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Wright Patt’s Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine marks 100th

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 5:30 AM

Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine reaches its Centennial year

Filled with life-like medical mannequins, dark cargo plane fuselages and a centrifuge that spins humans in circles at high speed, the Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine is unlike most schools.

One of the biggest prizes gained at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in recent years, the school marked its 100th anniversary in ceremonies Friday.

The $194.5 million school opened in a sprawling new building at Wright-Patterson in 2011 after eight decades in Texas. The move was part of a base realignment and closure process in 2005 that brought about 1,200 jobs to Wright-Patterson. Most of those were in aerospace medicine and sensors research from sites in Texas, Arizona, Florida, Massachusetts and New York.

RELATED: On the cutting edge: Wright-Patterson marks a century of innovation in 2017

“We’ve been training flight surgeons for 100 years,” said Col. Alden Hilton, the school’s commander. Today, it also educates flight nurses, enlisted aeromedical technicians, and critical care medical teams, among others.

“These medical personnel are already experienced clinicians,” Hilton said. “But it’s very different to practice medicine in the back of an airplane where it’s dark, very, very noisy and vibration and other movements and what you have with you is all that you’ve got.”

The massive school traces its origins to Hazelhurst Field, N.Y., where it opened as the Medical Research Laboratory of the Air Service in 1918 in the infancy of Army aviation.

RELATED: Stealth bombers, UFO rumors, test pilots among Wright Patterson’s past 100 years

A faculty and staff of about 950 train 4,000 students a year at Wright-Patterson. The school trains airmen in aeromedical evacuations of wounded troops from combat zones to hospitals, has an epidemiology and environmental lab to analyze samples from bases around the world, and researches how to improve human performance with technology as part of the mission of the 711th Human Performance Wing.

Wright-Patterson marked it’s 100th anniversary in 2017.

The base traces its lineage to Dayton’s former McCook Field, an Army airplane engineering research center, Wilbur Wright Field, which prepared airmen for military aviation careers, and the Fairfield Aviation General Support Depot.

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Best state for veterans? Ohio isn’t on the list

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 7:09 AM

HINES, IL - MAY 30:  A sign marks the entrance to the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital on May 30, 2014 in Hines, Illinois. Hines,  which is located in suburban Chicago, has been linked to allegations that administrators kept secret waiting lists at Veterans Administration hospitals so hospital executives could collect bonuses linked to meeting standards for rapid treatment. Today, as the scandal continued to grow, Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki apologized in public and then resigned from his post. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images
HINES, IL - MAY 30: A sign marks the entrance to the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital on May 30, 2014 in Hines, Illinois. Hines, which is located in suburban Chicago, has been linked to allegations that administrators kept secret waiting lists at Veterans Administration hospitals so hospital executives could collect bonuses linked to meeting standards for rapid treatment. Today, as the scandal continued to grow, Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki apologized in public and then resigned from his post. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)(Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Ohio isn’t one of the best states for veterans, according to a new analysis.

The average officer is only 45 years old — 42 for non-disability enlisted personnel — upon retirement from service, according to WalletHub’s new analysis. Military retirees deal with re-assimilation into civilian life, sometimes facing challenges with the job markets, homelessness, disabilities and Post-Tramatic Stress Disorder.

» Your next weekend trip: 20 things to do, see, eat in Cincinnati

WalletHub ranked the best states for the military community, using a data set of 27 key metrics, ranging from veterans per capita to number of VA health facilities to job opportunities for veterans. Ohio didn’t rank in the top 20 states, landing at No. 23. The top states include:

1. Florida

2.Virginia

3. New Hampshire

4. Alabama

5. South Carolina

6. Maine

7. South Dakota

8. Alaska

9. Idaho

10. Texas

11. Montana

12. Minnesota

13. Massachusetts

14. Kentucky

15. Oklahoma

16. Luisiana

17. Wyoming

18. North Dakota

19. Missouri

20. Wisconsin

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Military brides in Dayton can get a free wedding dress this week

Published: Monday, May 21, 2018 @ 7:23 AM

WATCH: Marine's Son, 4, Bursts Into Tears, Hugs New Stepmom During Wedding Vows

A local organization is giving away wedding dress for military brides this week.

