Police: Man angry over video game shoots, kills mom

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 3:05 PM

Man Shoots, Kills Mom Over Video Game

A California man is accused of shooting and killing his mother after becoming upset over a video game he was playing, police officials said. 

Matthew Douglas Nicholson, 28, of Ceres, is charged with murder and making a criminal threat, according to records from the Stanislaus County Jail. He is being held without bail. 

Officials with the Ceres Police Department reported that officers were called to Nicholson’s parents’ home shortly before 10 p.m. Thursday after his father called 911 to report the shooting. Nicholson’s mother, Lydia Susanne Nicholson, had been shot in the head.

The 68-year-old woman died of her injuries at a hospital. 

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Detectives determined that Matthew Nicholson was in his bedroom, playing video games, when he became enraged over the game he was playing and started yelling, police officials said. His mother went into his room to check on him, and the pair began arguing. 

Nicholson broke his game headset during the argument and blamed his mother, officials said. Threatening to kill his mother and father, he retrieved a handgun, police officials said.

After firing two shots into a wall, Nicholson turned the gun on his mother, according to investigators. 

He also tried to shoot his father, Loren Nicholson, who wrestled the gun away from him, a Ceres Police Department news release said. The 81-year-old was not injured in the scuffle. 

“I understand that he would’ve killed the father, too, but the gun jammed,” a family friend told Fox 40 in Sacramento. “The father grabbed the gun (and) emptied it.”

Matthew Nicholson fled and headed to his sister’s home, in nearby Riverbank, police officials said. Officers there located the vehicle he was driving and conducted a high-risk traffic stop.

Nicholson was taken into custody without incident, the news release said.   

His sister described their mother as a wonderful person who loved her children and husband of 32 years. Lydia Nicholson worked in the local school system, Autumn Nicholson told Fox 40

“(She) had so much compassion for people and just wanted to see the best in people at all times,” she said. 

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Reports: 1,500 immigrant children missing, feds say they’re not responsible

Published: Sunday, May 27, 2018 @ 1:20 PM

Feds Say 1,500 Immigrant Children Missing, They’re Not Responsible

The federal government has admitted that it does not know the whereabouts of almost 1,500 immigrant children in its custody, according to news reports.

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The Office of Refugee Resettlement took in some 40,000 immigrant children in 2017 and when the agency reached out to check on more than 7,000 of them between October and December of 2017, 1,475 were unaccounted for at the end of the year, CNN reported.

The news came as the Trump administration cracks down on undocumented immigrants, threatening to separate more children from their families if the families are caught entering the United States illegally, in a new policy move.

In testimony before Congress earlier this month, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Neilsen said the children of illegal immigrants are transferred to the Department of Health and Human Services within 48 hours after they are taken into custody, and DHHS officials then find sponsored homes for them, USA Today reported.

Nielsen said separations like this happen in the U.S. every day.

Top DHHS official Steven Wagner testified before a Congressional subcommittee last month during a hearing on the Office of Refugee Resettlement that the ORR was “was unable to determine with certainty the whereabouts of 1,475 children,” and that 28 more had run away, CNN reported.

“I understand that it has been HHS’ long-standing interpretation of the law that ORR is not legally responsible for the children after they are released from ORR care,” Wagner said. 

>> Related: Woman arrested for stealing a salad now facing deportation

Wagner also said DHHS is “taking a fresh look at that question,” according to CNN, but he also said ORR would need a lot more money if the office is expected to be legally responsible for unaccompanied immigrant children.

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Germany’s largest amusement park reopens after massive fire 

Published: Sunday, May 27, 2018 @ 8:00 PM

File photo. Europa-Park one of the biggest amusements Park in Europe celebrates his 40 Year anniversary. (Photo by Michele Tantussi/Getty Images)
Michele Tantussi/Getty Images
File photo. Europa-Park one of the biggest amusements Park in Europe celebrates his 40 Year anniversary. (Photo by Michele Tantussi/Getty Images)(Michele Tantussi/Getty Images)

There were no injuries among the thousands of people who evacuated from Germany’s largest amusement park after a fire ignited Saturday, destroying the Pirates of Batavia ride. 

