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Anti-abortion-rights activist found in contempt over videos

Published: Monday, July 17, 2017 @ 5:13 PM
Updated: Monday, July 17, 2017 @ 5:13 PM


            FILE - In this April 29, 2016, file photo, David Robert Daleiden, right, with attorney Jared Woodfill leave a courtroom after a hearing in Houston. A federal judge found the anti-abortion activist, known for clandestine videos of abortion-rights advocates, in contempt on Monday, July 17, 2017, after additional secretly-taken recordings appeared online. U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick said Daleiden, a leader of the anti-abortion Center for Medical Progress, had violated the judge's injunction against releasing additional videos. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)
FILE - In this April 29, 2016, file photo, David Robert Daleiden, right, with attorney Jared Woodfill leave a courtroom after a hearing in Houston. A federal judge found the anti-abortion activist, known for clandestine videos of abortion-rights advocates, in contempt on Monday, July 17, 2017, after additional secretly-taken recordings appeared online. U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick said Daleiden, a leader of the anti-abortion Center for Medical Progress, had violated the judge's injunction against releasing additional videos. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)

A federal judge found an anti-abortion activist known for clandestine videos of abortion-rights advocates in contempt on Monday after additional secretly-taken recordings appeared online.

U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick said David Daleiden, a leader of the anti-abortion Center for Medical Progress, had violated the judge's injunction against releasing additional videos.

Orrick ruled Daleiden's lawyers, former Los Angeles prosecutor Steve Cooley and Brentford Ferreira, had also violated his injunction. Ferreira said Monday they would appeal the judge's contempt ruling.

In 2015, Daleiden's center released secretly recorded videos that it says show Planned Parenthood employees selling fetal tissue for profit, which is illegal. Planned Parenthood said the videos were deceptively edited.

The videos stoked the U.S. abortion debate when they were released.

The center is also behind secret recordings at meetings of an abortion providers' group, the National Abortion Federation, in 2014 and 2015. Orrick blocked the release of those videos, but publicly accessible links that led to at least some of the blocked videos appeared on Cooley and Ferreira's website in May.

Cooley and Ferreira represent Daleiden in a related criminal case in California accusing him of recording people without their permission in violation of state law. Ferreira on Monday called the federal judge's contempt order "an unprecedented infringement on a state criminal case."

Orrick said in Monday's order he would hold Daleiden and the two lawyers responsible for extra security and attorney costs run up by the National Abortion Federation in response to release of the additional videos. The final financial penalty in the ruling has yet to be tallied.

Matthew Geragos, an attorney for Cooley and Ferreira, has said the attorneys were entitled to put out evidence that could draw out witnesses and other information that could clear Daleiden in the criminal case.

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McDonald’s phasing out plastic straws at UK locations

Published: Saturday, April 07, 2018 @ 10:28 PM

File photo. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
File photo. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)(Mario Tama/Getty Images)

McDonald’s is phasing out the use of plastic straws at its 1,300 locations in the United Kingdom, according to Sky News.

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Straws will only be available upon request, and restaurants also will start using paper straws in May. 

"Straws are one of those things that people feel passionately about, and rightly so, and we're moving those straws behind the front counter. If you come into McDonald's going forward, you'll be asked if you want a straw,” chief executive Paul Pomroy told Sky News. “The other thing we're looking to do is to move to recycled paper on the straws and biodegradable paper straws and that test, I'm really proud to say, will start next month."

Almost all the restaurant’s packaging is recyclable. 

"We've been on a journey over the past 10 years with recycling, from taking out foam and polystyrene to where we are now -- with Big Mac 'clam' boxes that are made with recycled board,” Pomroy said. “The only thing left for us to move forward on are the lids that go on to our cups. Those are complicated, but we're working with our suppliers to find a solution to that. We're really close, so we hope within the next year to be able to have a lid that's recyclable and serves the same purpose -- for hot and cold drinks.”

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McDonald’s premieres new fresh beef Quarter Pounder 

Published: Tuesday, March 06, 2018 @ 5:18 PM

McDonald's has switched to cooked-to-order fresh beef in its quarter-pound burgers and Signature Crafted Recipe burgers.
McDonald's
McDonald's has switched to cooked-to-order fresh beef in its quarter-pound burgers and Signature Crafted Recipe burgers.(McDonald's)

If your Quarter Pounder tastes different starting today or takes longer to be prepared, there’s a reason for that.

