Dayton likely to hire attorneys for red light, speed camera appeals

Published: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 @ 11:30 AM


            Dayton police Detective Jason Ward, of the department’s crash reconstruction unit, holds a Lidar speed gun. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
Dayton police Detective Jason Ward, of the department’s crash reconstruction unit, holds a Lidar speed gun. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The city of Dayton is likely to authorize spending $50,000 to hire two attorneys to oversee the administrative hearings of people who challenge citations they received for allegedly running red lights and speeding.

Last year, the city restarted its photo enforcement safety program, which uses automated cameras to snap photos of vehicles that are traveling above the posted speed limit or that run red lights.

RELATED: New traffic enforcement weapon: Speed guns with cameras

The city is legally required to give citizens a way to contest the citations from traffic cameras, which are mailed out to the registered owners of vehicles that are caught on camera violating the law.

Tonight, Dayton commissioners will vote on contracts with attorneys Marc Ross and Kayla Rowe that would pay them each $85 per hour to oversee the administrative hearings.

In December, six people showed up to the first hearing where people could appeal their citations.

RELATED: Dayton speed cameras: Appeals start as 14,000 tickets issued

One woman showed she was not behind the wheel when her vehicle was caught on camera breaking the law, and her citation was dismissed and reissued to her daughter.

One man tried to argue that physics and quantum physics could explain how he was caught on camera speeding even though he was actually traveling at the posted speed limit. His appeal was denied.

The city also votes tonight on a $305,400 contract with Optotraffic LLC to manage the city’s photo enforcement program.

The city will have fixed, automated cameras at five locations and two speed trailers and six hand-held speed cameras that can be used at sites across the city.

The trailers have proven effective at encouraging motorists to drive more safely, since speed violations have declined 23 percent at one trailer site and 12 percent at the other, the city said.

The city restarted its photo enforcement program on Oct. 1, with warnings being issued for 30 days. The city issued more than 19,000 warnings during that month.

The city has received about $89,900 in revenue from traffic camera fines through mid-December, even though the fixed cameras are not fully operational yet.

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Crews respond to report of partial structure collapse in Dayton

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 5:54 PM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 6:10 PM

Woman falls through porch in Dayton

UPDATE @ 6:10 p.m.

A 40-year-old woman fell through a concrete porch this evening and was taken to Miami Valley Hospital.

The woman was a visitor to the duplex in the 1400 block of Hochwalt Avenue.

The woman’s injuries are considered not life-threatening, and a building inspector has been called, Dayton fire officials said.

Yellow caution tape has been placed on the porch.

FIRST REPORT

Crews were called this evening to a report of a partial structure collapse.

The incident was reported around 5:40 p.m. in the 1400 block of Hochwalt Avenue in Dayton.

According to initial reports, a woman fell through a porch when it caved in. 

We have a crew on the way and will update this report.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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1 injured when Jeep rams into house on South Bird Road in Clark County

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 1:23 PM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 1:36 PM

1 injured when Jeep rams into Clark County house

UPDATE @ 1:27 p.m.: One person has been taken to a hospital after a Jeep rammed into a house on South Bird Road, the Ohio State Highway Patrol said. 

According to the preliminary investigation, a female was driving north when she apparently lost control of the vehicle and rammed the front of the house, where the resident was asleep. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: New details in fatal wrong-way crash

That resident has been taken to Springfield Regional Medical Center, suffering from minor injuries. The driver was not injured, according to troopers. 

South Bird Road will be shut down at Laybourne Road in both directions until further notice.

INITIAL REPORT

Police, sheriff’s deputies, OSP and the gas company are on the scene of a car into a house in the 200 block of South Bird and Laybourne roads in Springfield Twp.

The incident occurred moments ago. Unknown on injuries.

We will update this developing report as we get information.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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Teenager on bicycle struck by vehicle in Dayton, taken to hospital

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 5:04 PM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 5:21 PM

Child on bicycle struck by vehicle

UPDATE @ 5:16 p.m.: The child struck is a teenager and police are indicating that he may have been at fault. 

The investigation is continuing, police said. 

The driver was not injured, but there was damage to the front end of the car.

INITIAL REPORT

A child who was on a bicycle has been taken to children's hospital after the child was struck by a vehicle on Otterbein Avenue at Ruskin Road. 

The incident was reported just after 4:30 p.m. 

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Jeep rams into house; 1 hurt

We're hearing the child's injuries are non-life threatening. 

Police are investigating. 

We will update this developing report as information becomes available. 

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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How to save on your teen’s auto insurance rate

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 4:28 PM

Students sit in an area driver's education class.
Students sit in an area driver's education class.

The cost to add a teen driver to an auto insurance plan in Ohio is more than the national average, but there are ways to save.

Many parents don't realize how pricey it will be, according to Bellbrook mom Tacy Keller. 

Her premium jumped after her son got a ticket, and she will be adding her daughter, Olivia, to her plan this year. 

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"I don't think most of them take into consideration how much they'll be spending. It's more the convenience. 'I'm not going to be running them to practices and running them to work," Keller said. 

Premiums jump 86 percent when a teen driver is added in Ohio, that's higher than the national average of 82 percent, according to a study by Insurance Quotes. 

"The reason for that is your first year of driving, your probability of having a crash is very high," but there are ways parents can save on their teens portion of the premium, said Sharon Fife, president of D&D Driving School in Kettering. 

"I would definitely not buy them a new car. I would also definitely not buy them a car in their name because many insurance companies now rate per your credit score and a new driver isn't going to have the credit rating that an experienced parent would have," said Fife. 

Other costs cutters include B average or above grades, electronic driving monitors and avoiding tickets and accidents. 

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Insurance expenses are a concern for driving student Helen Souder of Oakwood. 

"I'm thinking about costs all the time and how much money I'll spend for driving," Souder said. 

For parents of boys, the sticker shock is much higher. 

Adding a male driver is about 20 percent more expensive than adding a female driver, according to the study.

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