Chelsea Clinton comes to Barron Trump’s defense after he was criticized for his clothing choices

Published: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 @ 9:30 PM

Chelsea Clinton Comes To The Defense Of Barron Trump

Chelsea Clinton is, once again, standing up for President Donald Trump’s 11-year-old son, Barron, after he was criticized for his clothing choices.

>> Read more trending news 

On Monday, the conservative website The Daily Caller published a story criticizing Barron for the fact that he doesn’t always dress up when he accompanies his parents.

The article’s author stated that, although he’s been “on the Barron Trump train” since the beginning, he thinks it’s time the first son started “dressing the part.”

Think about how many times your parents forced you to dress up when you were a kid for a special occasion. No matter how hard you resisted, it was inevitable, you weren’t leaving the house until you had your tie tied, your shirt tucked in nice and neat with your hair combed, and a blazer on.

That’s not how it goes for the president’s youngest child.

The article included pictures of Barron accompanying his parents from New Jersey to Washington, D.C., clad in a red T-shirt, khaki shorts and suede loafers.

Former first daughter Chelsea Clinton did not appreciate the author going after a child and expressed her displeasure on Twitter, writing in a tweet Monday night, “It’s high time the media & everyone leave Barron Trump alone & let him have the private childhood he deserves.”

This isn’t the first time Clinton has come to Barron’s defense. In January, Clinton defended the first son after people on social media started mocking him for the way he acted during his father’s inauguration.

Two days after the inauguration, she wrote in a tweet, “Barron Trump deserves the chance every child does-to be a kid. Standing up for every kid also means opposing @POTUS policies that hurt kids.”

Trending - Most Read Stories

Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, in labor with royal baby

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 3:51 AM
Updated: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 3:51 AM

Third Child Coming for Prince William, Kate Middleton

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, formerly known as Kate Middleton, was admitted to St. Mary’s Hospital in London and is in the “early stages of labor,” Kensington Palace tweeted Monday.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Police use anti-KKK law to arrest people protesting neo-Nazis

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 2:44 AM

Counterprotesters are held by law enforcement officers as the National Socialist Movement holds a rally at Greenville Street Park in downtown Newnan on Saturday, April 21, 2018. The far-right hate group also drew anti-fascist demonstrators as well as hundreds of police officers. (HYOSUB SHIN / AJC)
HYOSUB SHIN / AJC
Counterprotesters are held by law enforcement officers as the National Socialist Movement holds a rally at Greenville Street Park in downtown Newnan on Saturday, April 21, 2018. The far-right hate group also drew anti-fascist demonstrators as well as hundreds of police officers. (HYOSUB SHIN / AJC)(HYOSUB SHIN / AJC)

Faced with hundreds of demonstrators rallying against a crowd of neo-Nazis in Newnan, Georgia, authorities turned to a little-known Georgia law adopted in 1951 to combat the Ku Klux Klan.

>> Tension, arrests at neo-Nazi rally in metro Atlanta

The law, which makes it illegal to wear a mask at most public events, was cited in several of the arrests of counterdemonstrators who joined a protest Saturday against white supremacists.

And the irony was not lost upon the organizers of the counterdemonstration, who were fuming Sunday that a law aimed at weakening white supremacists was used to arrest protesters who opposed a neo-Nazi rally.

“They were trying to stop us, and we were trying to dial down the racist stuff,” said Jeremy Ortega, a 19-year-old who was among the counterprotesters charged with a misdemeanor for wearing a mask.

He said many of the demonstrators wore masks to avoid being identified and threatened by white power groups.

“We were peacefully protesting, yet they put guns in our faces and told us to take our masks off,” said Ortega, who added that he is considering filing a civil lawsuit. “It made no sense.”

State and local authorities did not comment on specific allegations of abuse on Sunday. But Georgia Bureau of Investigation Director Vernon Keenan said the overwhelming security – nearly 700 law enforcement officers were on hand – helped prevent the clashes from escalating.

“Making arrests in a volatile situation is never going to be pretty,” Keenan said.

No one from the white supremacist group was arrested on Saturday, and they largely avoided confrontations with police or the counterdemonstration group. The two dozen white supremacists who attended the rally were separated from the group by an 8-foot fence – and hundreds of armed officers.

‘Remove your mask’

On Sunday, a coalition of counterprotest groups planned a vigil at the Coweta County Jail to criticize what they said was excessive violence by police.

The Huffington Post reported that a contingent of officers approached a group of 50 counterdemonstrators before the rally and demanded they remove their masks or face arrests. The news outlet wrote that officers then “grabbed those who were still masked, tossing them to the ground and handcuffing them.”

A video posted on social media by freelance journalist Daniel Shular appeared to show authorities scuffling with counterdemonstrators. Authorities demanded that the counterprotesters remove their masks, and the footage showed an officer raising his rifle at demonstrators.

“Remove your mask, or you will be arrested,” said an officer in the video, which shows a ring of demonstrators standing with their hands raised aloft. Several are chanting “hands up, don’t shoot.”

