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Intrusion detection and alarm management takes an enterprise approach

Published: Friday, October 06, 2017 @ 10:50 AM


            Staff Sgt. Joshua Modlin, assistant noncommissioned officer in charge of the 88th Security Forces Squadron’s Electronic Security Systems, works with Joe Andrews of M.C. Dean Inc. to establish a configuration baseline by ensuring the more than 16,000 ESS assets throughout Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are accurately identified Sept. 20. Andrews helped develop the Infrastructure Maintenance Management System being implemented throughout the Air Force to not only track maintenance of critical ESS infrastructure, but also help to identify trending problems and develop improvements that can be implemented enterprise wide. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jim Varhegyi)
Staff Sgt. Joshua Modlin, assistant noncommissioned officer in charge of the 88th Security Forces Squadron’s Electronic Security Systems, works with Joe Andrews of M.C. Dean Inc. to establish a configuration baseline by ensuring the more than 16,000 ESS assets throughout Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are accurately identified Sept. 20. Andrews helped develop the Infrastructure Maintenance Management System being implemented throughout the Air Force to not only track maintenance of critical ESS infrastructure, but also help to identify trending problems and develop improvements that can be implemented enterprise wide. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jim Varhegyi)

The Air Force’s Installation Management and Mission Support Center developed a solution for not only managing the day-to-day maintenance of intrusion detection and alarm systems, but also for developing and implementing a continuous improvement process.

The Air Force Security Forces Center, which falls under the AFIMSC umbrella, began implementing the management change last year, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is the most current installation to come into the enterprise-wide program.

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“This is a big win for the Security Forces career field,” said Maj. Aaron Rittgers, 88th Security Forces Squadron commander.

He explained that normally at each location throughout the Air Force, intrusion detection and alarm systems are designed and maintained locally. Electronic Security Systems is a Security Forces mission area. Under the current management model, ESS defenders have to learn the unique attributes of a location and how the various alarms and detection systems of that location are operated and managed.

“Under the new model being implemented across the Air Force, our ESS defenders can hit the ground running when they change locations because the systems are being managed the same way across the Air Force,” Rittgers said. “The enterprise solution being implemented is truly a force multiplier in how we protect the vital assets under our care.”

When asked about the challenges unique to Wright-Patterson AFB, Rittgers explained because of the nature of the work being done, the base has the largest volume of alarm and intrusion detection systems in the Air Force.

“As with any change, we are anticipating some hiccups along the way, but our ESS defenders have been working diligently with the incoming BCF Solutions contractors to ensure that the changeover goes smoothly, and the process remains seamless to our customers,” he said.

Rittgers also praised civil engineer and communication professionals, whom he described as diligent partners in managing the ESS systems to date. He explained they did a phenomenal job supporting the mission and responding to any problems that cropped up in the systems, day or night.

Instrumental in ensuring the success of the management changeover has been Tech. Sgt. Matthew Gillett, non-commissioned officer in charge of the ESS, and his assistant, Staff Sgt. Joshua Modlin. Modlin explained the system is robust and constantly growing and that they are looking forward to working with contractors from BCF Solutions to continue to provide the best customer service and support possible.

There won’t be any immediate infrastructure changes, explained Modlin.

“We just went through an extensive infrastructure refresh, so our system is pretty robust,” he said. “The only difference that our 1,200 alarm custodians across the installation will experience is in who they call when they experience a problem that needs some sort of technical support.”

James Atkins, from the Cryptologic and Cyber Systems Division at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, is the contracting officer’s representative for the project. He explained that a unique aspect of the change in ESS management is the impetus on continuous system improvement.

He brought a team to Wright-Patterson AFB early in the process to help ensure a smooth implementation of the Fixed Site Sustainment-II contract. Atkins explained that the management change will give the ESS defenders a dedicated infrastructure maintenance management system to monitor and track alarm maintenance trends across the entire Air Force.

By tracking these data points the best system configurations can be determined and quickly implemented. The IMMS will also help identify problematic areas, so trending issues can be detected early and enterprise-wide solutions can be put in place at a much faster rate.

The SFS commander reiterated that due to the unique and critical research that happens throughout the installation, intrusion detection and asset security truly is a force multiplier for the entire Air Force.

“We take the mission of protecting our assets very seriously, and we’re confident that the new way of managing the ESS system will ensure our ability to accomplish that mission,” Rittgers said.

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9 arrested after drug-related search warrant at Eaton home

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 2:12 PM
Updated: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 2:34 PM

Top row: Steven Jones (L), Samantha Dillon (C), James E. Busteed (R).
Middle: Kara Straszheim (L), Brittany N. Betzner (C), Travis R. Hodapp (R)
Bottom: Martin J. Boomershine (L), Darrell Raymond Griffith (C), Nicole L. Sherer (R)
Top row: Steven Jones (L), Samantha Dillon (C), James E. Busteed (R). Middle: Kara Straszheim (L), Brittany N. Betzner (C), Travis R. Hodapp (R) Bottom: Martin J. Boomershine (L), Darrell Raymond Griffith (C), Nicole L. Sherer (R)

Nine people were arrested after police executed a drug-related search warrant at a Eaton home Friday morning, according to Eaton Police Chief Steven Hurd. 

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Eaton police and the Preble County Sheriff’s Office executed the search a the home in the 600 block of Aukerman Street around 8 a.m. Friday, Hurd confirmed to this news outlet. 

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Hurd said the house was known to police for drug activity and have made arrests there before for drug-related charges. 