The third annual Marry Me Military for all military brides will take place on Sunday, May 27 in the Grand Ballroom at Holiday Inn Dayton/Fairborn. The event, offered by the United Service Organizations -Central and Southern Ohio, is open to 75 brides from noon to 3 p.m. The event has provided military brides with more than 300 free bridal gowns.

» Best state for veterans? Ohio isn’t on the list

Each bride can bring two guests. To be eligible for a complimentary wedding dress, brides must be an active duty, guard or reserve military member getting married, or the fiancé of an active duty, guard or reserve military member. If their military member is deployed, they must bring a copy of his/her orders and a short letter of introduction, along with their confirmation e-mail to be granted access to the event.

“We are excited to be able to provide wedding dresses to our military brides on their special day,” said Mia Walthers, center manager of WPAFB USO. “Often funds are low for our military members, so providing a new gown is one way our USO can show support to our new brides and help offset the expenses of the wedding. In the past, several brides told us they would have never been able to afford a dress like the one they got at the Marry Me Military events.”

Deadline to register is May 25.

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AF museum attendance soars on first day of Memphis Belle opening

Published: Friday, May 18, 2018 @ 1:38 PM


            The Memphis Belle exhibit opens at the National Museum of the US Air Force. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
            TY GREENLEES
The Memphis Belle exhibit opens at the National Museum of the US Air Force. TY GREENLEES / STAFF(TY GREENLEES)

Attendance at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force soared Thursday nearly four times above the average for the same date in recent years with the debut of the Memphis Belle exhibit, figures show.

The museum counted 11,066 people in attendance for the unveiling of the reborn icon, compared to an average of 2,421 on May 17 between 2015 through 2017, spokesman Rob Bardua said.

“We are anticipating large crowds for sure,” he said. “You never know the exact number to expect.”

RELATED: ‘It took my breath away,’: Memphis Belle unveiled at AF museum

Memphis Belle activities with more than 160 re-actors, plane flyovers, book signings and movie screenings were to continue through Saturday,

The Belle was the first U.S.Army Air Forces bomber to complete 25 missions over war-torn Europe and return to the United States. The exhibit was revealed to the public on the 75th anniversary of its final mission.

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Did you see the president’s plane? Why it was here.

Published: Friday, May 18, 2018 @ 11:08 AM

A lumbering Air Force VC-25 presidential transport plane know as Air Force One was flying over Dayton and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base for more than an hour on Thursday

Spectators of World War II bombers and fighters landing at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force got an extra bonus Thursday.

The plane commonly referred to as Air Force One, a Boeing 747 designated VC-25 in the Air Force, practiced touch-and-go landings on Wright-Patterson’s main runway. The jumbo jet is Air Force One only when the president is aboard.

Two B-17 bombers, a P-51 fighter and a PT-19 trainer, flew to the museum’s airstrip from Grimes Field in Urbana around the same time as part of festivities marking the debut of the B-17 Memphis Belle exhibit at the museum.

RELATED: ‘Memphis Belle’ will rumble over real-life version in Dayton

“Wright-Patt is an ideal location for training the VC-25 crews because we are close by air to the (Washington) DC area, have a long runway and light traffic compared to the DC metropolitan area,” base spokesman Daryl Mayer said in an e-mail. “It was merely a coincidence the VC-25 was training at the same time the B-17 contingent was landing on the (museum’s) runway. Our tower had contact with all aircraft at all times and were in compliance with all safety regulations.”

The World War II aircraft took off later in the day and may return for flyovers Friday but will not land because of weather concerns, said museum spokesman Rob Bardua.

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