School sues parents over damage caused by child

Published: Thursday, October 05, 2017 @ 9:21 AM

Oregon School Sues Parents Over Damage Caused by Child

A Salem, Oregon school district is taking parents of a student to court to have them pay for the thousands of dollars worth of damage he caused to a classroom.

Oregon Live reported that a student, who was 12 years old at the time, broke into a science classroom after school and poured hydrochloric acid in the room. He also poured sulfuric acid, iodine and food coloring in room 106, damaging floors, desks and computers, The Statesman Journal reported.  He allegedly caused about $19,000 worth of damage. School officials said it happened in June 2016.

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Salem-Keizer Public Schools is suing not only the student’s parents, but also the student himself, to recoup some of the money to repair the damages.

The district said in the suit that the mother and the boy’s stepfather failed to “exercise reasonable control” over the boy. The school said the boy had a dozen disciplinary cases over eight months while he was a student at Crossler Middle School. He had two issues that were described as behavioral episodes that needed calls home, Oregon Live reported.

There is a law on the books in Oregon that says that parents are liable for property damage done by their children, but the law limits the amount parents are held liable for to $7,500 or less than half than the total cost of the damage.  But there is no cap for students, so he could be forced to pay more than $11,000, The Statesman Journal reported.

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FBI releases declassified Carter Page FISA application

Published: Saturday, July 21, 2018 @ 7:04 PM

The Federal Bureau of Investigation on Saturday released a highly redacted copy of the application made by the bureau to a special intelligence court, asking to establish surveillance in the fall of 2016 on Carter Page, a one-time foreign policy adviser to President Donald Trump’s campaign, showing officials feared that Page was working with Russia to undermine the Presidential election.

“The FBI believes Page has been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian Government,” the document states – interrupted by redactions – but then continues, “undermine and influence the outcome of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election in violation of criminal law.”

The FBI released an unclassified version of the FISA application document after requests under the Freedom of Information Act.

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At one point, the 412 page document states that “the FBI believes that the Russian Government’s efforts are being coordinated with Page and perhaps other individuals associated with Candidate #1’s campaign.”

“Page has established relationships with Russian Government officials, including Russian intelligence officers,” the documents states, before additional evidence was redacted, in order to protect intelligence sources and classified information.

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11-year-old graduates Florida college 

Published: Saturday, July 21, 2018 @ 7:00 PM

File photo.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
File photo. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)(Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

When William Maillis was 2-years-old, he learned simple mathematical equations. At 4 he was on to algebra.

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He was declared a genius when he was 5 by an Ohio State University psychologist. At 9, he graduated high school.

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Maillis, now 11, turned the tassel on his mortarboard Saturday as he graduated with his associates degree from St. Petersburg College. He plans to start on his bachelor’s degree next month at the University of South Florida, the Tampa Bay Times reported

His goal is to have his Ph.D. at 18.

"I want to be an astrophysicist," Maillis told BayNews9. "I want to prove to the world that God does exist through science."

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Study: Doctors give patients only seconds to explain reason for visit before interrupting

Published: Saturday, July 21, 2018 @ 3:48 PM



Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
(Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Have you ever felt rushed during a doctor’s visit? Most physicians don’t give their patients adequate time to explain the reason for their visit, according to a new study. 

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Researchers from the University of Florida, Gainesville, recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, to explore clinical encounters between doctors and their patients.

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To do so, they assessed the initial few minutes of consultations between 112 patients and their medical practitioners between 2008 and 2015. The encounters they reviewed were videotaped in various clinics in the United States.

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The scientists observed whether doctors invited patients to set the agenda with questions such as “What can I do for you?” They also took notes on whether patients were interrupted while answering questions and in what manner.

After analyzing the results, they found that 36 percent of patients were able to set the agenda. However, they were interrupted 11 seconds on average after beginning their statements. Those who were not interrupted finished speaking after about six seconds. 

>> Medical errors kill almost as many as heart disease, doctors say

They said primary care doctors allowed more time than specialists as specialists generally know the purpose of a visit. 

“If done respectfully and with the patient’s best interest in mind, interruptions to the patient’s discourse may clarify or focus the conversation, and thus benefit patients,” co-author Singh Ospina said in a statement. “Yet, it seems rather unlikely that an interruption, even to clarify or focus, could be beneficial at the early stage in the encounter.”

>> Doctor burnout can cause major medical errors, study finds

While they are unclear why doctors don’t allow patients to speak longer, they believe time constraints, not enough training on how to communicate with patients and burnout may be factors. 

The scientists now hope to further explore their investigations on the ultimate experience of doctor visits and the outcomes. 

“Our results suggest that we are far from achieving patient-centered care,” she says. 

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World War II veteran awarded Prisoner of War medal after 73 years 

Published: Saturday, July 21, 2018 @ 5:50 PM

Ralph G. Rumsey (middle) was presented with a Prisoner of War Medal by U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson, on right, as his wife Ruby and other family and friends looked on. (Photo: U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson’s Office)
Ralph G. Rumsey (middle) was presented with a Prisoner of War Medal by U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson, on right, as his wife Ruby and other family and friends looked on. (Photo: U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson’s Office)

During World War II, Ralph G. Rumsey of Woodstock was a prisoner of war in Germany for six months. After struggling with his wartime experiences for 73 years, he’s been awarded a Prisoner of War Medal, gaining the recognition he thought might never come. 

At 96, Rumsey said he’s finally feeling some sense of closure.

He’s not satisfied yet, however; now, he wants to put the focus on other veterans.

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“I always wanted to be able to help veterans,” Rumsey said. He hopes to support other veterans in tackling the issues they face, particularly psychological issues.

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Rumsey himself has struggled for decades with feeling a horrible itching sensation that he believes was caused by his time as a prisoner, when his bed and clothes were filled with bugs.

Despite his vivid memories of the war, his family said he never talks about it. Until two years ago, no one in his family knew that Rumsey had been a prisoner of war, according to his wife Ruby.

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson helped Rumsey secure the medal, and Isakson presented it to him at a special ceremony for his friends and family.

One of Rumsey’s friends, Christine Maza, was crucial in helping Rumsey get the medal. She met him when she was a hospice volunteer several years ago, and one day while taking him to the VA, she noticed a poster advertising the medal.

“He was so excited,” she recalled. Maza helped him submit the paperwork, but when it stalled at the VA, she called Isakson’s office, remembering how he had helped her father, also a veteran. Isakson made it happen, she said.

“I’m just happy that Ralph is finally getting what is long overdue,” Maza continued. “He’s just been sinking. This really revived him.”

Rumsey’s stepdaughter, Jean Thomas, also believes that the medal will help Rumsey psychologically. “I’m so happy for him and pleased,” she commented.

At the ceremony, Rumsey was in high spirits, eager to share stories of his experiences in the war, both good and bad. Though he remembers the bug infestation in the prison clearly, he also recalled the way Paris lit up at night in; the days he spent there after he was released.

When Isakson walked into the room, Rumsey joked that Isakson was a “youngster” compared to him. 

With a laugh, Isakson agreed. “I’ve only been here 73 years, you’re 96!”

As Rumsey received the medal, many of his friends and family shed tears.

“Thank you for putting up with the Germans for a couple of months in captivity, but in the end, you won and they lost, and that’s all that matters,” Isakson told Rumsey.

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