Alberto weakens to subtropical depression

Published: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 @ 5:01 AM
Updated: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 @ 5:01 AM

What are Tropical Storms?

Subtropical Storm Alberto has been downgraded to a depression after making landfall Monday afternoon in the Florida Panhandle in Laguna Beach.

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Millions of people in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi were under a state of emergency as Alberto lumbered ashore ruining Memorial Day holiday plans across the region.

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Forecasters warned the storm could bring gusty winds, heavy rains, flash flooding and intense storm surge.

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--Update May 29, 2018-- 

5 a.m. EDT: The center of Subtropical Depression Alberto is moving through central Alabama with maximum sustained winds of 30 mph. The storm is moving north-northwest at 13 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

“The system is expected to degenerate into a remnant low by Tuesday evening,” the center said.

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--Update May 28, 2018-- 

11:30 p.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto has been downgraded to a depression.

The storm is moving north at 12 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

It’s maximum sustained winds were clocked at 35 mph.

10 p.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto is moving north at 10 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The storm’s maximum sustained winds have decreased to 40 mph after is blew ashore Monday afternoon in Laguna Beach in Florida’s Panhandle.

Millions of people across three states are still under a state of emergency.

5 p.m. EDT: The storm was moving north at 9 mph with sustained winds of 45 mph.

The center of Subtropical Storm Alberto came ashore in Laguna Beach, according to the National Hurricane Center. Parts of the Southeast will see remnants from Alberto across the region for the next several days, according to the NHC.

2 p.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto is approximately 30 miles SSW of Panama City, Florida, according to the latest National Hurricane Center news advisory.

The storm now has maximum sustained winds of 50 mph.

Landfall is still expected by late afternoon or early evening.

11:00 a.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto is approximately 50 miles south of Panama City, Florida, the National Hurricane Center reported in its latest public advisory. The center of the storm is nearing the coast of the Florida panhandle, with rain bands and gusty winds spreading onshore. Alberto has maximum sustained winds of 60 mph.

Landfall is still expected by late afternoon or early evening. 

8:00 a.m EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto is about 75 miles SW from Apalachicola, Florida. The storm has slowed down but expected to make landfall later Monday. 

Alberto has maximum sustained winds of 65 mph and is moving at approximately 6 mph.

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A storm surge watch is in effect for Suwannee River to Navarre, Florida and there is a tropical storm warning in effect for Suwannee River to the Mississippi/Alabama border.

--End of Update--

Isolated tornadoes are possible as Alberto closes in on the region. Forecasters are predicting Alberto will bring gusty winds, heavy rain, flash flooding and storm surge to parts of the Gulf Coast.

“Alberto is expected to produce heavy rainfall with a risk of flooding and flash flooding over western Cuba, the Florida Keys and south Florida today. The risk for heavy rainfall and flooding will then spread over much of the southeast U.S. tonight and Monday,” according to the NHC.

The NHC is warning of “dangerous surf and rip current conditions” along parts of the eastern and northern Gulf Coast through Monday.

>> Related: Alberto starts to bring rain to Central Florida as storm moves north

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A tropical storm warning has been issued for parts of the Florida Gulf Coast including from Bonita Beach to the Anclote River as well as north near the Aucilla River to the Mississippi/Alabama border, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A tropical storm warning means tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

Heavy rainfall is expected as the storm, with sustained winds of 40 mph, continues to move at 13 mph through the Dry Tortugas. 

Five day forecast map. (Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

A storm surge watch has also been issued for parts of Florida and the Mississippi/Alabama border, officials said

The latest forecast ends the tropical storm and storm surge watch for parts of Louisiana. 

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