ICYMI:


CEO of health center on Good Sam campus says it’s here to stay

Published: Monday, February 19, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

WHIO Reports Good Samaritan Hospital Closure Feb 11 2018

Obscured by the monumental news that Good Samaritan Hospital will be closed by the end of the year is that a health center on the campus expects to remain operating for years to come.

“We’re not a hospital, but we’re hoping the services we can offer will meet the needs of the community,” Five Rivers Health Centers CEO Gina McFarlane-El said.

The community health center, across the street from the hospital at 2261 Philadelphia Drive, serves patients regardless of their ability to pay. The nonprofit was recognized recently for its work in providing preventative care and managing chronic conditions, which can help avoid unnecessary ER visits.

RELATED: Five Rivers fighting infant death with new pilot program

Premier Health announced in January it would be closing Good Sam by the end of the year, moving staff and services to other locations in the network. The announcement sparked concern throughout the region about whether the move would disproportionately affect the health of residents served by the hospital, a longtime mainstay in northwest Dayton.

McFarlane-El said the Five Rivers Health Centers board will be discussing what it can do to meet the community’s needs in the wake of the hospital’s closing. Five Rivers is a separately operated nonprofit but has a connection with Premier Health and leases its newly constructed building from the health network.

Five Rivers Health Centers CEO Gina McFarlane-El CONTRIBUTED(Staff Writer)

RELATED: Premier Health to close Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton

“This ZIP Code is one of the most populous ZIP Codes in the area. There are a lot of people in this area. So we want to ask what can we do to tap into the needs of the community and figure out what can work,” McFarlane-El said.

The health center’s network of Dayton-area locations, including the center at Philadelphia Drive, served more than 25,000 patients in 2017 and logged 84,307 patient visits. It is set up to serve the uninsured and under-served, as well as proactively respond to some of the community’s most pressing health concerns.

Areas of focus include helping patients who are uninsured sign up for Medicaid if eligible, working to reduce racial health disparities, reducing the high infant mortality rate, and addressing widespread health problems like hypertension, diabetes and obesity.

Five Rivers has primary care services like dental, OB-GYN, behavioral health, sickle cell care, respite care, a medical and legal partnership, psychiatry and pharmacy. It  also has specialty care like gastroenterology, neurology, orthopedic and hand surgery, general surgery and infections disease treatment.

Even after Good Samaritan Hospital is torn down, health services will remain at the campus through Fiver Rivers Health Centers. CONTRIBUTED(Staff Writer)

RELATED: New $4.4M medical center proposed

About 70 percent of the health center’s patient revenue comes from Medicaid, 11 percent from self-paying or uninsured patients, 10 percent from Medicare and 9 percent from commercial insurance. The high Medicaid percentage compares to about 26 percent for the Dayton region as a whole.

McFarlane-El said the health centers also teach doctors through the nonprofit’s large residency program, which trains recent medical school graduates.

The residency program benefits everyone, McFarlane-El said.

“It gives the community residents an important role because they get to help with the training of the next generation of doctors,” she said.

RELATED: Hospital closing a blow, but officials say Good Sam site has promise

By the numbers: Five Rivers Health Centers

$19 million: Annual budget

$3.7 million: Federally qualified health center grant funding

218: Employees

25,092: Patients served in 2017, up 15 percent from 2016

84,307: Patient visits in 2017

70 percent: Portion of patient revenue from Medicaid

Five Rivers Health Centers locations

Center for Women’s Health: 161 Wyoming St.

Dental Center: 30 E. Apple St.

Family Health Center: 2261 Philadelphia Drive

Greene County Health Center: 360 Wilson Drive, Xenia

Medical Surgical Health Center: 725 S. Ludlow St.

Pediatrics: 161 Wyoming St.

Samaritan Homeless Clinic: 921 S. Edwin C. Moses

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Water quality expert: Dayton chemical concerns demand monitoring, attention

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 12:17 PM

Firefighting foam chemicals found in Dayton wellfield monitoring wells

A professor of toxicology and environmental health says Dayton and Montgomery County residents should expect regular monitoring and public updates about water quality in the wake of test results showing the low-level presence of potentially dangerous chemicals.

However, Rita Loch-Caruso, a professor of toxicology in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan, said it’s too soon to recommend buying new household water filtration systems as a cautionary measure.

Loch-Caruso said similar levels of PFAS have been found in Ann Arbor drinking water, where she lives, and she has not purchased a water filtration system.

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“It certainly is low,” she said. “I would say it’s something for the people and for the city to start to pay attention to, and to keep paying attention to.”

“We certainly don’t know everything there is know about PFAS (polyfluoralkyl substances), and PFAS are a difficult group of chemicals to study because there are so many variations of them,” Loch-Caruso said.

PFAS is a substance once used as a firefighting foam at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The chemical has infiltrated groundwater and prompted the shutdown of several Dayton water wells and has now been detected in drinking water bound for customers.

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Dayton and Montgomery County are sending customers notices with the results of recent testing of treated water leaving the city’s Ottawa Water Treatment Plant. The results of March testing show PFAS detected at a level of 7 to 13 parts per trillion.

