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Isaac’s rains spotty, many areas still thirsty

Published: Monday, September 03, 2012 @ 5:01 PM
Updated: Monday, September 03, 2012 @ 5:01 PM

Hurricane Issac did most of its damage in the south and left Ohio still thirsting for water over the weekend.

Sure, it rained, but not much to make a difference.

“What I’m worried about most (this week),” said WHIO TV meteorologist Erica Collura, “is some (car) hydroplaning and low visibility. There will be no flooding.”

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Chief meteorologist Jamie Simpson of WHIO said there “might be some decent rain next weekend,” but didn’t think it would amount to more than an inch. He called for “spotty showers” Tuesday afternoon and said it would “not be impossible for isolated heavy rain.”

A downpour that didn’t last long on Saturday night drenched Huber Heights with 3.2 inches of rain and Vandalia with an inch and a half, but winds reached only 27 mph there.

It also rained a little on Monday, “but it’s not going to help the corn at all,” Collura said. “It might help the bean size a little.”

John Stedman, the lead farmer at Allwood Farm in Montgomery County, echoed what Collura said.

“Most of the people I’ve talked too say it’s pretty poor,” Stedman said. “The rain will help the soybean crop a little, but I don’t think it will help the corn. Some fields of corn I’ve seen are real short and some (stalks) don’t even develop ears.”

At Allwood, Stedman usually mows just for hay, and his first mowing this summer yielded nearly 600 bales.

“We only got 40 bales out of the second mowing, then 300 some on the third mowing,” Stedman said. “We’ll get another cutting of hay and we’ll see if this rain has helped. I’ve got some friends in Preble County who didn’t get any rain at all. I don’t know what they’re going to do.”

Tom Hertlein, a farmer in Butler Twp. who also farms land for others, said he was lucky that he was a couple weeks late putting out his soybean crop, which allowed it to grow bigger.

“I put it out about May 20 or so,” Hertlein said. “This rain will do a lot of good. I also had some late corn out, but some guys north of here got a zero yield.”

Hertlein also said he attended an insurance meeting recently and last year $2.5 billion was paid out nationally for crops that didn’t come in. This year, the number is expected to be as much as $10 billion.

“It will be November before everybody finds out how bad it was,” Hertlein said.