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About 250 firefighters battled the blaze at Europa-Park into Sunday morning after the fire started in a warehouse, according to Sky News. Some firefighters suffered minor injuries and were all released from the hospital.

“A sad day for Europa-Park,” amusement park chief executive Michael Mack said on Twitter. “Thanks to all who help us to save our life's work! Can not express my feelings.”

Most of the park was reopened Sunday. The Dutch- and Scandinavian-themed sections of the park remain closed.

The park is the second-most popular in Europe, behind Disneyland Paris.

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Subtropical Storm Alberto strengthens bringing gusty winds, heavy rains, storm surge to Gulf region

Published: Sunday, May 27, 2018 @ 10:31 AM
Updated: Sunday, May 27, 2018 @ 10:31 AM

What are Tropical Storms?

Tropical storm warnings are up across Florida and along parts of the Gulf Coast as Subtropical Storm Alberto lumbers across the Gulf of Mexico ruining Memorial Day holiday plans for thousands of vacationers.

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Update May 27, 2018 5:05 p.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto continues to move north, north west with no change in strength.

The Tropical Storm Warning along the west coast of Florida south of the Anclote River has ended, according to the National Hurricane Center

The Storm Surge Warning for the northern Gulf Coast of west of Navarre, Florida has ended. 

Update May 27, 2018 11 a.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto is strengthening with wind speeds clocked at 50 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center, or NHC. The storm is moving north at 14 mph and it’s located about 130 miles southwest of Tampa.

Isolated tornadoes are possible as Alberto closes in on the region. Forecasters are predicting Alberto will make landfall sometime late Sunday or Monday, bringing gusty winds, heavy rain, flash flooding and storm surge to parts of the Gulf Coast.

>> Related: Alberto: PBC saw up to 3 inches of rain last night; expect more Sunday

“Alberto is expected to produce heavy rainfall with a risk of flooding and flash flooding over western Cuba, the Florida Keys and south Florida today. The risk for heavy rainfall and flooding will then spread over much of the southeast U.S. tonight and Monday,” according to the NHC.

The NHC is warning of “dangerous surf and rip current conditions” along parts of the eastern and northern Gulf Coast through Monday.

 

>> Related: Alberto starts to bring rain to Central Florida as storm moves north

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A tropical storm warning has been issued for parts of the Florida Gulf Coast including from Bonita Beach to the Anclote River as well as north near the Aucilla River to the Mississippi/Alabama border, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A tropical storm warning means tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

Heavy rainfall is expected as the storm, with sustained winds of 40 mph, continues to move at 13 mph through the Dry Tortugas. 

Five day forecast map. (Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

A storm surge watch has also been issued for parts of Florida and the Mississippi/Alabama border, officials said

The latest forecast ends the tropical storm and storm surge watch for parts of Louisiana. 

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Maryland rain-soaked, flash floods wash out Ellicott City

Published: Sunday, May 27, 2018 @ 6:55 PM

Flash flooding covers Rogers Avenue and Main Streets in Ellicott City, Md., Sunday, May 27, 2018. Flash flooding and water rescues are being reported in Maryland as heavy rain soaks much of the state. (Kenneth K. Lam/The Baltimore Sun via AP)
Kenneth K. Lam/AP
Flash flooding covers Rogers Avenue and Main Streets in Ellicott City, Md., Sunday, May 27, 2018. Flash flooding and water rescues are being reported in Maryland as heavy rain soaks much of the state. (Kenneth K. Lam/The Baltimore Sun via AP)(Kenneth K. Lam/AP)

Heavy rains soaking much of Maryland have led to flash flooding in parts of the state.

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Main Street in Ellicott City, which is just outside of Baltimore, was filled with rushing brown floodwater Sunday afternoon. 

A flash flood emergency was issued for Howard County at 4:40 p.m.

The city was still recovering from a devastating 2016 flood that left two people dead. 

Gov. Larry Hogan has issued a state of emergency and urged residents in flash flood warning areas to seek higher ground.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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