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These Daytonians are going to be immortalized in our city’s own Walk of Fame

Published: Monday, April 16, 2018 @ 11:14 AM

Robert C. Koepnick , Hannah Beachler,  Julia Reichert  and Major General George R. Crook are among the 2018 Dayton Region Walk of Fame inductees.
Robert C. Koepnick , Hannah Beachler, Julia Reichert  and Major General George R. Crook are among the 2018 Dayton Region Walk of Fame inductees.

A three-time Oscar nominee, a husband and wife crime fighting team, and the woman who gave Marvel’s “Black Panther” its eye-popping look are among the next class to be immortalized in the Dayton Region’s Walk of Fame.

>> Wright State grad plays pivotal role in much-anticipated Marvel movie 

The inductees will be celebrated at a luncheon on Thursday, Sept. 27 at the Sinclair College Conference Center, 444 W Third St. in Dayton. 

Tickets for the luncheon are available on the Dayton Walk of Fame website.

Individual tickets are $70. 

Inductees will be on hand during the Walk the Walk street party 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m in the Wright Dunbar Historic Business District May 18. 

The street party ends at 9 p.m. 

The Dayton Region’s Walk of Fame’s memorial stones are on West Third Street in the  business district between Broadway and Shannon streets and along William Street.  

>> RELATED: Daytonians who’ve made us proud

The 2018 honorees are: Hannah Beachler, Major General George R. CrookDr. Richard A. DeWallRobert C. Koepnick, Dayton police sgt. Lucius J. Rice and police officer Dora Burton Rice, and Julia Reichert

Below are their bios from the Dayton Region Walk of Fame. 

Hannah Beachler created a 400-page book envisioning what the African nation of Wakanda might look like for the film, "Black Panther." It got her the job of production Designer for the film. Submitted photo.(HANDOUT)

HANNAH BEACHLER (1971- )

Groundbreaking media production designer 

Hannah Beachler grew up in Centerville, Ohio, majored in fashion design as an undergraduate at the University of Cincinnati and then went back to school at Wright State University in 2005 to earn a B.F.A. from WSU’s Motion Pictures Program. She began working on films as a set dresser in small movies and horror films. Her talent and attention to detail quickly brought her assignments as a production designer. She won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Film for Fruitvale Station and the Audience Award for the Best Film at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013. In 2017 she was nominated for an Emmy and won the Art Directors Guild Award for Excellence in Production Design for a video for Beyoncé. Her most recent success came as the first-ever female black production designer for a Marvel film. That film, Black Panther, is breaking box office records and is one of the most talked about films of the season. She returns home to spend time at WSU talking to students about her career and mentoring many young filmmakers. 

 >> Emmy-award winner: ‘I am proud and grateful beyond words to be from Dayton’

MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE R. CROOK, (1828-1890) Leader in the U.S. military and civil rights activist

MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE R. CROOK (1828-1890)

Leader in the U.S. military and civil rights activist 

George R. Crook was born and raised near Taylorsville, now a part of Huber Heights, Ohio. He graduated from West Point in 1892. He is recognized as a major figure in U.S. military and civil rights history. He had an active career in the Civil War capped by his Division causing General Robert E. Lee to surrender at Appomattox. He was an important commander in the Indian Wars that followed the Civil War. While serving as the Commander of the Department of the Platte in 1879, Crook arranged to have himself sued on behalf of the Ponca tribe. The case resulted in a major civil rights victory when Chief Standing Bear was recognized as a person under the law and therefore Native Americans were entitled to equal protection under U.S. law. Sioux Chief Red Cloud remarked after Crook’s passing that, “He, at least, never lied to us. His works gave us hope.” 

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DR. RICHARD A. DEWALL (1926-2016) 

Pioneer heart surgeon 

Dr. Richard DeWall came to Dayton in 1966 and spent 50 years of his life here. He is credited with inventing the first workable, portable heart-lung machine. Dr. Doug Talbott recruited him to Dayton, and Mrs. Virginia Kettering invited him to initiate an open-heart surgery program at Kettering Hospital, where he performed the first successful open-heart surgery in the area. He established the general surgery residency-training program, serving as its director from 1970-1976 and also acted as a consultant to the National Institutes of Health. The winner of many national and local awards, his proudest accomplishment was his role in the founding of Wright State University School of Medicine because he wrote the original proposal for what would become the medical school. He also helped establish the Wright State School of Medicine Foundation. He said, “With the bubble oxygenator (the name of his invention), you are dealing with maybe several hundred patients a year. With a medical school, when you get it expanded, you’re dealing with thousands.” 

