Here’s how your senator voted on reopening the government after the shutdown

Published: Monday, January 22, 2018 @ 1:35 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

The Senate on Monday passed a temporary spending bill to end the 3-day-old government shutdown at least through Feb. 8.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, (D-N.Y.), said his party would “vote today to reopen the government to continue negotiating" after he and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, (R-Kty.) made a deal to begin debating an immigration bill by Feb. 8 that included deciding the fate of the nearly 800,000 young immigrants involved in the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program.

Eighty-one Senators voted yes on the bill; 18 voted no. Of the 18 voting no, two were Republicans. Below is a list of senators and how they voted. 

Republican senators voting yes: 

Lamar Alexander - (Tenn.) 

John Barrasso - (Wy.) 

Blunt, Roy - (Mo.) 

Boozman, John - (Ark.) 

Burr, Richard - (N.C.) 

Capito, Shelley Moore - (W.Va.) 

Cassidy, Bill - (La.) 

Cochran, Thad - (Miss.) 

Collins, Susan M. - (Maine) 

Corker, Bob - (Tenn.) 

Cornyn, John - (Texas) 

Cotton, Tom - (Ark.) 

Crapo, Mike - (Idaho) 

Cruz, Ted - (Texas) 

Daines, Steve - (Mont.) 

Enzi, Michael B. - (Wy.) 

Ernst, Joni - (Iowa) 

Fischer, Deb - (Neb.) 

Flake, Jeff - (Ariz) .

Gardner, Cory - (Colo.) 

Graham, Lindsey - (S.C.) 

Grassley, Chuck - (Iowa)

Hatch, Orrin G. - (Utah)

Heller, Dean - (Nev.) 

Hoeven, John - (N.D.) 

Inhofe, James M. - (Okla.) 

Isakson, Johnny - (Ga.) 

Johnson, Ron - (Wisc.) 

Kennedy, John - (La.)

Lankford, James - (Okla). 

McCain, John - (Ariz.) – Did not vote

McConnell, Mitch - (Ky.) 

Moran, Jerry - (Kansas) 

Murkowski, Lisa - (Alaska) 

Perdue, David - (Ga.) 

Portman, Rob - (Ohio) 

Risch, James E. - (Idaho) 

Roberts, Pat - (Kansas)

Rounds, Mike - (S.D.) 

Rubio, Marco - (Fla.) 

Sasse, Ben - (Neb.) 

Scott, Tim - (S.C.) 

Shelby, Richard C. - (Ala.) 

Strange, Luther - (Ala.) 

Sullivan, Dan - (Alaska) 

Thune, John - (S.D.) 

Tillis, Thom - (N.D.)

Toomey, Patrick J. - (Penn.)

Wicker, Roger F. -- (Miss.)

Young, Todd - (Ind.) 

Republicans voting no:

Lee, Mike - (Utah) 

Paul, Rand - (Kty.) 

Democratic senators voting yes: 

Tammy Baldwin (Wisc.)

Michael Bennet (Colo.)

Sherrod Brown (Ohio)

Maria Cantwell (Wash.)

Ben Cardin (Md.)

Tom Carper (Del.)

Bob Casey (Pa.)

Chris Coons (Del.)

Joe Donnelly (Ind.)

Tammy Duckworth (Ill.)

Dick Durbin (Ill.)

Maggie Hassan (N.H.)

Martin Heinrich (N.M.)

Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.)

Tim Kaine (Va.)

Angus King (I-Maine)

Amy Klobuchar (Minn.)

Joe Manchin (W.V.)

Claire McCaskill (Mo.)

Patty Murray (Wash.)

Bill Nelson (Fla.)

Gary Peters (Mich.)

Jack Reed (R.I.)

Brian Schatz (Hawaii)

Chuck Schumer (N.Y.)

Jeanne Shaheen (N.H.)

Tina Smith (Minn.)

Debbie Stabenow (Mich.)

Tom Udall (N.M.)

Chris Van Hollen (Md.)

Mark Warner (Va.)

Sheldon Whitehouse (R.I.)

Democrats voting no: 

Richard Blumenthal (Conn.)

Cory Booker (N.J.)

Dianne Feinstein (Calif.)

Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.)

Kamala Harris (Calif.)

