Poor weather conditions cancel landing of B-17s, P-51s

Published: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 @ 12:00 PM
Updated: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 @ 9:59 AM

World War II-era planes to fly over Dayton Wednesday morning

UPDATE @ 10 a.m.: 

Poor weather conditions will prevent a dozen World War II planes from landing at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Wednesday. 

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The arrivals were first delayed by two hours Wednesday morning, but were cancelled just before 10 a.m.

The planes however will conduct flyovers during the day as weather permits, according to officials. 

Additional details were not immediately available. 

FIRST REPORT (May 16):

A dozen World War II planes —- including three World War II-era bombers — will rumble the skies Wednesday above the Miami Valley to mark the unveiling of the restored icon the B-17F Memphis Belle, expected to bring thousands of spectators to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force this week.

The planes originally were scheduled to arrive beginning at 8 a.m., but the Air Force museum announced arrivals would start 10:30 a.m. Wednesday because of weather delays. The planes will be on static display Thursday and Friday.

Two B-17s —the Movie Memphis Belle, which starred in a 1990 Hollywood film about the famed plane, and Yankee Lady of the Yankee Air Force — along with several P-51 Mustangs and training aircraft — will fly in from Grimes Field in Urbana while the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Aluminum Overcast will take-off from Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport in Miami Twp., on Wednesday morning, said museum spokesman Rob Bardua.

“It’s almost going to be like 1945,” said John Cassano, of Rochester, N.Y., and a Movie Memphis Belle crewman and volunteer affiliated with the National Warplane Museum in New York.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: ‘Memphis Belle’ will rumble over real-life version in Dayton

The Memphis Belle and a new World War II strategic bombing exhibit will be unveiled at a private event Wednesday evening with a public ribbon-cutting at 9:15 a.m. Thursday, the 75th anniversary of the Memphis Belle’s 25th bombing mission over Europe.

Under restoration at the museum since 2005, the Memphis Belle was the first U.S. Army Air Force’s bomber to finish 25 missions over Europe and return to the United States. The plane, the star of a 1944 documentary, embarked on a three-month war bonds and morale building tour in 1943 that included a stop in Dayton.

To accommodate crowds, Gate 24B off Harshman Road near the U.S. Army Reserve Center will be open to inbound traffic only starting at 8 a.m. Thursday through Saturday, May 17-19.

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Those driving southbound on Harshman, and coaches, buses, RVs or other oversized vehicles, won’t be allowed to enter through Gate 24B and must drive through 28B, the main gate off Springfield Street, according to the museum.

The three B-17 bombers flying in for the celebration will sell rides Saturday and Sunday from the fields they departed before landing at the museum, organizers said.

The Movie Memphis Belle and the Yankee Lady will sell rides for $450 a seat Friday and Saturday at Grimes Field and Aluminum Overcast will sell rides for $475 a seat to EAA non-members and $435 for members Saturday and Sunday at Dayton-Wright Brothers, organizers said. For additional information on rides aboard Aluminum Overcast, log onto b17.org; for Movie Memphis Belle log onto https://nationalwarplanemuseum.com/rides-1; and for the Yankee Lady log onto http://yankeeairmuseum.org/fly/.

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Air Force rolls out new enlisted personnel handbook: Here’s what changed

Published: Thursday, July 12, 2018 @ 10:08 AM

Airmen from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base hold a large American flag during a pregame ceremony prior to a Wright State University basketball game at the Nutter Center. The college hosted a military appreciation night. (U.S. Air Force photo/R.J. Oriez)
Staff Writer
Airmen from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base hold a large American flag during a pregame ceremony prior to a Wright State University basketball game at the Nutter Center. The college hosted a military appreciation night. (U.S. Air Force photo/R.J. Oriez)(Staff Writer)

The U.S. Air Force just rolled out its new enlisted personnel handbook, and it’s changing up the way enlisted airmen will address senior master sergeants.

Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright announced the changes on Facebook. The Air Force no longer requires an associate’s degree from the Community College of the Air Force as a promotion requirement for master sergeants.

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“One of the biggest changes you’ll see, one that we’re also working to codify in our other AFIs, comes in para 3.1.3.1. An Associate’s Degree from the CCAF is no longer a promotion requirement,” Wright said.

New changes also address the way airmen address their top enlisted leaders. Airmen may address E-8s as “senior” or “sergeant” now, according to the handbook. The handbook defines the enlisted force structure and implements policy. This new handbook replaces the 2009 Air Force rules. View the handbook here.

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“To all the Seniors who’ve been telling people to stop using Senior, apparently now you’re officially a Senior, Senior,” one airmen commented on Wright’s announcement.

The changes are part of an initiative to address dated amendments.

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Dayton VA loses $90K in equipment. Why that’s ‘as close to zero as we can reasonably get.’

Published: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 @ 6:39 PM


            Dayton VA Medical Center. JIM NOELKER/STAFF
Dayton VA Medical Center. JIM NOELKER/STAFF

The Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center lost more than $90,000 in equipment between 2014 and 2017, according to a new investigation.

