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Teen stunned to go from Chipotle dishwasher to high fashion model in 10 days

Published: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 @ 6:09 PM

Teen Goes From Dishwasher To High Fashion Model In 10 Days

It’s a Cinderella story for the ages.

On Aug. 10, 19-year-old Remington Williams was scrubbing dishes at a North Austin Chipotle restaurant when a modeling agency spotted her. The next thing she knew she was strutting down the catwalk at New York Fashion Week.

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When Tanni Foreman, owner of the Foreman Management agency asked if she’d be interested in becoming a model, Williams, a college student studying graphic design, was shocked. And intrigued.

Now, barely a month later, she’s walked runways for the likes of Calvin Klein and Marc Jacobs at New York Fashion Week, London Fashion Week, Milan Fashion Week and, currently, Paris Fashion Week.

Foreman was out to dinner with her husband and daughter at the Chipotle when she saw Williams in the back of the restaurant, “lugging around huge trays and washing dishes.”

“She’s wearing this Chipotle uniform — T-shirt, hat, pants,” Foreman said. “With me, when I see a potential model, I can tell really quickly, I can see in their face if they’ve got what it takes.”

After a quick chat during Williams’ lunch break, they arranged to meet the next day at Foreman’s company, Foreman Management, a “mother agency” that scouts talent and helps place models all over the world. For the next few days, Foreman said she walked Williams through the ins and outs of modeling and sent her photos to a high-profile agency called DNA Models, which replied that they wanted Williams to walk in New York Fashion Week.

Soon, Williams, who could not be reached for comment due to her busy travel schedule, was on a plane to the Big Apple. She walked her first runway as part of Calvin Klein’s show on Sept. 7. She walked for Marc Jacobs on Sept. 13.

“Normally the agencies have more time to develop the girls before Fashion Week and be gently introduced to the industry,” said Foreman, who spent time with Williams in both New York and London showing her the ropes. “She was kind of thrown into the madness of it.”

For now, Williams, who was dubbed by Vogue as “Fashion Week’s buzziest model,” seems to be embracing the madness. She posted a photo of herself on Instagram earlier this week with the Eiffel Tower in the background and the caption “Paris is the most magical place I’ve ever seen. I never want to leave!”

“She went from scrubbing pots at Chipotle to meeting designers at Fashion Week. Her work ethic is so strong, she’s grateful for everything,” Foreman said. “That’s my favorite part of this business. I love finding somebody and changing their life.”

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Police find alleged wrong-way semitrailer driver naked

Published: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 @ 11:54 PM

(FOX23.com)
(FOX23.com)

A man is in custody after police received reports of a semitrailer driving the wrong way down a street in Tulsa, Oklahoma and crashing into a vehicle.

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Police said they believe the semitrailer was traveling the wrong way on Skelly Drive on Tuesday evening.

They said the driver reportedly did not stop at red lights and crashed into a vehicle near 51st Street and Harvard Avenue. No one was injured, police said.

They believe the driver then headed to 81st Street and Riverside Parkway and walked away from the vehicle.

Police have not publicly identified the driver, but they found him naked in the area around 8 p.m.

He reportedly ran from the scene after police found him, but officers soon brought him back into custody.
Police believe he was using PCP. Officers said they were taking the suspect to an area hospital and then to jail.

He will face charges related to driving the wrong way and fleeing the scene of a crash.

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Veterans Day vs. Memorial Day: When is each, why is it celebrated?

Published: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 @ 11:17 PM

VIDEO: Military Memorials

If you’ve ever wondered what the difference is between Memorial Day and Veterans Day, apparently you’re not alone. No less an authority than the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs says people frequently confuse the two holidays.

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Make no mistake about it: Both are incredibly important holidays, with their common focus on Americans who’ve served in the military. The key distinction: Memorial Day “is a day for remembering and honoring military personnel who died in the service of their country, particularly those who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained in battle,” the VA says.

While Veterans Day also honors the dead, it is “the day set aside to thank and honor all those who served honorably in the military - in wartime or peacetime.”

Here’s a guide to each holiday:

MEMORIAL DAY

When it is: This year, it is on May 28.

Its original name: Decoration Day. Initially, it honored only those soldiers who’d died during the Civil War. In 1868, a veteran of the Union Army, General John A. Logan, decided to formalize a growing tradition of towns’ decorating veterans’ graves with flowers, by organizing a nationwide day of remembrance on May 30 (Logan also served in Congress from Illinois and in 1884, unsuccessfully ran for vice president on the Republican ticket). During World War I, the holiday’s focus expanded to honoring those lost during all U.S. wars.

When it became official: In 1968, Congress officially established Memorial Day (as it had gradually come to be known) as a federal holiday that always takes place on the last Monday in May.

Its unofficial designation: Memorial Day is still a solemn day of remembrance everywhere from Arlington National Cemetery to metro Atlanta, where a number of ceremonies and events will take place on Monday.   On a lighter note, though, many people view the arrival of the three-day weekend each year as the start of summer.

One more thing to know: In 2000, Congress established the National Moment of Remembrance. It asks all Americans to pause at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day each year to remember the dead.

VETERANS DAY

When it is: November 11 every year.

