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Rep. Jordan: Trump wants military parade because he loves the troops

Published: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 @ 10:11 AM
Updated: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 @ 10:53 AM

President Trump wants to have a military parade

Local Congressman Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, said President Donald Trump wants to have a military parade because “he loves our military.”

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The United States hasn’t had a military themed parade since the end of the Gulf War in 1991.

“I wish every American could spend some time with him, and you would see how much he loves our men and women in uniform, how much he loves this great country, how much he loves our military,” Jordan made the comments during an interview with Chris Cuomo on CNN.

“Whether we need a parade or not, I’ll leave that up to the commander in chief,” Jordan said.

Trump has asked the Pentagon to plan a grand parade of the U.S. armed forces in Washington this year to celebrate military strength, officials said Tuesday.

The Washington Post, which was first to report the plan, said Trump wants an elaborate parade this year with soldiers marching and tanks rolling, but no date has been selected.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed the request Tuesday evening. She said Trump wants the Pentagon to “explore a celebration” that will allow Americans to show appreciation for the military.

A Pentagon spokesman, Charlie Summers, said Pentagon officials are aware of the request and are “looking at options.”

Muscular military parades of the kind that are common in authoritarian countries like China and North Korea are not quintessentially American. The U.S. traditionally has not embraced showy displays of raw military power, such as North Korea’s parading of ballistic missiles as a claim of international prestige and influence.

U.S. military members commonly participate in parades on the Fourth of July and other holidays to mark appreciation and remembrance of military veterans, but these typically do not include gaudy displays of military hardware.

In her brief comment on Trump’s order to the Pentagon, Sanders did not elaborate on what sort of event he envisions.

Although Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has not commented publicly on the idea of a Washington military parade, the idea is not an obvious fit with his emphasis on focusing strictly, if not exclusively, on military activities that either improve the lethality of the armed forces or enhance their preparation for combat, or both.

The Post report said a Jan. 18 meeting between Trump, Mattis and top generals at the Pentagon marked a tipping point in Trump’s push for a parade. It quoted an unidentified military official as saying, “The marching orders were: I want a parade like the one in France.” It was thus interpreted as a presidential order, the Post said, adding that the cost of shipping tanks and other military hardware to Washington could run in the millions of dollars.

The Post also reported that the Pentagon would prefer to hold such a parade on Veteran’s Day in November, in part because it would coincide with the 100th anniversary of the victorious end of World War I. It would thus be less directly associated with the president and politics, the Post said.

John Kirby, a retired Navy rear admiral and former spokesman for the State Department and the Pentagon, reposted on Twitter Tuesday night an article he wrote for CNN’s website last summer after Trump mentioned he had been dazzled by the Paris parade. Kirby said a big military parade in Washington is a bad idea.

“First of all, the United States doesn’t need a parade down Pennsylvania or any other avenue to show our military strength,” he wrote. “We do that every day in virtually every clime all over the world.”

It has long been conventional wisdom that the U.S. does not need to boast of its military strength because it already is recognized as the leader of the NATO alliance and a model of military professionalism that countries across the global seek to emulate.

Last September, at a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron, Trump announced his idea of staging a grand parade of the armed forces in Washington on July 4.

Trump reminisced about watching France’s Bastille Day military parade when he visited Paris in July. He said the two-hour parade was a “tremendous thing for France and for the spirit of France,” and said he wanted one on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington that would be grander than the one he saw in Paris.

AP national security writer Robert Burns contributed to this report.

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Democrats try to seize on jump in gasoline prices

Published: Saturday, May 26, 2018 @ 4:07 PM

While the Trump Administration has hailed economic and job gains over the past year and a half, the price of gasoline has jumped sharply in recent months for consumers and businesses, adding to the cost of everything from a daily commute, to a summer vacation, and the amount of money companies pay to ship their products around the country.

And it’s starting to used by Democrats on Capitol Hill to take aim at the White House.

“Gas prices have risen more than 25% since Trump took office,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR).

“Overall world crude oil prices have increased over 75 percent in the past year,” said Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA), as Democrats wrote President Donald Trump a letter earlier this week, asking him to do something about the rising cost of gasoline .

Those numbers at the pump aren’t unusual for the Washington, D.C. area as just the ohter day, this reporter filled up on the way to work, and ha the pump shut off before the tank was full, when the total hit the $50 credit card limit at that station for a single transaction.

Figures released in recent weeks by the Trump Administration clearly show the increase, with gas prices up on average by over 52 cents a gallon from the same time a year ago, at an average of $2.92 per gallon.



The $2.92 per gallon is the highest average price at the pump on Memorial Day in four years – in 2014, gas was at an average of $3.67 per gallon, as Republicans blamed the energy policies of the Obama Administration, arguing for more oil exploration in the United States.

Gas prices generally trended down the last few years, leading President Trump to proclaim where they stood on July Fourth of last year.

But since that tweet on July Fourth of last year, the price of gasoline has only gone up, and federal energy experts expect even more in the months ahead.