Mazie Hirono (Hawaii)

Patrick Leahy (Vt.)

Ed Markey (Mass.)

Catherine Cortez Masto (Nev.)

Bob Menendez (N.J.)

Jeff Merkley (Oregon)

Chris Murphy (Conn.)

Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)

Jon Tester (Mont.)

Elizabeth Warren (Mass.)

Ron Wyden (Oregon)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks back to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. Senate leaders have reached an agreement to advance a bill ending government shutdown.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Subtropical Storm Alberto expected to strengthen, tropical storm warning issued for Gulf Coast area

Published: Saturday, May 26, 2018 @ 5:50 PM

What is a Storm Surge

Subtropical Storm Alberto continues to strengthen as a tropical storm watch has been issued for parts of Florida, Alabama and Mississippi drenching Memorial Day weekend plans for much of the Gulf Coast. 

>> Read more trending news

A tropical storm warning has been issued for parts of the Florida Gulf Coast including from Bonita Beach to the Anclote River as well as north near the Aucilla River to the Mississippi/Alabama border, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A tropical storm warning means tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

Heavy rainfall is expected as the storm, with sustained winds of 40 mph, continues to move at 13 mph through the Dry Tortugas. 

Five day forecast map. (Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

A storm surge watch has also been issued for parts of Florida and the Mississippi/Alabama border, officials said

The latest forecast ends the tropical storm and storm surge watch for parts of Louisiana. 

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SPAM Recall: Hormel reports pieces of metal found inside some cans

Published: Saturday, May 26, 2018 @ 6:00 PM

Hormel Foods Corp. is recalling some of its 12-ounce SPAM Classic cans after reports consumers found metal pieces inside.

The products subject to recall have best by February 2021 dates and production codes: F020881, F020882, F020883, F020884, F020885, F020886, F020887, F020888 and F020889, according to a release on Saturday evening from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

RELATED: Recall Roundup: Strollers, bikes and phone chargers

The problem was discovered after Hormel received four consumer complaints about metal objects found in cans. There have been reports of minor oral injuries. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider, the USDA said.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Hormel Foods at 800-523-4635.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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North Korea’s Kim Jong Un, South Korean president meet Saturday in surprise visit to Demilitarized Zone

Published: Saturday, May 26, 2018 @ 11:33 AM

North and South Korean Leaders Meet in Surprise Visit

The leaders of North Korea and South Korea met for a second time in a surprise visit Saturday.

South Korean president Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reportedly discussed efforts to continue work on the peace declaration declared in April between the two countries.

They also affirmed a commitment to working on diplomacy talks between North Korea and the United States, after President Donald Trump announced he was canceling a summit between the two countries in Singapore. 

Update May 26, 8:13 a.m. EST: President Trump has tweeted in response to a New York Times report that there is dispute within the White House on how to address diplomacy talks with North Korea.

 

The White House announced on Saturday it will send an advance team to Singapore “in order to prepare should the summit take place,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement to NBC

Original story: South Korean president Moon Jae-in held the second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the demilitarized zone between the two countries, according to the Blue House, South Korea’s official media source.

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The two leaders discussed how to carry out the peace declaration agreed upon on April 27, which hopes to bring a new era of peace and denuclearization on the Korean peninsula. 

South Korean officials said that the two leaders also discussed the cancelled summit between the United States and North Korea. 

The two leaders concluded that direct communication between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is needed, and pledged to continue making efforts to work on relations, according to the Blue House

The meeting at the border truce village comes after Trump said the highly anticipated summit between the U.S. and North Korea may be back on.

Trump tweeted that if the summit does happen, it will likely take place June 12 in Singapore as originally planned. 

 
This is a developing story, check back for updates.

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Alan Bean, NASA Apollo moonwalker, dies at 86

Published: Saturday, May 26, 2018 @ 2:14 PM

Astronaut Alan Bean Dead at 86

NASA astronaut Alan Bean, the fourth person to walk on the moon, has died at the age of 86.

Bean’s family has released the following statement on NASA’s website:

Family Release Regarding the Passing of Apollo, Skylab Astronaut Alan Bean

The following is an obituary article released on the behalf of Alan Bean’s family:

Alan Bean, Apollo Moonwalker and Artist, Dies at 86

HOUSTON, Texas — Apollo and Skylab astronaut Alan Bean, the fourth human to walk on the moon and an accomplished artist, has died.