Officials stress that level is significantly below the EPA health advisory limit of 70 ppt (parts per trillion) for lifetime exposure, but it marks the first time PFAS have been detected in water after the treatment process.

Loch-Caruso said that if she lived in Dayton, “I’d pay attention.”

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“I would like to see my city doing regular monitoring and publishing the results of the concentrations,” she said. “I would like to see a plan for monitoring — how is the city going to watch this?”

Michael Powell, director of the city of Dayton Water Department, said Wednesday the city has monitored the situation and will continue to test concentration levels.

“I drink it every day,” Powell said of Dayton’s water.

One part per trillion is comparable to finding one grain of sand in an Olympic-sized swimming pool, he said.

The discovered concentration levels “are right on the edge of the detection levels that the latest tests are able to detect,” he said.

In fact, they are so low, the levels are labeled by testing labs as “estimated,” he said.

Joe Tuss, Montgomery County administrator, said county leaders will work to coordinate with Dayton to make sure testing protocols are consistent.

“As the entity that has the community asset that is the well fields and water treatment facilities, we want to make sure we are working in concert with the city and certainly making sure they are taking the lead in any activities around this whole PFAS issue,” Tuss said.

“This is something that is really a relatively new issue for water systems around the country,” he added, saying he believes it started to emerge in 2014. “So this is a relatively new phenomenon.”

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Storm Center 7’s Kirstie Zontini to fly with U.S. Navy Blue Angels

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 8:26 AM

Kirstie Zontini prepares to fly with U.S. Navy Blue Angels

Storm Center 7 Daybreak meteorologist Kirstie Zontini is scheduled to fly with the U.S. Navy Blue Angels Wednesday afternoon.

Zontini will be meeting with the team early this afternoon and will be going through a training program to learn how the team’s F/A-18C Hornet aircraft perform and what she should expect during her flight.

This Blue Angels jet has made its arrival at the Dayton Air Show.

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Zontini is scheduled to fly with the team this afternoon around 4:30 p.m.

The Blue Angels are making their first appearance at the Vectren Dayton Air Show since 2014.

The fastest speed the team reaches during its performances is about 700 mph.

News Center 7 will bring you the behind the scenes look at the team and Zontini’s flight throughout the day Wednesday.

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NEW DETAILS: Woman, 87, killed in wrong-way downtown Dayton crash

Published: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 @ 9:20 AM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 11:03 AM

A driver is reportedly trapped inside their vehicle following a crash in downtown Dayton on West Fifth Street Tuesday morning.

The woman killed in a wrong-way crash Tuesday in downtown Dayton is 87-year-old Opal Clouse of Dayton, according to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office.

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Police were dispatched on a report of a crash with one person trapped near West Fifth and South Perry streets about 9 a.m. 

Opal Clouse (Courtesy/Family)

According to a Dayton Police Department traffic incident report, a red Toyota Rav driven by Adrian Traylor, 67, was traveling west in the wrong direction on West Fifth. At the intersection of South Perry, Traylor’s vehicle crashed into Clouse’s silver Honda, sending her vehicle into a DP&L pole.  

Marshall Gorby/Staff

Clouse was pronounced dead at Miami Valley Hospital, according to the report. Traylor was not injured. 

Police said excessive speed doesn’t appear to be a factor and it is not uncommon to see drivers travel the wrong way on Dayton’s one-way streets. 

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“With going the wrong way, there is no traffic device to tell you that you should be slowing down for a red light,” Lt. James Mullins said.  “I’m sure the person was driving normal speeds and had the collision.” 

The preliminary report does not show a charge or citation for Traylor. The crash remains under investigation, according to police. 
Marshall Gorby/Staff

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Showers, storms to return today

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 4:15 AM
Updated: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 11:02 AM

The chance for more showers and storms continues today in the Dayton area.

QUICK-LOOK FORECAST

  • Few evening showers and storms today
  • Chances for rain/storms continues into weekend
  • Little relief from the heat/humidity

>> LIVE Doppler 7 Interactive HD Radar

DETAILED FORECAST

Today: Another hot and humid day is expected. Highs will be in the lower to middle 80s but with the humidity, it’s going to feel more like the upper 80s, according to Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Brett Collar. The chance for showers and storms returns again this afternoon into the evening. These storms could give way to gusty winds and heavy downpours at times.

>> FLOODING: Know your risks

Tonight: Any showers and storms that remain this evening should fade away past sunset. Some fog is possible again overnight with temperatures dropping into the mid-60s.

Thursday: The chance for a few showers and storms returns. Highs will be near 80 degrees.

Friday: The best chance for rain moves in. Showers and storms are expected with highs in the lower 80s.

Saturday: More showers and storms are likely at times, though it won’t be an all-day rain event. Highs to start the weekend will be in the upper 70s to lower 80s. 

>> Cloudy with a chance of podcast

Sunday: More dry time is expected, but there’s still a chance for showers and storms. Highs will be in the lower 80s.

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