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Remembering Pulse shooting victims: Who we lost in Orlando

Published: Monday, June 05, 2017 @ 10:42 PM
Updated: Monday, June 05, 2017 @ 10:42 PM

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - JUNE 13:  A woman lights a candle during a candlelight vigil for the victims of the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, at Oxford St on June 13, 2016 in Sydney, Australia. 50 people were killed and 53 injured after a gunman opened fire on people in a gay nightclub in Florida. It is the deadliest mass shooting in US history.  (Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images)
Daniel Munoz/Getty Images
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - JUNE 13: A woman lights a candle during a candlelight vigil for the victims of the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, at Oxford St on June 13, 2016 in Sydney, Australia. 50 people were killed and 53 injured after a gunman opened fire on people in a gay nightclub in Florida. It is the deadliest mass shooting in US history. (Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images)(Daniel Munoz/Getty Images)

On June 12, 2016 a gunman, identified by police as an American man named Omar Mateen, 29, opened fire at Pulse nightclub in Orlando Florida.

The rampage killed at least 49 people and injured 53.

Mateen was shot and killed by Orlando police following a standoff.

Here's what we know about those who lost their life that night:

     

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Gunmen followed family 80 miles from shopping center to rob them, police say

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 4:02 PM

Gunmen Followed Family 80 Miles To Rob Them

A woman said she was robbed at gunpoint in her own driveway after driving 80 miles home from a shopping trip.

Police believe the robbers may have followed her from the shopping center in Atlanta to her home in Dalton.

Brittany McEntire told WSB that two men robbed her at gunpoint about three weeks ago. Her mother, husband and three children were also in the driveway. 

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McEntire said the two men ran up the driveway and took her two Louis Vuitton diaper bags and demanded all of her jewelry, including her late father’s ring that she cherishes.

She said the whole robbery took less than a minute, but she has not regained her peace of mind.

“I could’ve lost my whole family if they had started shooting,” McEntire told WSB.

The suspects allegedly followed McEntire from Buckhead for about two hours in an unidentified white car, police said.

McEntire said she is unsure why she was targeted because she did not take home many bags from the store. 

“It was not a shopping spree,” McEntire said.

Police believe the men will try to follow and rob more people.

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Woman issues warning after venomous caterpillar sends teen son to ER

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 7:13 PM

Megalopyge opercularis in larval from. It's better known as the puss catepillar and is regarded as dangerous due to its venomous spines (File photo)
Megalopyge opercularis in larval from. It's better known as the puss catepillar and is regarded as dangerous due to its venomous spines (File photo)

A woman is warning parents after her teenage son ended up in the ER after he was stung by a venomous caterpillar. 

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Her Facebook post has been shared nearly half a million times. 

Andrea Pergola wrote that her son Logan was picking up tree branches in the yard at their home in Land O'Lakes, Florida, when something brushed up against his arm. He felt a sharp, stinging sensation and within minutes was dizzy, nauseated and in terrible pain. 

She rushed him to the hospital where he became more disoriented, the pain intensified and a rash spread up his arm.

"The pain was radiating from his wrist, up his arm and into his shoulder and chest," Pergola wrote. "The rash also spread up his entire arm and into his chest."

Doctors said the spotted rash represented dozens of stings -- well over 20 injection sites. 

Pergola says the caterpillar was from a Southern Flannel Moth. Her son recovered within a few hours, but Pergola is warning people to be aware of how dangerous the critters are. 

"He is a healthy, strong, young man and it knocked him out," she wrote. "I can't even imagine a small child or elderly person. Please research this caterpillar, be aware of it and make your kids aware of it."

According to the Austin-American Statesman, Southern Flannel Moth caterpillars are some of the most venomous caterpillars in North America. They are found from New Jersey to Texas, though mostly in Texas, Florida, and Louisiana. 

They commonly live in oak, oleander, and plum trees. Their venomous spines can cause burning pain, swelling, nausea and itching. 

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‘Are you dead, sir?’: Video shows ER doctor mocking, berating patient with anxiety

Published: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 1:48 PM

Video Shows ER Doctor Berating, Mocking Patient With Anxiety

A California hospital has permanently removed an emergency room doctor from its roster after she was caught on video mocking a man who was likely in withdrawal from his anxiety medication. 

Samuel Bardwell, 20, went to El Camino Hospital in Los Gatos June 11 after suffering a panic attack after basketball practice, his father, Donald Bardwell, told the San Francisco Chronicle. Donald Bardwell said his son takes Klonopin to control his anxiety, but had run out of the drug a few days before the incident.