Its original name: Armistice Day. The “armistice” or agreement signed between the Allies and Germany that ended World War I called for the cessation of all hostilities to take effect at 11 a.m. on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of the year in 1918. One year later, on Nov. 11, 1919, the first Armistice Day was celebrated in the U.S. 

When it became official: In 1938, a Congressional act established Armistice Day as an annual legal holiday. In 1945, World War II veteran Raymond Weeks first proposed the idea of expanding the holiday to one honoring veterans of all U.S. wars. In 1954, the holiday legally became known as Veterans Day (In 1982, President Ronald Reagan presented Alabama resident Weeks with the Presidential Citizenship Medal in recognition of his efforts in creating Veterans Day).

Its temporary relocation: In 1968, the same Congressional act that established Memorial Day moved Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October every year. That law took effect in 1971; just four years later, in 1975, President Gerald Ford -- citing the original date’s “historic and patriotic significance” -- signed a bill that redesignated Nov. 11 as Veterans Day every year.

One more thing to know: Despite much confusion over the spelling, it’s Veterans Day, plural, and without any apostrophes. That’s according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, which explains on its web site: “Veterans Day does not include an apostrophe but does include an "s" at the end of ‘veterans’ because it is not a day that ‘belongs’ to veterans, it is a day for honoring all veterans.”

(File photo)

   

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Sunken treasure worth $17 billion on 300-year-old shipwreck discovered off Colombian coast 

Published: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 @ 10:54 PM

A photo of the bronze cannons belonging to the wreck of the Spanish galleon San José, which was discovered in 2015, but only now publicized by archaeologists. The bronze cannons, with their distinctive engraved dolphins, are a distinguishing feature of the San José.
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
A photo of the bronze cannons belonging to the wreck of the Spanish galleon San José, which was discovered in 2015, but only now publicized by archaeologists. The bronze cannons, with their distinctive engraved dolphins, are a distinguishing feature of the San José.(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Perhaps the “holy grail of shipwrecks” has been positively identified in the waters off Cartegena, Colombia, with a treasure of gold, silver and emeralds aboard valued at $17 billion. 

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The San José was a 62-gun Spanish galleon that went down in 1708 during a fierce battle with British ships in the War of Spanish Succession. It was the distinctive and ornate dolphins engraved on the ship’s cannons that helped identify her.

The wreck was first discovered in 2015 in 2,000 feet of water by a team of international scientists and engineers during an expedition aboard the Colombian Navy research ship ARC Malpelo

The Massachusetts-based Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, or WHOI, helped positively identify the ship, and was just given permission to talk about how it helped pinpoint the shipwreck using an autonomous underwater vehicle. 

The wreck was partially covered in sediment, but with the camera images from WHOI’s autonomous underwater vehcile, the crew was able to see new details, such as ceramics and other artifacts.(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

“The REMUS 6000 was the ideal tool for the job, since it’s capable of conducting long-duration missions over wide areas,” WHOI engineer and expedition leader Mike Purcell said in a statement.

The discovery of the legendary wreck is so significant, the Colombian government plans to build a museum dedicated to the San José and its contents, including cannons, ceramics and other artifacts, according to a WHOI statement.

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Congress delivers pair of bipartisan bills to Trump

Published: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 @ 10:35 PM

With the support of a few dozen Democrats, Congressional Republicans notched a pair of legislative victories for President Donald Trump on Tuesday in the U.S. House, giving final approval to a plan to roll back certain regulations on smaller banking institutions, as well as voting out a bill to help terminally-ill Americans seek new medicines and treatments.

Known as the “Right to Try” legislation, that measure would open new avenues to experimental drugs for those people who have found no cure for a life threatening disease or medical condition.

“As President Trump said in his State of the Union Address this year, every terminally-ill patient should have the right to try innovative drugs that could save their lives,” said Rep. Tom Graves (R-GA).

“Almost forty states have passed their own versions of this important legislation, and we look forward to addressing this at the Federal level,” the White House said in a statement.




“Americans deserve the chance to fight for their lives,” said Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), as he praised the plan which allows terminally-ill patients access to medicine that has been approved by federal regulators, but might not be available yet to the general public.

“Americans and their loved ones deserve the chance to fight for their lives,” Goodlatte added.

The “Right to Try” vote came just before the House approved another bill from the Senate, which eases some financial regulations enacted under the Dodd-Frank law, as 33 Democrats joined with Republicans to ease restrictions on smaller banks.



For Republicans, it was part of a pre-Memorial Day flurry of legislative advances, as the House also approved a prison reform bill backed by the White House.

Before leaving town on Thursday, the House is expected to approve a major defense policy bill, and may take another shot at voting on a farm policy measure – that bill failed last week in an internal GOP dispute over how best to deal with immigration legislation.

Both the defense and farm plans would still need action in the Senate.

Meanwhile, the Senate on Wednesday is expected to send the President another bill on veterans medical care; the Senate voted 91-4 on Tuesday to shut off debate on the measure.

“There is nothing less we need to ask of ourselves than to see to it they have the healthcare benefits we’ve promised veterans for so long,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA), as the bill would make a number of new changes in medical care efforts for veterans, which have been plagued by internal troubles for years.

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