face conflict with domestic flights in 2018

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 10:45 AM

Travelers From More Than 22 States Could Face Conflict With Domestic Flights

Oct. 19, 1:30 p.m. ET -- UPDATE: 

Residents in 22 states were panicking earlier this week over the possibility that their state-issued ID cards would be insufficient to access domestic flights next year. Many thought they would need passports to travel between states.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has now approved requests for an extension, granting 17 states more time to provide appropriate, REAL ID-compliant identification for residents.

>> Read more trending news 

Twenty-seven states currently provide residents with standard, compliant IDs. Seventeen states were granted an extension until Oct. 10, 2018.

>> Which states do not provide REAL ID-compliant IDs? Read more: 17 states granted extension for REAL ID compliance; Driver's license OK for domestic travel 

ORIGINAL STORY:

The deadline is approaching for nearly two dozen states that have yet to update state IDs in compliance with the REAL ID Act, which was passed in 2005.

As a result, residents in those states may have to present a valid U.S. passport or other identification -- instead of previously used driver’s licenses or IDs -- to travel within the U.S. and beyond. 

Travelers who live in the following states could be affected: 

  • Alaska
  • California
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina 
  • Washington

Residents of Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands could also be affected, as could those from Virginia.

The REAL ID Act, which “set standards for the issuance of sources of identification, ... established minimum security standards for license issuance and production and prohibits federal agencies from accepting for certain purposes driver’s licenses and identification cards from states not meeting the act’s minimum standards,” according to the Department of Homeland Security. The act came after 9/11 as an effort to ensure safer travel within the U.S. 

According to consumer expert Clark Howard, despite the fact that Congress passed the act more than 10 years ago, enforcement of the new regulations wasn’t pushed until 2013.

Twenty-six states have provided residents with federally compliant driver’s licenses or IDs. 

For those that have not, beginning Jan. 22, other forms of identification that will be accepted by Transportation Security Administration at airports for travelers living in the above listed states will be a permanent resident card/green card or a military ID. Other forms of acceptable identification are listed on the official TSA website.

Those who visit airports starting Jan. 22 without acceptable identification will not be allowed through airport security.

Some states have started working to provide residents with other forms of federally approved identification that would allow travelers to avoid ordering a passport for domestic travel, Forbes reported. For example, those in Washington have the option to apply for enhanced driver’s licenses, which adhere to the REAL ID Act specifications but cost significantly more than regular IDs.

Travelers are encouraged to check with local government officials for any potential options. 

Some of the states under review are scrambling to update state IDs to meet compliance standards in the next three months, and others have requested REAL ID compliance extensions from the Department of Homeland Security. Virginia residents have been granted an extension for REAL ID enforcement until Oct. 10, 2018. Budget shortages have delayed some states, including Oklahoma, from making the ID updates. 

Despite all extensions, there is a hard deadline for states to require compliant REAL IDs: Oct. 1, 2020.

“There are no anticipated changes to the enforcement schedule, and we are tracking that by 2020, 15 years after this act has been passed, that DHS will require that all states are compliant with Real ID as per federal law,” DHS spokeswoman Justine Whelan said, according to The Washington Post

“It is a critically important 9/11 Commission recommendation that others have been willing to ignore, but I will not,” John Kelly, President Donald Trump’s former homeland security secretary and current chief of staff, said in June. “I will ensure it is implemented on schedule -- with no extension -- for states that are not taking it seriously.”

Those who live in one of the states that do not have TSA-compliant IDs may want to consider ordering a passport sooner rather than later. It generally takes four to six weeks to process passport orders, according to the Department of State.

Read more here and here.

A previous version of this story reported travelers in nine states would potentially need passports or other forms of identification for domestic flights in 2018.

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George H.W. Bush recovering after infection, moved out of intensive care

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 2:44 PM
Updated: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 2:44 PM

Biography of George H.W. Bush

Former President George H.W. Bush has been moved from the intensive care unit at Houston Methodist Hospital to a regular patient bed days after he suffered an infection that spread to his blood, a family spokesman said Wednesday.

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First U.S. memorial to 4,400 victims of lynchings across the South opens in Alabama  

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 10:38 PM

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice memorial was created from 800 hanging steel columns with the county and names of people lynched there etched into the column, including “unknown” victims. It’s the first U.S. memorial to the victims of lynchings.
Equal Justice Initiative
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice memorial was created from 800 hanging steel columns with the county and names of people lynched there etched into the column, including “unknown” victims. It’s the first U.S. memorial to the victims of lynchings.(Equal Justice Initiative)

The first memorial in the United States dedicated to the victims of white supremacy opens in Montgomery, Alabama, Thursday.

