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JUST IN: Police chief gives update on Dayton shooting in Oregon District

Published: Friday, August 09, 2019 @ 2:55 PM

Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl
Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl

Connor Betts’ movement between when he left his sister and friend in an Oregon District bar and returned about 45 minutes later with a loaded gun is not fully known but a “pivotal” element in the case, Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said Friday.

“I don’t believe we have that gap filled in,” he said.

Betts left Blind Bob’s at about 12:13 a.m. and opened fire outside near the bar at about 1:05 a.m., killing his sister and eight others. Another 14 were hit by bullets.

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The department has turned over all the surveillance video gathered in the investigation to the FBI. Biehl said the FBI has made some progress but did not elaborate.

“Some of that is filled in. There’s a huge volume of video. The FBI is helping stitch together the movements of the entire time,” he said. “That is a tedious process.”

Biehl said investigators are also waiting on the coroner’s final reports, including toxicology tests for Betts.

“His state of mind that night is important,” Biehl said.

» RELATED: Suspect’s sister, a Wright State student, killed in Oregon District shooting

Final coroner’s reports should also reveal which wounds were fatal to Betts and help determine who fired the rounds.

Why Betts, 24, with a history of threatening others with violence, opened fire is a question under examination by federal authorities, Biehl said.

“Certainly, the FBI will continue to pursue this issue of motive and to the degree it may involve these violent ideologies,” he said.

Biehl said the officers who stopped Betts’ rampage and averted many more deaths remain on administrative leave of unspecified length, a measure unique to each incident.

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“This one is extremely violent, including mass casualties,” Biehl said. “This is an event that police officers ever or rarely experience.”