A counterprotester kneels with his hands up in front of law enforcement officers during a neo-Nazi rally at Greenville Street Park in downtown Newnan on Saturday, April 21, 2018. (HYOSUB SHIN / AJC)(HYOSUB SHIN / AJC)

An Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter who attempted to report on the confrontation during the rally was obstructed by authorities.

Several other counterdemonstrators faced violations that have nothing to do with the anti-mask law.

Daniel Hanley was charged with obstruction of a pedestrian roadway after he said he nonviolently resisted a police officer who confronted him. He said he believes he was arrested because he was wielding a megaphone and leading chants against the white supremacists.

“They were trying to find any pretext to shut us down,” Hanley, 36, said of the authorities. “The moment we stepped foot there, they intimated us and strategically tried to target people.”

‘Absolutely satisfied’

State law bans the wearing of masks, hoods or other devices that conceal a person’s identity if they’re on public property or on private property where the owner has not consented. It includes exceptions for holidays, theatrical productions, civil emergencies and sporting events.

The laws have been adopted by about a dozen states, most aimed at weakening the KKK in the middle of the 20th century. The Georgia Supreme Court in 1990 upheld the state’s ban after a Klansman donned a hood on the Lawrenceville Square, citing his First Amendment rights.

The law has mostly been used to target KKK demonstrations, though it has also been employed before to arrest demonstrators who are objecting to white power groups. At a 2016 rally, the law was used to arrest eight demonstrators protesting a white supremacist rally at Stone Mountain Park.

Barricades and fencing are in place around a city park in Newnan as police prepared for Saturday's rally by a neo-Nazi group on Saturday, April 21, 2018. The neo-Nazis expected a turnout of 50 to 100, but only a couple dozen showed up. They were well outnumbered by counterprotesters and law enforcement officers. (HYOSUB SHIN / AJC)(HYOSUB SHIN / AJC)

In a strange turn, it also was invoked ahead of a press conference last year at the Gold Dome, when supporters of Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle threatened to hire performers in circus masks to interrupt a rival’s event. The clowns never showed up.

>> Read more trending news 

Authorities said they were intent on enforcing that law and others as they studied how law enforcement officials handled white supremacist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017 to prepare for the Newnan event.

In Charlottesville, officers remained largely passive as bloody clashes raged around them, and the event soon spiraled out of control. One person was killed and dozens more were injured in the violence.

“You have to have adequate resources and the intent to enforce the law,” Keenan said. “We had both.”

He said officers made clear to both groups that masks and some weapons were not allowed. He said authorities found an abandoned backpack with smoke bombs at one checkpoint. State law allows demonstrators to carry firearms if they are licensed; on Saturday, several were spotted sporting firearms.

“We maintained security. We would not let there be disorder. We didn’t have civil disorder, property damage. And we had just a few arrests,” Keenan said. “We are absolutely satisfied.”

MORE COVERAGE FROM AJC.COM: 

>> Reports from Newnan as the rally and counterprotest were underway

>> How social media reacted

Trending - Most Read Stories

Missing brothers found: Pittsburgh police locate 2 boys who disappeared Friday

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 2:04 AM
Updated: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 2:04 AM

Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, went missing about 5 p.m. Friday. (Photo via Pittsburgh police)
Pittsburgh police
Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, went missing about 5 p.m. Friday. (Photo via Pittsburgh police)(Pittsburgh police)

UPDATE, 10 a.m. April 22: The two brothers who went missing Friday have been found, police said. 

Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, have been located. Pittsburgh police thanked all involved for their assistance in finding the boys. 

ORIGINAL STORY: Pittsburgh police are seeking assistance in finding two brothers

>> Watch the news report here

Police said Amier Windsor, 12, and Robert Windsor Jr., 11, went missing about 5 p.m. Friday.

>> Read more trending news 

According to a news release, the two brothers are known to frequent the Brookline area. 

Anyone with information regarding their whereabouts is asked to call police at 412-323-7800

Related

Trending - Most Read Stories

Where is Travis Reinking? Search continues for Waffle House shooting suspect

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 1:25 AM

Waffle House Shooting: Who is Travis Reinking

A massive hunt to capture the man wanted in connection with the shooting deaths of four people at a Waffle House in Antioch, Tennessee, outside Nashville, continues.

>> Watch the news report here

>> Waffle House shooting: 4 dead after nude gunman opens fire in Tennessee; victims identified

Travis Reinking, 29, is now on the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top 10 Most Wanted List, and law enforcement said he is armed, dangerous and hiding, WHBQ's Greg Coy reports

>> Who is Travis Reinking, the person of interest in the Waffle House shooting?

Police said Reinking returned to his apartment after opening fire at the Waffle House. Reinking, who reportedly was nude at the time of the shooting, put on pants and then ran into the woods, police said.

>> Waffle House 'hero' disarmed shooter, tossed rifle over counter

Neighbor Johnny Green said another neighbor noticed Reinking and called police. 

>> Who is James Shaw Jr., the man who disarmed the Waffle House shooter?

"My mom saw him," Green added. Coy asked, "What did she say about him?" "He just seemed weird," Green replied

>> Read more trending news 

Police said they hope the rain and cooler temperatures will draw Reinking out of hiding. Police said Reinking's options are limited because the crime and social media attention have made him an international fugitive.

Trending - Most Read Stories