Dayton VA Public Affairs Officer Ted Froats said the number, which equates to about $22,500 a year, represents a fraction of the Dayton VA’s yearly inventory — around .0002 percent.

“The reality of running a 24/7 hospital with 500,000 outpatient visits a year is that that’s probably as close to zero as we can reasonably get,” Froats told this news organization in an email.

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VA facilities across the country lost more than $1 million in that time period, according to a WBNS-10TV investigation.

In Dayton, a total of $90,305 was lost.

John Hoellwarth, the national director of communications for AMVETS, said veterans deserve accountability regardless of the value.

“Whether it’s $1 million or $1.50, veterans deserve a VA that’s accountable,” Hoellwarth said.

Froats said that from 2015 to 2016, the Dayton VA cut their lost equipment per year in half, and the organization continued that progress into 2017.

The Dayton VA lost the least amount of equipment of the centers that were investigated. In Columbus, the VA facility lost $318,068.38; in Chillicothe, that number was $279,912.45.

The losses came even after the VA spent $24 million in Ohio to attach tracking devices to some equipment. The tracking devices, also known as real-time location systems or RTLS, either ping out a device’s location or allow a VA employee to scan for the items to keep track of them, according to the investigation.

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That doesn’t mean the devices will always work. According to records obtained as part of the investigation, the Dayton VA hired a contractor in 2014 to do an inventory of its equipment inventory listings, but the contractor left more than 1,000 items out of the inventory.

According to the records, the individuals that installed the RTLS in Dayton “did not perform well” and some of the devices were shown as being in rooms other than what they were, making the RTLS useless in the facility’s search for the lost items.

Records noted that the VA expected to find most or all of the missing equipment with the next inventory.

“It is our belief these items are not stolen and should be identified when the next wall-to-wall inventory is conducted,” the report reads.

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Froats said theft isn’t always the cause of losses, and items like stretchers or infusion pumps that travel with patients and can be mixed up in other units or even another hospital.

Froats said the Dayton VA prides itself on keeping track of its equipment.

“I’m a taxpayer, my boss is a taxpayer, her boss is a taxpayer,” Froats said. “We take lost equipment very seriously at the Dayton VAMC, and that’s why we’re proud to be the best in Ohio – successfully tracking 99.9998 percent of our annual inventory.”

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Thunderbirds celebrate milestone year representing US Air Force

Published: Tuesday, July 10, 2018 @ 9:05 AM

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The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds have been roaring through the skies for 65 years.

The Thunderbirds are celebrating its 65th year of representing the U.S. Air Force. On May 25, 1953, the Air Force’s official air demonstration team, designated the 3600th Air Demonstration Unit, was activated at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona. The unit was named the “Thunderbirds” in part because of the strong Native American culture in Arizona.

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The first demonstration team flew and maintained the F-84G Thunderjet. “The straight-wing configuration of the F-84G was considered well suited for aerobatic and demonstration maneuvers, though the aircraft could not exceed the speed of sound,” according to the Thunderbirds team.

The Thunderbirds have traded aircraft throughout the years, flying the F-84F Thunderstreak, the F-105B Thunderchief, the F-100Ds and the F-16.

<p> FILE - In this June 18, 2010 file photo the U. S. Air Force Thunderbirds practice a maneuver during a rehearsal in preparation for a weekend air show, in Oklahoma City. The U.S. Air Force says a member of its Thunderbirds flight demonstration team was killed in the crash of his F-16 fighter jet in central Nevada. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki,File) </p>(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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The Thunderbirds did not fly at the Vectren Dayton Air Show this year. Military jet teams like the Thunderbirds and the Navy Blue Angels are the biggest draw for the air show and organizers bank on their appearance to bring tens of thousands to the grounds at James M. Cox Dayton International Airport. The show can draw as many as 65,000 or more spectators when the teams fly, officials say.

In 2016, the Thunderbirds crashed prior to the Dayton Air Show, and injured Pilot Capt. Erik Gonsalves and Tactical Aircraft Maintainer Staff Sgt. Kenneth Cordova. The F-16 sustained significant damage, and the Thunderbirds cancelled all performances at the air show.

WATCH the Thunderbirds commemorate 65 years.

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Verizon’s new military discount program could save you hundreds

Published: Thursday, July 05, 2018 @ 10:53 AM

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Verizon’s new military discount program could save you hundreds of dollars every year.

Last week, Verizon launched its new program — active military, veterans and Gold Star families are eligible to save up to $40 every month on their cellphone plans. The deal offers $15 off regular monthly prices on one phone plan. It also offers $30 off on two lines or $40 off on three lines under Verizon’s unlimited plans.

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Military families can receive a $200 Mastercard prepaid card when activating a new 4G LTE smartphone on a new line of service, according to the company.

To get the military discount, simply login to your account and choose the unlimited plans you need.

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