“Relatively higher crude oil spot prices, higher gasoline demand, and falling gasoline inventories are all factors contributing to higher gasoline prices,” the Energy Information Administration reported last week.

The EIA predicted an average of $2.90 per gallon for gasoline this summer.

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VA may expand private health care choices for veterans

Published: Friday, May 25, 2018 @ 2:55 PM
Updated: Friday, May 25, 2018 @ 2:59 PM

Rob Portman on VA MIssion Act

Veterans will have expanded private health care options under legislation passed by Congress, but some critics contend it could lead to more privatization of VA services.

The measure was part of a sweeping $51 billion VA bill that would institute reforms within the federal agency.

The Senate passed the measure in 92-5 vote this week, which continued funding of the VA Choice program due to be out of money as early as next week. President Donald Trump was expected to sign the bill before Memorial Day.

U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, who backed the legislation, said in a Friday interview in Dayton with this news outlet he heard “spirited” complaints about VA health care in town halls throughout Ohio.

Veterans’ stories about VA health care have “gotten better” since then, but the senator still hears a common complaint.

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“The problem I keep hearing about is, look I need to get a specialist in my community. I don’t want to drive from here to Cleveland or here to Cincinnati even. Why can’t I go to somebody here locally?”

The VA legislation will ease that issue with private health care options, he said.

“It says we’re going to help veterans get the care that they need where they want to get it at their convenience,” he said.

The legislation will eliminate the requirement veterans must wait at least 30 days or travel more than 40 miles to qualify for a private health care appointment, according to John W. Palmer, a spokesman with the Ohio Hospital Association in Columbus.

“We believe this is going to create stronger opportunities for access to care,” he said. “From a health care access standpoint, we definitely are equipped to handle patients that are coming in.”

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio(Washington Bureau)

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio and a member of the Senate Veterans Committee, voted for the legislation, but said he opposes any privatization meaures.

“Privatization means putting profits ahead of those who served our country, and I will fight any effort to use America’s veterans to line the pockets of wealthy corporations,” he said in an email. “Instead, we must all work together to strengthen and improve VA to better serve veterans.”

The bill also includes provisions to strengthen the VA workforce and make it easier to hire and retain more medical professionals, said Brown spokeswoman Jenny Donohue. His office said the bill streamlines, but does not expand private health care choices.

U.S. Rep. Mike Turner, R-Dayton, voted for the legislation in the House.

“This bill preserves our commitment to quality of care of veterans at facilities like the Dayton VA, puts the needs of veterans first, and ensures our veterans’ service is honored,” he said in a statement.

The Dayton VA has spent $55 million on private health care for nearly 17,700 veterans authorizations in fiscal year 2018, according to spokesman Ted Froats.

Among changes, the legislation will expand caregiver benefits to veterans who served before Sept. 11, 2001; puts tighter practices on prescribing opioids to VA patients from private providers; and sets up a presidentially appointed commission to review under performing VA facilities for possible closure, among a list of changes. Dozens of veterans service groups, such as the Veterans of Foreign Wars, supported the bill.

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The American Federal of Government Employees, which represents 260,000 federal VA employees, has had sweeping concerns with the wide-ranging bill.

The labor union says it could lead to outsourcing or the “amputation” of 36 health care specialties, such a primary care or mental health, outside the VA and force veterans into private health care if their VA facility is closed. The legislation would allow unrestricted use of private walk-in clinics and billions of dollars to be taken out of VA health care without federal data on how contractors spend the money, said Marilyn Park, an AFGE legislative assistant.

“We made a promise to veterans when they signed up to serve that they would be taken care of when they got home – not forced to wait in longer lines at private, walk-in clinics,” AFGE National VA Council President Alma Lee said in a statement.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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Trump Administration searches for way forward on North Korea

Published: Friday, May 25, 2018 @ 4:05 PM

A day after President Donald Trump scrapped a planned June 12 summit with Kim Jong Un, the President, White House, and State Department made clear that U.S. officials continue to be open to further contacts with their North Korean counterparts, seeing if there is a way to get talks back on track to rein in the nuclear weapons program of the Pyongyang regime.

“We always knew there would be twists and turns leading up to this meeting on June 12,” said State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert.

“We never expected it to be easy, so none of this comes as a surprise to us,” Nauert added.

On Friday afternoon, officials said that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had spoken by phone with the South Korean Foreign Minister, to discuss what the next steps might be – after the June 12 Trump summit with Kim Jong Un was cancelled.

Earlier in the day, the President expressed hope that talks could resume on the effort to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula, as allies of Mr. Trump argued he made the right move in walking away from the summit at this point in time.

“I don’t know where we will meet, when we will meet, or even if we will meet…..but I do believe President Trump is going to end the North Korean nuclear program,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC).

But as Graham and others acknowledged on Friday, it wasn’t clear whether progress might be made, or how.

From both the U.S. side, and the North Korean side, there was no resumption on Friday of some of the more bellicose rhetoric that had marked the long distance relationship between Mr. Trump and Kim Jong Un, as Pyongyang officials said they were open to further talks and the President said he was not giving up.