Atlanta is one of the eight places in the country where McDonald’s has rolled out its overhauled burger.

According to a Tuesday news release, the chain said that burger will be made with beef that isn’t frozen and the patties won’t be cooked before you order them.

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The restaurant announced a move toward fresher meat in March 2017. To make the change viable, refrigeration equipment had to be added to stores.

“All McDonald’s fresh beef quarter-pound burgers use 100 percent beef with absolutely no fillers, additives or preservatives,” the release said.

McDonald's has switched to cooked-to-order fresh beef in its quarter-pound burgers and Signature Crafted Recipe burgers.(McDonald's)

“Over the past two years, we have been listening to our customers and evolving our business to build a better McDonald’s,” McDonald’s USA President Chris Kempczinski said in the release. “We are proud to bring our customers a hotter and juicier quarter-pound burger at the speed and convenience they expect from us.”

The national roll out includes 3,500 locations in Charlotte, North Carolina, Memphis, Tennessee, Miami, Nashville, Tennessee, Orlando, Florida, Raleigh, North Carolina, and Salt Lake City.

These changes also apply to the fast-food chain’s Signature Crafted Recipe selections.

The release said the switch is expected to come to the rest of the contiguous United States by early May.

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McDonald’s promotion: You want free fries with that?

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 12:13 PM

Study Shows McDonald's Fries May Cure Hair Loss

If you’re craving free McDonald’s fries, today is the day. McDonald’s is offering free fries for customers today and next Friday, WGN reported.

If customers use the Mobile Order & Pay app, they can choose to participate in Free Fries Friday, according to the company website.

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There’s a catch, of course. Customers have to buy at least $1 worth of food, for the free medium fry. They can also only use the free fry deal once each week at a participating McDonald’s, the website’s fine print states.

Free fries aren’t the only deal being offered. The site also says customers can get a free medium McCafé with a $1 purchase and $2 off a signature crafted sandwich once a week for most of April.

For more on the deals, click here.

FILE PHOTO: French fries sit on a table at a McDonald's restaurant.(Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Democratic Party sues Trump Campaign, Wikileaks, others, over 2016 elections

Published: Friday, April 20, 2018 @ 11:56 AM

The legal fight over the 2016 elections expanded further on Friday, as the Democratic National Committee filed a wide-ranging lawsuit against President Donald Trump’s campaign, top aides, one of Mr. Trump’s son, as well as his son-in-law, the Russian government, and others caught up in the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 race for the White House.

The 66 page lawsuit, filed in the Southern District of New York, where an FBI raid recently took place on the President’s personal lawyer, alleges a broad conspiracy involving Russia, its intelligence service, and members of the Trump inner circle, like former campaign manager Paul Manafort.

“No one is above the law,” the lawsuit begins. “In the Trump Campaign, Russia found a willing and active partner in this effort.”

The charges cover everything from racketeering, conspiracy, computer fraud, trespass, and more, claiming the hacking effort was a coordinated effort with the Trump Campaign, designed to damage the bid of Hillary Clinton for the White House.

Along with the Russian government and intelligence service known as the GRU, the Democratic lawsuit names Julian Assange and Wikileaks, the Trump Campaign, Donald Trump, Jr., Paul Manafort, Roger Stone, Jared Kushner, and two campaign aides who have already agreed to help the Russia investigation, George Papadopoulos and Richard Gates.




The document did not seem to make public any brand new details about how the hacking occurred at the DNC or with members of the Clinton campaign.

In the lawsuit, Democrats charge “Russia’s cyberattack on the DNC began only weeks after Trump announced his candidacy for President,” in June 2015.

“In April 2016, another set of Russian intelligence agents successfully hacked into the DNC, saying that “massive amounts of data” were taken from DNC servers.

The lawsuit makes no mention of the FBI warning to the DNC that it was being hacked, and how that was ignored for weeks by officials at DNC headquarters in Washington.

If the lawsuit actually goes forward, it would not only involve evidence being gathered from those being challenged by the Democrats – but some made clear it could open the DNC hacking response to a further review as well in terms of discovery.


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