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Robert Koepnick pictured at work in his studio. The finished bust is on display next to this photo.(HANDOUT)

ROBERT C. KOEPNICK (1907-1997)

Nationally known sculptor, talented teacher 

Robert C. Koepnick, a native Daytonian, was born in 1907 and lived virtually all of his life in the Dayton Region. He was a sculptor of national reputation and maintained a studio in Lebanon, Ohio until shortly before his death. He was a prolific, versatile sculptor who worked in wood, bronze, stone, aluminum, and terra cotta. He studied with Carl Miles, the noted Swedish sculptor. He headed the sculpture department at the Dayton Art Institute for almost 30 years, with the exception of a five-year period during World War II when he worked for the Aeromedical Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, helping to design gloves and oxygen masks that made it possible for pilots to fly at ever increasing altitudes. His works are displayed in many states, and he has exhibited in distinguished museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Academy of Design, and the Dayton Art Institute. At least 17 of his major works are displayed in Dayton. He once remarked that, to his amazement, “I really marked up this world.” 

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POLICE SERGEANT LUCIUS J. RICE AND POLICEWOMAN DORA BURTON RICE (1876-1939; 1882-1940)

 Long serving pioneer Police officer and community activist policewoman 

In 1896, when he was 20, Sgt. Lucius Rice moved from North Carolina to Dayton where he met his future wife Dora, a first cousin of the renowned poet, Paul Laurence Dunbar. He served in the Ohio National Guard, distinguishing himself at Lake Erie in 1908 and winning government marksmanship medals. After being honorably discharged from the military, he was appointed to the Dayton Police Department. He became the second African-American man to serve on the Dayton police force and was one of the longest serving Dayton Police officers of the 20th century, serving more than 30 years. He was the first African-American lawman to be appointed a plainclothes detective. He was the first African-American in Dayton to become a police supervisor when he was promoted to sergeant in 1916. During his career, he served with distinction and sacrifice, often working 12-hour days, wounded twice, and then tragically lost his life in the line of duty in 1939. 

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Dora Rice first played the role of homemaker until her children were older when she became a community activist in her church, serving Wesleyan Methodist Church as treasurer for 20 years and as church organist for over 22 years. Then she chose to join her husband in law enforcement. In 1929 she was appointed to the Dayton Bureau of Policewomen, becoming the first African-American policewoman in Dayton. She served for 10 years before resigning for poor health and died six months after her husband was killed. Sgt. Rice is remembered by the Dayton Police History Foundation as a local legend and his wife as a civic activist and Dayton Police Woman. 

Yellow Springs resident, WSU film professor, film maker Julia Reichert holds a DVD of the Academy Award nominated (in the short documentary category) for her role as an associate producer for an HBO documentary called Prison Terminal of which she was an associate producer. JIM WITMER / STAFF(Jim Witmer)

JULIA REICHERT (1946- )

Pioneering independent filmmaker and educator 

Julia Reichert, a graduate of Antioch, has been called the godmother of the American independent film movement. She is a three-time Oscar nominee. Her film Growing up Female was the first feature document of the modern Women’s Movement. Recently it was chosen for inclusion in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. One of her films (with Steven Bognar) premiered at Sundance and won the Primetime Emmy for Exceptional Merit in Nonfiction Filming. She writes, directs, and produces. She is a voting member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences and of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and a member of the advisory board of the Independent Feature Project. She is the co-founder of the New Day Films, a 42-year old social issue film distribution co-op, author of Doing it Yourself, the first book on self-distribution in independent film, a professor of motion pictures at Wright State University and a grandmother. 

 >> Why this local filmmaker win won a  $50,000 grant (January 20, 2016) 

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Rainfall wreaks havoc: ‘Small portion of the road is gone’

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 2:51 PM

Landslide closes road

Heavy rains have washed away sections of some local roadways, prompting emergency closures and repairs by Montgomery County and Miamisburg officials to keep drivers safe.

Rainfall ate away a stretch of Upper River Road near Miamisburg, leaving a guardrail dangling above the Great Miami River and forcing the county to close a stretch of Upper River, according to Gary Shoup, Montgomery County chief deputy engineer.

“With all the rain we’ve been having – not just at this location but at other locations in the county – there have been some landslides,” Shoup said Monday. “A small portion of the road is gone. The posts of the guardrail are no longer embedded into the earth. They are just hanging there.”

RECORD RAINFALL: New record set in Dayton

The damage prompted at least the third recent road closure and fourth emergency action to keep drivers safe in and around Miamisburg due to roadways threatened by erosion, according to officials.

Last week, Miamisburg officials ordered emergency repairs on a portion of Ohio 725. The state route was closed in both directions at times between Riverview and Linden avenues for repairs to an eroded embankment and ditch, according to the city.

“We caught it early and got out there ahead of it,” said Miamisburg city engineer Bob Stanley.

He said the Ohio 725 issue was directly related to the amount of rain pounding Miamisburg’s most heavily traveled route that carries more than 20,000 vehicles a day.

“What we were seeing was significant erosion from runoff from the roadway,” Stanley said.

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On Upper River Road, a landslide from the riverbank along the road took about two feet off a lane along a 50- to 100-foot section between Farmersville-West Carrollton Road and Soldiers Home Miamisburg Road. About 150 vehicles used the road daily during a 2016 traffic count, Shoup said.

Along Ohio 725, large rocks have been fixed in place with concrete to help stabilize the area, Stanley said. The initial work is running the city about $80,000 to be addressed by an emergency ordinance next week, he said.