“Everybody plays games,” the President told reporters in talking about the art of negotiation.

“We weren’t getting the right signals previously, so hopefully we will in the future,” Nauert told the White House Pool reporter, as President Trump gave the commencement address at the Naval Academy on Friday.

“But we didn’t want to go to a meeting just for the sake of going to a meeting,” Nauert added. “There had to be something to come out of it. so we weren’t getting the right signals.”

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Trump says N. Korea summit may be back on; Ohio lawmakers react

Published: Friday, May 25, 2018 @ 2:45 PM
Updated: Friday, May 25, 2018 @ 3:00 PM


            PANMUNJOM, SOUTH KOREA - APRIL 27: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (R) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in (L) are in talks during the Inter-Korean Summit on April 27, 2018 in Panmunjom, South Korea. Kim and Moon meet at the border today for the third-ever Inter-Korean summit talks after the 1945 division of the peninsula, and first since 2007 between then President Roh Moo-hyun of South Korea and Leader Kim Jong-il of North Korea. (Photo by Korea Summit Press Pool/Getty Images)
            Pool
PANMUNJOM, SOUTH KOREA - APRIL 27: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (R) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in (L) are in talks during the Inter-Korean Summit on April 27, 2018 in Panmunjom, South Korea. Kim and Moon meet at the border today for the third-ever Inter-Korean summit talks after the 1945 division of the peninsula, and first since 2007 between then President Roh Moo-hyun of South Korea and Leader Kim Jong-il of North Korea. (Photo by Korea Summit Press Pool/Getty Images)(Pool)

President Donald Trump on Friday warmly welcomed North Korea’s promising response to his abrupt withdrawal from the potentially historic Singapore summit and said “we’re talking to them now” about putting it back on track.

“Everybody plays games,” said Trump, who often boasts about his own negotiating tactics and skill.

The president, commenting as he left the White House for a commencement speech, said it was even possible the summit could take place on the originally planned June 12 date.

RELATED: Asian shares lower as North Korea cancellation adds uncertainty

“They very much want to do it, we’d like to do it,” he said.

Earlier Friday, in a tweet, he had called the North’s reaction to his letter canceling the summit “warm and productive.” That was far different from his letter Thursday to North Korea leader Kim Jong Un, blaming “tremendous anger and open hostility” by Pyongyang for the U.S. withdrawal.

The tone from both sides was warmer on Friday. First, North Korea issued a statement saying it was still “willing to give the U.S. time and opportunities” to reconsider talks “at any time, at any format.”

Ohio leaders react

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, was in Dayton Friday and said he was not surprised President Trump called off the summit with North Korea, but was hopeful direct negotiation would happen to cause the regime to disarm its nuclear capability.

“I’ve been one of those people calling for direct negotiations with North Korea, not because they are a country that we should reward or that we can trust, but because we should have direct negotiations with any country that has this nuclear weapons capability,” said Portman, R-Ohio.

He said global sanctions imposed on North Korea were a “good news” story that worked.

“It’s a good example of where if you can get the international community (together) on something, and it really is a diplomatic effort, you can put enough pressure on a regime, even a regime as evil as this one where they say, ‘OK, we want to come to the table and talk,’” said Portman, who also noted North Korea’s recent release of three American detainees.

RELATED: N. Korea demolishes nuclear test site as journalists watch

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said he was “disappointed” that the talks would not take place in June, but is hopeful groundwork can be laid for a future summit.

“We all agree a denuclearized North Korea must be our goal,” he said.

Democratic Ohio House members, meanwhile, were more critical of Trump’s approach.

Rep. Marcy Kaptur of Toledo said North Korea “is not an honest broker” and said that “rushed attempts to deter that nation from its decades-long tradition of brutal and unstable dictatorships will not be effective.”

“Validating Kim Jong Un with the direct involvement of the President may well be premature when dealing with an immature dictator,” she said, but urged Trump to continue to pursue high-level diplomatic talks.

North Korea, U.S. Defense leaders respond

Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan called Trump’s withdrawal “unexpected” and “very regrettable,” and said the cancellation of the talks showed “how grave the status of historically deep-rooted hostile North Korea-U.S. relations is and how urgently a summit should be realized to improve ties.”

Then Trump, in his response to that response, said it was “very good news,” and “we will soon see where it will lead, hopefully to long and enduring prosperity and peace. Only time (and talent) will tell!”

At the Pentagon, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis called the recent back-and-forth between Trump and North Korea the “usual give and take.”

The president’s surprise exit from the planned talks on Thursday had capped weeks of high-stakes brinkmanship between the two unpredictable leaders over nuclear negotiating terms for their unprecedented sit-down. The U.S. announcement came not long after Kim appeared to make good on his promise to demolish his country’s nuclear test site. But it also followed escalating frustration — and newly antagonistic rhetoric — from North Korea over comments from Trump aides about U.S. expectations for the North’s “denuclearization.”

Catherine Lucey and Zeke Miller of the Associated Press contributed to this report.

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