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Fairborn HS grad to show film in old Fairborn Theater on Saturday

Published: Friday, October 04, 2019 @ 2:36 PM

The marquee outside the Fairborn Theater at 34 S. Broad Street. CONTRIBUTED
The marquee outside the Fairborn Theater at 34 S. Broad Street. CONTRIBUTED

A Fairborn High School graduate will open up the old Fairborn Theater for one night and show a community screening of his film on Saturday.

Jordan C. Terrell screen his documentary HEROINOHIO 7 p.m. Saturday at the Fairborn Theater, 34 S. Broad St.

This will be the first time the theater has opened its doors in nearly 20 years. There will be a pre-show reception at 6 p.m. with a food truck.

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If the theater hits capacity, there will be a second screening at 8 p.m., Terrell said. Tickets to the showing are available on the film’s Facebook page. Terrell is a 2007 Fairborn High School graduate.

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The film follows twin brothers and former heroin addicts, Mike and Chuck Rollins, on their journey to turn abandoned dope houses into recovery homes in their hometown of Springfield.

After being hit by a motorcycle, Mike relapses and Terrell takes viewers on that journey, too.

Terrell first heard about the twins from a Dayton Daily News article, he said. The issue of opioid addiction is personal for Terrell.

“If you ask anyone in Fairborn or Dayton, they’ve either lost someone to opioid addiction or they know someone struggling with it,” Terrell said.

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A few months into filming, Terrell said he lost a close friend to opioid addiction.

“It’s very easy to look from the outside at people with this addiction and say, ‘well why don’t you do this,’” Terrell said. “But they’re not the same person. They’re not thinking clearly. So don’t be so quick to judge someone who is going through this.”

Terrell said he couldn’t help but befriend the brothers throughout the filming of the story.

“I feel like this story is different from (other documentaries about the opioid crisis) because I really put you in the passenger seat of Mike and Chuck’s journey,” Terrell said.