Klonopin, a benzodiazepine, is used to treat anxiety and panic attacks, as well as seizure disorders, according to WebMD. A sudden stop to the medication can cause serious withdrawal symptoms, including seizures, shaking and stomach or muscle cramps, the website said. 

“He had a prescription waiting for him at the pharmacy, but couldn’t pick it up,” Donald Bardwell told the Chronicle. “He’s a student and he works. We didn’t know what the consequences of not taking the meds would be.”

Samuel Bardwell told CBS San Francisco that when he collapsed, he could not speak, was numb and was in pain. Bardwell, who ABC News reported is a newly-enrolled student athlete at West Valley College in Saratoga, was taken by ambulance to the emergency room.

That’s where Dr. Beth Keegstra was assigned to handle his care. 

Keegstra kept them waiting for more than three hours, then came into the room with a security guard, the Bardwells told CBS San Francisco. 

“I was just, like, ‘Why would there be security when I have done nothing wrong?’” Samuel Bardwell said

Father and son said that Keegstra accused the athlete of seeking drugs and tried to get him to leave.

“She said, ‘I know why you people are here, you people who come here for drugs,’” Donald Bardwell told the Chronicle. “I said, ‘What do you mean, you people?’”

That’s when he started recording the exchange with his cellphone. 

In the video, father and son are heard trying to explain Samuel Bardwell’s anxiety attacks.

“When he has these, he’s throwing up and going in and out of consciousness,” Donald Bardwell tells Keegstra. “I literally saw him go in and out of consciousness.”

“He is completely awake and alert right now,” Keegstra says.

Bardwell tells the doctor that if his son leaves the hospital, he will have another anxiety attack like the first because he was in the same shape as when they arrived. 

“I’m sorry sir, you are the least sick of all the people who are here, who are dying,” a visibly angry Keegstra tells Samuel Bardwell

She grabs his arm and tries to force him to sit up. 

“I can’t get up,” Samuel Bardwell says. 

“I am literally trying to help you sit up,” Keegstra says. 

“You’re helping me?” an incredulous Samuel Bardwell says.

He continues to tell the doctor that he cannot get up, at which point she asks if he wants hospital staff to wheel him home on the gurney.

“That’s not what I said,” Samuel Bardwell says. 

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Keegstra tells him that he just lifted his head with no problem, so he should be able to put his hands on the rails of the hospital bed and pull himself up. 

“I cannot do that,” Samuel Bardwell says. “I could not do it in the ambulance, I cannot do it now.”

“Yes, you can,” Keegstra says. 

He tells the doctor that he just tried to inhale and couldn’t.

Keegstra begins laughing.

“He can’t inhale. Wow. He must be dead,” Keegstra tells someone off camera before turning back to her patient. 

“Are you dead, sir?” Keegstra asks Samuel Bardwell. “I don’t understand. You are breathing just fine.”

Donald Bardwell steps in, telling her that his son’s breathing is labored, and Keegstra points to his vital signs, which she says show that his blood oxygen levels are normal. 

“This is not labored breathing,” she says. 

Keegstra and Donald Bardwell bicker back and forth about his son’s care, which the father says consisted of fluids and medication for his son’s pain and anxiety last time an anxiety attack landed him in the emergency room. 

“So, you need narcotics, is that what you need?” Keegstra asks Samuel Bardwell.

“Here we go,” he mutters. “I didn’t say narcotics, I just said pain reliever and anxiety medication, because I’m in pain and I have anxiety. I didn’t say nothing about narcotics.”

“And you just told me that this was not an anxiety attack. That this was something completely different,” Keegstra says. 

“If I could get up off this bed, I would,” Samuel Bardwell says.

“Yeah, you really should,” Keegstra says. “Because this is ridiculous.”

Keegstra tells the patient that she came in there wanting to help him, but that he kept changing his story. Samuel Bardwell says he told her the same thing the entire time 

“No. You have changed your story every (expletive) time,” Keegstra says

“Whoa,” Samuel Bardwell says.

“Yeah, that’s how (angry) you’ve gotten me, OK?” Keegstra says.

“I didn’t do anything,” he says.

“Yes, you did,” she responds.

The video ends with Keegstra’s angry instructions to a nurse in the room.

“Put and IV in him, give him a liter of fluid and we’ll get him out of here,” Keegstra says. “That’s what he says he needs. He’s obviously a doctor and he knows what he needs.”

Samuel Bardwell told CBS San Francisco that tests ultimately showed he was dehydrated. Besides the fluids, he was also eventually given medication for pain and anxiety. 

Donald Bardwell uploaded the video of Keegstra’s rant to Facebook early the next morning.

“This is how they treat black people in Los Gatos emergency room,” he wrote. “SMH (shaking my head). Everyone share this video. For the record, this is my son.”