Bean, 86, died on Saturday, May 26, at Houston Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. His death followed his suddenly falling ill while on travel in Fort Wayne, Indiana two weeks before.

“Alan was the strongest and kindest man I ever knew. He was the love of my life and I miss him dearly,” said Leslie Bean, Alan Bean’s wife of 40 years. “A native Texan, Alan died peacefully in Houston surrounded by those who loved him.”

A test pilot in the U.S. Navy, Bean was one of 14 trainees selected by NASA for its third group of astronauts in October 1963. He flew twice into space, first as the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12, the second moon landing mission, in November 1969, and then as commander of the second crewed flight to the United States’ first space station, Skylab, in July 1973.

“Alan and I have been best friends for 55 years — ever since the day we became astronauts,” said Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7. “When I became head of the Skylab Branch of the Astronaut Office, we worked together and Alan eventually commanded the second Skylab mission.”

“We have never lived more than a couple of miles apart, even after we left NASA. And for years, Alan and I never missed a month where we did not have a cheeseburger together at Miller’s Cafe in Houston. We are accustomed to losing friends in our business but this is a tough one,” said Cunningham.

On Nov. 19, 1969, Bean, together with Apollo 12 commander Charles “Pete” Conrad, landed on the Ocean of Storms and became the fourth human to walk on the moon. During two moonwalks Bean helped deploy several surface experiments and installed the first nuclear-powered generator station on the moon to provide the power source. He and Conrad inspected a robotic Surveyor spacecraft and collected 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rocks and lunar soil for study back on Earth.

“Alan and Pete were extremely engaged in the planning for their exploration of the Surveyor III landing site in the Ocean of Storms and, particularly, in the enhanced field training activity that came with the success of Apollo 11. This commitment paid off with Alan's and Pete's collection of a fantastic suite of lunar samples, a scientific gift that keeps on giving today and in the future,” said Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 lunar module pilot and the only geologist to walk on the moon. “Their description of bright green concentrations of olivine (peridot) as ‘ginger ale bottle glass,’ however, gave geologists in Mission Control all a big laugh, as we knew exactly what they had discovered.”

“When Alan's third career as the artist of Apollo moved forward, he would call me to ask about some detail about lunar soil, color or equipment he wanted to have represented exactly in a painting. Other times, he wanted to discuss items in the description he was writing to go with a painting. His enthusiasm about space and art never waned. Alan Bean is one of the great renaissance men of his generation — engineer, fighter pilot, astronaut and artist,” said Schmitt.

Four years after Apollo 12, Bean commanded the second crew to live and work on board the Skylab orbital workshop. During the then-record-setting 59-day, 24.4 million-mile flight, Bean and his two crewmates generated 18 miles of computer tape during surveys of Earth’s resources and 76,000 photographs of the Sun to help scientists better understand its effects on the solar system.

In total, Bean logged 69 days, 15 hours and 45 minutes in space, including 31 hours and 31 minutes on the moon’s surface.

Bean retired from the Navy in 1975 and NASA in 1981. In the four decades since, he devoted his time to creating an artistic record of humanity’s first exploration of another world. His Apollo-themed paintings featured canvases textured with lunar boot prints and were made using acrylics embedded with small pieces of his moon dust-stained mission patches.

“Alan Bean was the most extraordinary person I ever met,” said astronaut Mike Massimino, who flew on two space shuttle missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope. “He was a one of a kind combination of technical achievement as an astronaut and artistic achievement as a painter.”

“But what was truly extraordinary was his deep caring for others and his willingness to inspire and teach by sharing his personal journey so openly. Anyone who had the opportunity to know Alan was a better person for it, and we were better astronauts by following his example. I am so grateful he was my mentor and friend, and I will miss him terribly. He was a great man and this is a great loss,” Massimino said.

Born March 15, 1932, in Wheeler, Texas, Bean received a Bachelor of Science degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Texas in 1955. He attended the Navy Test Pilot School and accumulated more than 5,500 hours of flying time in 27 different types of aircraft.

He is survived by his wife Leslie, a sister Paula Stott, and two children from a prior marriage, a daughter Amy Sue and son Clay.

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