>> Read more trending news 

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice by the non-profit Equal Justice Initiative, or EJI, overlooks the Alabama State Capitol and seeks to shine a light on a terrifying chapter of American history that is rarely talked about: the lynchings of some 4,400 black Americans across the South during a rampage of horror and violence that went on for decades.

“We need to find ways to live in this country and talk about things we haven’t talked about,” EJI founder Bryan Stevenson told The Root. Stevenson said discussing this shadowy part of American history may be uncomfortable for some, but he said it’s necessary in order to move beyond it. “It isn’t about retribution,” he said.

>> Related: ‘There’s blood everywhere’: Teen accused of premeditated murder of 11-year-old brother

Almost 25 percent of the victims of lynching were accused of sexual assault and nearly 30 percent were accused of murder, The Root reported.

The memorial was created from 800 hanging steel columns with the county and names of people lynched there etched into the column, including “unknown” victims. 

The memorial site also includes the Legacy Museum: From Slavery to Mass Incarceration

>> Related: Suspected 'Golden State Killer' arrested decades after serial rapes, murders: reports

A two-day summit, which is part of the opening events this week, is already sold out.

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WATCH: Woman pulls gun on would-be robber, saves husband, family says

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 8:37 AM

Watch: Woman Pulls Gun On Robber, Saving Her Family

Police in Memphis, Tennessee, are searching for a man who allegedly attempted a robbery outside a Whitehaven home in broad daylight.

>> Watch the news report here

A surveillance camera captured the weekend incident.

>> Watch the surveillance footage here

One of the victims, who asked not to be identified, told WHBQ that his niece, who was visiting from Florida, took his gun and scared off the bold criminal after she saw that her husband was in trouble.

“She’s bold," he said. "She ain’t scared of nothing.”

In the video, the suspect has his right hand in his waist band as he stands behind the woman's husband. The victims said the man’s hand was on a gun.

Memphis police said Sunday afternoon the man in the blue jacket came to the Whitehaven home and asked to use one of the victims’ phones and then asked for a ride.

>> Read more trending news 

While the incident was unfolding outside the house, the woman and her uncle reportedly were inside the house.

Police said that after the woman saw her husband in trouble, she came out the front door with a gun and fired a warning shot.

The uncle told WHBQ: “She said she didn’t want to kill him, but when he fired back at us after she fired the warning shot, she said she was trying to hit him then but didn’t.”

Memphis police told WHBQ that the suspect ran toward the back of the house before getting away.

Police said they are reviewing this surveillance video to get a positive ID on the suspect. If you have any information on who that suspect may be, call CrimeStoppers at 901-528-CASH.

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Florida woman says HOA member told her to remove rainbow flag

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 @ 8:21 PM

Florida Woman Allegedly Told By HOA Member To Remove Rainbow Flag

A rainbow flag has created controversy in a Brevard County, Florida, neighborhood -- so much so that one HOA member compared it to the Confederate flag.

>> Read more trending news

A renter in Rockledge's Ashwood Lakes subdivision said she was told to lower a gay pride flag after having flown it for two years.

"It's a symbol of acceptance, tolerance and equality," said Jenifer Raymond, a mother of three. "They're saying it's offensive. To me, that's like saying I'm offensive because I exist."

Raymond said her landlord received an email from a member of the neighborhood's architectural review committee, saying only American, state or military flags may be flown.

When it was pointed out that the community bylaws don't mention flags, the member cited part of the "ground maintenance section," saying it was deemed offensive and detrimental to the subdivision.

"Allowing the flag to be flown is setting a precedence for other homeowners to fly other offensive flags -- for example, the Confederate flag," the email said.

Raymond said she was astonished by the email.

"The Confederacy supported slavery," she said. "(The rainbow flag is) a symbol of equality and acceptance of all."

Other flags were spotted in the subdivision, including one depicting a flower, a Florida Gators flag and a Thin Blue Line flag, which is flown in support of law enforcement officers.

Those homeowners said they've never been asked to remove their flags.

An HOA attorney said if bylaws don't specifically limit flags and other flags are allowed, that could be considered discrimination.

"I'm not asking you to agree with me," Raymond said. "I'm asking you to respect my rights the same as yours."

Another member of the committee, who's also an HOA board member, said he was unaware of the email. He said the member who wrote it doesn't speak on behalf of the HOA, and he said he'll look into the matter.

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