Bardwell’s friends obliged, and the video soon went viral. As of Tuesday morning, it had been viewed more than five million times and shared more than 120,000 times. 

The younger Bardwell said he had a feeling things would go wrong when he spotted Keegstra talking to the security guard before they entered his room.

“I already knew from that point,” Samuel Bardwell told ABC News. “I said, ‘Please, Dad, can you please take out your phone? I need you to take out your phone now ‘cause I have a feeling something is gonna happen.”

Samuel Bardwell said he is considering legal action against Keegstra and the hospital. 

Officials at El Camino Hospital responded to the video Thursday, reaffirming the hospital’s commitment to patient care. 

“This week, a patient who visited the emergency department at our Los Gatos campus had an interaction with a physician whose demeanor was unprofessional and not the standard we require of all who provide care through El Camino Hospital,” hospital CEO Dan Woods said in the statement. “We have expressed our sincere apologies and are working directly with the patient on this matter. Please know that we take this matter very seriously and the contracted physician involved has been removed from the work schedule, pending further investigation.”

Woods updated the statement Friday to say that the contract company that provides the hospital’s emergency room services, Vituity (formerly California Emergency Physicians), had been asked to remove Keegstra permanently from the hospital’s roster. 

Donald Bardwell told the Chronicle that Keegstra treated his son like a drug addict.

“I guess she was so angry and assumed he was a druggie and had drugs in his system,” Bardwell said. “She thought she could talk to us any which way she wanted.”

Commenters on the video were mostly supportive, though some, like Keegstra, accused Samuel Bardwell of seeking narcotics.

Donald Bardwell addressed the “naysayers” in a separate Facebook post, in which he shared a response from someone who told him about benzodiazepine withdrawal. 

“It’s very serious and life-threatening, especially when physicians do not recognize it,” the person wrote. 

According to her LinkedIn profile, Keegstra has more than 20 years of experience as an emergency physician. In 2015, she started a GoFundMe page to raise money for a mission trip she said was to bring medical treatment to rural villages in Vietnam. 

Her LinkedIn bio states that she has been with California Emergency Physicians, which recently changed its name to Vituity, since 1997. 

Her employment status with Vituity following her suspension from El Camino Hospital was not immediately known. The Medical Board of California’s website shows that Keegstra, who graduated from medical school in 1987, has a clean record. 

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Non-drinkers have higher risk of death, cancer than those having 1 to 3 drinks a week, study finds

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 7:13 PM

A new study finds light drinkers, those having between one and three drinks a week, have a lower risk for cancer and death than non-drinkers.
Pixabay
A new study finds light drinkers, those having between one and three drinks a week, have a lower risk for cancer and death than non-drinkers.(Pixabay)

Drinking is associated with several health issues, including hypertension and liver disease. However, those who consume liquor may outlive those who don’t, according to a new report. 

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Researchers from Queen’s Belfast University in Northern Ireland recently conducted a study, published in in the journal PLOS Medicine, to explore mortality and cancer risks among drinkers and non-drinkers. 

To do so, they reviewed data from the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, which examined nearly 100,000 adults in America between 1993 and 2001.

The participants, aged 55 to 74, completed a diet history questionnaire, which listed their alcohol consumption, and were followed up with after about nine years. Analysts also took note of their cancer diagnoses from medical records. 

After analyzing the results, they found that the average lifetime alcohol intake for adults was about 1.78 drinks per week. At a closer look, they discovered that men drank about 4.02 drinks weekly and women drank about 0.80 weekly. 

>> Related: Even one drink per day can increase your risk of cancer, study warns

They revealed that heavy drinkers or those who have more than three drinks a day have the highest death and cancer risks. However, they found that a person’s combined risk of dying younger or developing cancer is lowest among light drinkers or those have one to three drinks a week.

In fact, light drinkers have a lower combined risk of overall mortality or cancer compared to those who never drink, their research revealed. 

“We had expected light drinkers to be at a similar combined risk to never drinkers, so the reduced risk in light drinkers was surprising,” coauthor Andrew Kunzmann told CNN. “The reasons for the reduced risk in light drinkers compared to never drinkers are still open to debate amongst the scientific community.”

The authors did point out a few limitations. They said they only assessed older adults. Plus, the information they received was self-reported, and they also did not factor in other risk factors for cancer. However, they believe their findings are still strong. 

>> Related: Non-drinkers more likely to miss work than moderate drinkers, study says

“This study,” the team wrote, “provides further insight into the complex relationship between alcohol consumption, cancer incidence, and disease mortality and may help inform public health guidelines.”

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