Police arrested nine people on various charges and all were booked into the Preble County Jail: 

  • Brittany N. Betzner, 30, on a charge of possession of a drug abuse instrument
  • Martin J. Boomershine, 44, on a charge of possession of a drug abuse instrument
  • James E. Busteed, 29, on charges of possession of drugs, and possession of a drug abuse instrument
  • Samantha Dillon, 28, on charges of possession of a drug abuse instrument and obstructing official business 
  • Darrell Raymond Griffith, 73, on charges of permitting drug abuse and possession of a drug abuse instrument
  • Travis R. Hodapp, 37, on charges of with possession of a drug abuse
  • Steven Chad Jones, 27, obstructing official business and a parole violation
  • Nicole L. Sherer, 35, possession of a drug abuse instrument
  • Kara Straszheim, 27, charged with possession of a drug abuse instrument

Contributed Photo

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Lawsuit claims potty seat sold at Target can injure boys, cause lacerations

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 2:33 PM

Families of 15 boys have filed a class action lawsuit against Target and the makers of the WeePod potty training seat,  claiming the boys suffered cuts to their genitals after using the defective product.
Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/service/terms/#usage
Families of 15 boys have filed a class action lawsuit against Target and the makers of the WeePod potty training seat, claiming the boys suffered cuts to their genitals after using the defective product.(Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/service/terms/#usage)

The families of 15 young boys have filed a class-action lawsuit against Target and the makers of a popular potty training seat, over claims toddler boys’ genitals can get stuck in the seat, causing serious lacerations.

The weePOD potty training seats are manufactured by Prince Lionheart Inc. 

“Like an old leather car seat and you're wearing a tank top and it sticks, so it's the same mechanism,” attorney John Kristensen told KNBC. “When you pull it off, the penis is still stuck but the rest of the body is moving. That skin is so sensitive that it rips.”

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Attorneys said that Prince Lionheart knew the seats were defective and made corrections, but over 500,000 defective potty seats are still being sold on store shelves. 

Daniel, one father who is participating in the lawsuit on behalf of his son, said he was lifting the 4-year-old out of the family’s weePOD Basix potty when the boy started screaming.

“We were, I don’t know how to explain it, horrified to see that happening to our son,” Daniel told KABC. “There was blood, skin, everything everywhere.”

The parents said they took the boy to the emergency room.

Attorneys representing the families said that Prince Lionheart is refusing to pull the defective child product from store shelves.

“They've modified it, but the defective ones are still out there, and they're going to be hurting kids in the future,” attorney John Carpenter told KSAB.

An attorney for Prince Lionheart stated that the company disagrees with the claims.

Target also issued a statement, saying it requires all vendors to follow product safety laws and Consumer Product Safety Commission guidelines. 

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Endangered Missing Adult Alert issued statewide for northern Ohio man, 83

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 2:30 PM

A statewide Endangered Missing Adult Alert has been issued for an 83-year-old northern Ohio man who hasn't been seen since he left his residence Friday morning.

Sheldon Kamen was last seen about 10:30 a.m. when he was leaving his residence on Southhampton Drive in Aurora, Portage County. He hasn't been seen since, according to Aurora police. 

He suffers from Alzheimer's. He has gray hair, brown eyes, about 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs about 170 pounds. 

He is believed to be driving a black Toyota Rav4 bearing Ohio license tage GLZ 4994.

Sheldon Kamen is believed to be driving a vehicle similar to this one, Aurora (Ohio) police said Friday. (Courtesy/Aurora Police Dept.)

 

Police issued a photo similar to one Kamen is believed to be driving. 

Call or dial 911 if you see the adult or the vehicle.

You can also call the Aurora police, 330-562-8181, the Ohio Attorney General Missing Persons Unit, 1-866-693-9171 or 911 to be transferred directly to the investigating law enforcement agency or to hear the alert information.

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Migrant mother, 7-year-old son reunited after being separated at border

Published: Friday, June 22, 2018 @ 1:01 PM

WATCH: Guatemalan Mother And Son Reunited

A Guatemalan woman and her 7-year-old son were reunited early Friday in Baltimore, one month after immigration officials separated them at the U.S.-Mexico border, according to multiple reports.

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Beata Mariana de Jesus Mejia-Mejia filed suit Tuesday against the government, claiming immigration officials “ripped” her son, Darwin, from her after they crossed the border into Arizona last month, Politico reported.

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She was reunited with her son around 2:30 a.m. at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, hours after a Justice Department lawyer told a U.S. District Court judge the child would be released.

Mejia-Mejia, 38, told reporters waiting to capture their reunion Friday morning that she could tell from her son’s face that “he’s sad, but we’re going to be together, and no one’s going to separate us again,” The Washington Post reported.

Mejia-Mejia and Darwin surrendered on May 19 to Border Patrol agents after they crossed from Mexico into the U.S. near San Luis, Arizona, according to the Post. Darwin was held at a shelter in Phoenix before his release Friday, CNN reported.

Mejia-Mejia, who came from Guatemala, filed for asylum after crossing the border. She was fleeing from violence and death threats from her husband, according to CNN.

 >> Behind the viral photo of toddler crying at the US border 

The Post reported that Mejia-Mejia was not criminally charged for crossing the border. Her attorneys argued that her case “showed that border officials were separating families to deter asylum seekers,” a tactic authorities have denied using.

The Trump administration in April directed prosecutors to pursue cases against all people suspected of crossing the border illegally as part of a “zero tolerance” immigration enforcement policy. Parents were separated from their children as they faced prosecution. 

>> Trump signs executive order ending migrant family separations 

Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May, according to the Department of Homeland Security.

Trump ended the policy Wednesday with an executive order after unsuccessfully calling on Congress to stop the separations through legislation. 

Watch – President Trump Signs Executive Order Ending Migrant Family Separations
The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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