A section of Lower Miamisburg Road shared by Miamisburg and Montgomery County is also closed due to “slippage,” he said.

“It’s a hillside issue, not a river issue,” Stanley said.

Shoup said near-historic rainfall levels in February — normally when precipitation would come as slow-melting snow — as well as more record-setting rainy days since, laid the groundwork for the problems.

RELATED: Dayton February rain: How 2018 compares to record-shattering years

“It’s not unique to us, it’s throughout all of southern Ohio — the heavy rains and similar situations we’re encountering,” Shoup said.

The proximity of a swollen Little Twin Creek and Manning Road became a concern a couple months ago, prompting Montgomery County crews to place a concrete barrier between the roadway and creek west of Venus Road as a safety precaution, Shoup said.

This February was the fourth rainiest on record, with 5.62 inches at Dayton International Airport, the most since 1990, according to National Weather Service records. Precipitation in March was about a quarter inch more than average, while so far in April is running about one and half inches above normal, even before counting any rainfall Monday or Tuesday.

Montgomery County commissioners are expected to vote Tuesday to keep Upper River Road closed until the engineer’s office can assess the feasibility of a permanent fix. Detours are currently place.

“There’s no decision that the road is going to be closed permanently or not,” Shoup said. “That is something we will have to look at.”

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Computer virus cripples Riverside police, fire server

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 3:06 PM

The City of Riverside said it is the victim of a computer virus that currently has certain police staff unable to access about a year's worth of files.

In a phone conversation Monday afternoon, City Manager Mark Carpenter confirmed the malware infection came in early last week, and initially appeared to be an "email fax." 

The virus is still under investigation, but Carpenter said a Riverside police and fire server has, at present, lost about a year's worth of files. 

Carpenter says the city is currently working with two outside companies to recover the data, some of which is backed up by hard copies. 

No citizen personal information is at risk as a result of the virus, Carpenter said.

He added that the city did not pay money as is often the case in ransomware attacks. 

Carpenter said the city should know within a few days how likely it is that the city will able to recover the missing files.

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Sheriff’s office cruiser rammed in gas station parking lot, 2 detained

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 12:04 PM
Updated: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 3:03 PM

Police activity Philadelphia

UPDATE @ 3 p.m.: 

A Montgomery County Sheriff’s Cruiser was rammed by a stolen car in the parking lot of a Valero gas station in Harrison Twp. Monday, according to deputies. 

Deputies approached the stolen vehicle that was parked in the lot of the Valero gas station at 2800 Philadelphia Drive, according to a media release from the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office. 

“As deputies approached the vehicle, the driver of the vehicle noticed the deputies, re-entered (the) vehicle and fled the area. In fleeing the area, the driver of the vehicle struck a Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office patrol vehicle,” deputies said the in the release. 

There were no injuries initially reported, according to emergency scanner traffic. 

Our crew on the scene observed two people detained at the scene and placed in the back of cruisers. 

No other details were provided by investigators. 

FIRST REPORT

An officer’s cruiser was reportedly struck by a vehicle on Philadelphia Drive this afternoon, according to initial reports.

The incident was reported around noon.

We’re working to learn more.

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Shelby County fatal buggy crash: Victims ID’d, suspect makes court appearance

Published: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 10:24 AM
Updated: Monday, April 23, 2018 @ 2:37 PM

Steve Baker talks to Larry Hansgen about the fatal buggy crash in Shelby County.

UPDATE @ 2:35 p.m.: 

Deputies have identified the victims of a fatal crash involving a horse-drawn buggy in Shelby County Friday night. 

Sarah Schwartz, 23, was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash on Ohio 47 near the Logan, Shelby county line around 9:10 p.m. Friday, according to a media release from the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office. 

Sarah’s husband, Henry Schwartz, 26, and their two children, Elmer, 18-months, and Ester, 4-months, were all ejected in the crash, deputies said. 

Elmer and Ester were transported by a CareFlight medical helicopter to Dayton Children’s Hospital and remain in critical condition. 

Henry was transported to Miami Valley Hospital where he is also listed in critical condition, deputies said. 

Earlier, the Steven Eugene Hunter, who deputies have accused of fleeing the scene of the crash, made an initial court appearance in a Shelby County court. Hunter’s bond was set at $150,000. 

FIRST REPORT: 

A man accused of leaving the scene of a fatal crash involving a horse-drawn buggy in Shelby County made an initial court appearance Monday morning. 

FIRST REPORT: SUV hits buggy: Woman killed, husband, 2 infants critical

Steven Eugene Hunter, 42, has been charged with aggravated vehicular homicide and leaving the scene of an accident in connection to the crash that killed a 23-year-old woman Friday night. 

Steven Hunter

Hunter’s bond was set at $150,000, per the request of the county prosecutor, during the arraignment in Sidney Municipal Court. 

Additional details about the crash have not been released by investigators. At last check, three people, including two children and a man, were all in critical condition at Dayton hospitals. 

We’ll update this page as new details become available. 

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